Sancocho Recipe Reviews - Allrecipes.com (Pg. 1)
Reviewed: Sep. 7, 2014
This recipe was very delicious. For one of the comments below Ajiaco is not Columbian, it's the Cuban version of sancocho but the Cuban version has corn, pumpkin, malanga and stew meats in it. Dominican sancocho is also like the cuban version. Regardless all of them are very delicious and very Hispanic/Latin American. One pot wonder. Thanks for the recipie!
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Reviewed: Jan. 21, 2014
This stuff really is great
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Cooking Level: Intermediate

Home Town: San Diego, California, USA
Living In: Dallas, Texas, USA
Reviewed: May 27, 2012
this did not come out at all how I had hoped. reviews were so good but I did not care for it.
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Reviewed: Jan. 20, 2012
Suggest cutting plantain into smaller pieces, yuca could be shaved instead of adding in chunks, and add 1Tbsp chicken bullion.
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Reviewed: Dec. 7, 2011
This was a good soup. Not as hearty as the Caribbean version, the one from the Dominican Republic has more ingredients: Culantro, cilantro, more root vegetables, different meats, chicken, beef, sausage. I will upload my dominican version soon.
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Reviewed: Oct. 17, 2011
Taste just like the Sancocho I had growing up in Panama! A few changes to make it more Panamanian: Leave out the onion/tomato garnish (the soup really doesn't need it), add a can of corn, triple the cilantro, and if you don't have yucca or calabasa don't worry about it add more potatoes.
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Reviewed: Jun. 16, 2011
Delicious! Very simple, good and cheap! Leg quarters are usually inexpensive and the veggies didn't cost much either. I was hesitant about the plantain but it's good!! I couldn't find yucca but it still turned out great. The onion and tomato topping is a must!!
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Cooking Level: Intermediate

Home Town: Vermillion, South Dakota, USA
Living In: Greeley, Colorado, USA

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Reviewed: Jan. 20, 2011
I vary this recipe with different combinations of ñame, yuca, green and ripe plantains, malanga and various spices. As for the issue of the origin of the soup, you have to go back further than pre-Panama. Sancocho in Latin America, especially the Caribbean, evolved from both Puchero Canario and Sancocho of the Canary Islands, which were brought with "Canarios" -- Canary Islanders who emigrated to Latin America.
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Reviewed: Nov. 27, 2010
I was very glad to find a good recipe for sancocho on here! It was one of my favorite things when I lived in Panama. Incidentally, several people are a bit confused with terminology, so I wanted to clear this up: cassava = yuca = tapioca. They are identical, just different names for the exact same plant. So you don't need to substitute yuca for cassava... it's the same! Also, it's "yuca" not "yucca". The later is a completely different plant and not related to the one used here.
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Reviewed: Aug. 24, 2010
There is also a Sancocho we make in PR! I am not going to argue about authenticity and such...that's not important!! It's the equivalent of arguing about Dim Sum, TOO MANY VERSIONS!! Anyways... what's important is the actual review of this particular recipe. I don't care for bones (yeah, it adds flavor and blah blah) so I used boneless chicken thighs, a bit more garlic, YUCA root and CASSAVA root are the SAME THING!!!! Look it up!! The color of the sancocho is not appetizing and I wasn't 100% happy with the flavor. It was edible (got to have fresh bread to dip in the juices, in my case) and it was altogether ok.
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Cooking Level: Intermediate

Home Town: Jardines Del Caribe, Ponce, Puerto Rico

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