Beef Tamales Recipe Reviews - Allrecipes.com (Pg. 11)
Reviewed: Dec. 31, 2004
This is a great recipe. I used it when I tried making them my first time. i did find that i had to let them cook a bit longer though than the recipe called for
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Photo by MiaReaA

Cooking Level: Intermediate

Home Town: Alviso, California, USA
Living In: Pleasanton, California, USA

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Reviewed: Nov. 19, 2004
This recipe looks really good. I use a pork roast instead of beef and they are excellent. Chili goes better with pork
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Reviewed: Oct. 5, 2004
A cultural note for everyone who says the tamale recipes take too long. Traditionally a family will have a "tamalada"- a get together where family will work together assembling the tamales. Making tamales is a time consuming process but when you do it this way, you will have an opportunity to visit with family and develop family bonds. (It is great with friends too...)
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Cooking Level: Expert

Home Town: Eagle Pass, Texas, USA
Living In: Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

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Reviewed: Sep. 18, 2004
This was my first time making this recipe. It was a hit! I used chicken instead of beed and though, I did not use lard for the masa. The masa I used just called for water. My husband and friends loved them.
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Reviewed: Sep. 14, 2004
This is a very authentic recipe. Authentic Mexican food is very falvorful, but not hot. It is we chili heads north of the border who have added the heat. That's called Tex-Mex. I recently had something suggested to me that cuts the time in half when making tamales. Take your tortilla press and line it with plastic or waxed paper, lay your shuck in it and place a walnut sized ball of masa, then press it down as if making tortillas, it spreads the masa, keeps your hands cleaner (clean isn't really an option when working with this :) ) and fills the shucks in no time at all. Just make sure you line that side of the press too. Also, for an interesting twist, try adding a little mole (found in a jar in the mexican food aisle and looks like spreadable chocolate) into your masa harina mixture. You can also use either red or green enchilada mix, a really thin salsa, Louisianna hot sauce (if you want heat) and anything else you can think of. For a really interesting twist from the Yucatan, instead of using corn shucks, use bananna leaves. The flavor is incredible although you will absolutely need to tie these unline corn shucks which have a tendency to fold back up on them selves anyway. Either buy the bananna leaves at a Hispanic market or order them online.
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Reviewed: Aug. 27, 2004
Overall this is a superb recipe, they remind me of tamales they serve at resturants on the southside of Tucson,AZ. They'll make great Christmas gifts this year! There seem to be a few too many steps, but I guess no guts no glory.
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Reviewed: Aug. 26, 2004
The masa was too bland even after I added some extra spices to the mix and to the broth. That didn't stop them from being very good though. I just let my family add their own amount of salt for their own preference. Another thing that happened to me was that my masa would not get firm. It remained mushy even after steaming for two hours. It was probably my own mistake, I probably had too much water in the steamer. I solved the problem by placing the tamales in the oven on really high heat for a little while. Just until the husks turned a little brown on the edges. I tought they were perfect after that. Great recipe.
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Reviewed: Aug. 16, 2004
Nothing wrong with this recipe at all. Very Authentic. If you are not into authentic food then you may want to spice it up a bit more, but I found this recipe to be very true to authentic mexican food. I would suggest though that you make sure you have plenty of meat on hand; I thought I had enough but ended up running out of meat after about 47 of these buggers. I think you need more than four pounds but I may have not had four pounds after the cook off. I used the beef drippings to flavor the masa and had no problems. Also, I had way too many corn husks left over, I could have done with only 1 package. I dont think you have to use multiple layers of husks to wrap these, I used only 2 layers and came out just fine.
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Cooking Level: Expert

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Reviewed: Feb. 11, 2004
if you have never attempted tamales, here are some important tips: boil garlic and dried or fresh peppers in water(your favorite kind of pepper)for 30-ish minutes then cook the meat in that broth(leave peppers/garlic in) and add lots of spices. This broth flavors the meat very well--I like spice so I use tons of peppers and garlic. The meat should be cooked long enough that it practically crumbles to the touch--this makes it easier and faster to shred by hand--I usually cook mine 4 hours to overnigt depending on the cut of meat. Boiling the meat is actually the only thing it needs cooking wise--but it depends on whether you boil in the meat in all the spices or add them later. I soak my corn husks in hot/boiling water--this makes them softer faster. Two important things to remember: masa is very bland and there is no substitute for lard! I keep my meat juice for masa flavoring but still add other stuff--El Pato (mexican style tomato sauce)if you can find it is spectacular! When making the tamales, the corn husks should only be about five inches across--any larger need to be sized! (Line the meat along the edge and roll like a cigar) If I plan on freezing I cook them only half the time--also, don't load to many in the steamer or they won't cook evenly! When you place them in the steamer they need to be standing up as much as possible.
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Reviewed: Jan. 27, 2004
Wonderful recipe! I've made plenty. We enjoy chicken the best. We steam all of them and freeze. Microwave or steam to heat. Makes for easy dinner.
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