Aunt Bill's Brown Candy Recipe Reviews - Allrecipes.com (Pg. 1)
Reviewed: Oct. 4, 2014
My favorite candy ever! It's been a handed down recipe since the 40's. I love the taste of caramel but this is so much better not to mention an awesome texture and doesn't stick to your teeth. You need two people to make this but so worth it.
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Cooking Level: Expert

Home Town: The Woodlands, Texas, USA

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Reviewed: Jan. 22, 2014
I've been making Aunt Bill's brown candy for over 30 years; got my recipe from my late mother-in-law. We use butter, cream & pecans in our version. Forget about margarine - it's bad for you anyway. And use pecans & cream, not walnuts & milk. Also called "Oklahoma Brown Candy", "Aunt Bill's Brown Fudge", etc. I did a little research: the recipe dates as far back as the 1920s, & may be a variation on the Louisiana praline. It was frequently re-published in "The Oklahoman", and the earliest mention I found of it was in 1931, in The Oklahoman's "Aunt Susan" column, by Susan Elliott. "Aunt Susan" mentions her Aunt Bill, so perhaps she really was Susan's aunt.
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Reviewed: Dec. 28, 2013
I just made this and it is delicious and turned out great! Since pecans are so expensive, I only committed to making half a batch of the candy. I didn't have any heavy cream on hand so I substituted 3/4 cup milk and 1/3 cup butter. I cooked the two together on low heat in a pan until the butter melted into them milk and poured it in the recipe. My candy thermometer is MIA so after testing it about 5 times in cold water, I cooked it until the soft ball stage which worked just fine. Aunt Bill must not have had an electric mixer but I do. To heck with mixing this with a wooden spoon! I used my mixer and beat the mixture on low until the gloss went away in just a few minutes. When it came time to put the concoction in the pan, I put butter on my hands and stuffed it into the pan and made the top look smooth and creamy. This is a hit with my family. Thank you! :0)
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Reviewed: Feb. 8, 2013
I followed the instructions... but I find the part about when to stop stirring a little vague. After staring at the inside of this pot for 10 minutes, and then 15 minutes, it looks the same. I thought the gloss had gone, but since it is not hardening in the pan, nor in the fridge, I have to assume the gloss was not gone after all. I am going to try to re-heat it tomorrow and see if I can fix it by continuing to stir some more.... What would be really helpful is if someone who makes a successful batch could take the temp of the candy just before they pour it maybe? I find the taste of this to be almost identical to the "hot caramel" sauce you get at McDonalds. In fact, if this does not harden, I'm going to put it in chunks in the freezer and just microwave to a pour-able temperature and put on icecream. But if someone has an idea on how to tell "when the gloss is gone", I would love to hear from you! ridingranch@hotmail.com I stopped when it was difficult to stir because it had thickened up and it didn't look glossy anymore.
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Cooking Level: Expert

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Reviewed: Dec. 31, 2011
I can't tell you how thrilled and SURPRISED I was to see this recipe posted on your site. My mother made it every Christmas and I attempted it several times during the past 50 years, BUT, NEVER really mastered it, wanted to try it this year, but my old copy was so bad I was afraid I'd leave out a step or ingredient. Took a chance and typed it into the search here on allrecipes.com and voila! Even has the same name, which is unbelievable (it is an unusual name, right?). My adult grandson helped me with the pouring and stirring-I could not have done it without him. It turned out perfectly, just like my mother made. It's hard to describe the texture and flavor, suffice it to say, it's like nothing else, it's delicious, and worth all the work. I felt very guilty for never helping my mother, she did it all alone. I can also understand why she hoarded it until Christmas eve. When I served it at a family gathering, this year, I gave a little presentation as to how much work it was and gave my grandson, Cassidy, props for all his muscle power and encouragement. This candy is a lot like caramel, without the stickiness, fudgelike in texture, but the browned sugar flavor is prominently scrumptous. If I haven't scared you away, EVERYONE should try it! You will love it, like all my family and friends loved it! Thank you for posting it!!! I love you!!!
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Reviewed: Dec. 19, 2011
My family always makes Aunt Bill's for Christmas. It's difficult to make it come out correctly at high altitudes (above 5,000 ft), but it's always delicious!
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Reviewed: Jul. 23, 2011
This is a great Candy Recipe from Oklahoma! My mother remembers eating this as a child when my nana made it. I have a worn, newspaper copy from Ask Melba's column in the Daily Oklahoman and was hoping to find it on allrecipes where I keep all mine now. Thanks Karen Rodgers!! You made my day!
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Photo by Kellidd

Cooking Level: Intermediate

Home Town: Muskogee, Oklahoma, USA
Living In: Norman, Oklahoma, USA
Reviewed: Mar. 25, 2011
Now that I have wiped the tears away from laughing, I can type. You see, I thought this was an old "secret" family recipe. One that my mother gave to me before she died. I nearly died when I saw that my family's "secret recipe" is all over the world!!! This candy is beyond compare. I love it so much. I found a company in Austin, Texas, called " Lammes Candies " that makes this candy (or close). It, too, is divine and will suffice as a substitute if you can't make your own. When I get to heaven, I am going to have to remember to tell my mama about this.
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Cooking Level: Professional

Home Town: Spring, Texas, USA

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Reviewed: Dec. 12, 2010
These are great! They taste like carmel pecan fudge. This is the first time I've made any type of candy, and they came out great. I did only use 1 lb of pecans, and that seemed like plenty.
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Reviewed: Dec. 4, 2010
I'm so excited I found this!! We are the only family in our area that makes "Oklahoma Fudge". Good to see people in Indiana and other places east of the Mississippi have the recipe too. Can't wait to tell my Mom and Uncles about Aunt Bill's Brown Candy being a favorite of Oklahomans, great to finally get some history on it. My Grandmother made it as far back as my family could remember. My Mom finally started making it before my Grandmother died, and I am going to try my hand at it this year. All of the tips and advice are right on the money, and believe you me there was always a lot of talk about the process. I would add that cooking is chemistry and all the steps need to be followed carefully. If the recipe says 242 degrees - do it. If you have to beat it for 15 minutes, do it. My Grandmother always had to "recover" from making Oklahoma Fudge. Also, never make it on a day when there is moisture in the air - it won't set properly. So if it's raining or on the humid side - put it off. My family shipped a pound to my brother in the first Iraq war and he and a buddy ate themselves sick on it. I never liked it until I was in my 30's, I think it was just too strong for my young taste buds and I preferred other things. Now I can't get enough of it. It is a carmellized sugar candy, not a fudge, but that's just what we always called it - fudge. It's so exciting to see it!! Missing my Grandmother.
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Cooking Level: Intermediate

Home Town: Golconda, Illinois, USA
Living In: Florissant, Missouri, USA

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