Asian-Inspired Mustard Greens Recipe - Allrecipes.com
Asian-Inspired Mustard Greens Recipe
  • READY IN 30 mins

Asian-Inspired Mustard Greens

Recipe by  

"I don't know what it is about this combination of flavors, but I could eat these every day. Even though it contains the right ingredients in the right proportions for a teriyaki sauce, which is what I was aiming for originally, to describe the flavor as such would be inaccurate. I'm usually perfectly happy with this and a bowl of rice as a meal in itself, but when I'm forced to share, it pairs well with roasted chicken or just about any kind of pork."

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Ingredients Edit and Save

Original recipe makes 4 servings Change Servings
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  • PREP

    15 mins
  • COOK

    15 mins
  • READY IN

    30 mins

Directions

  1. Place the sesame seeds into a large skillet over medium heat, and cook and stir constantly until the seeds are toasted a golden brown and make a continuous crackling noise, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer the seeds immediately to a bowl to stop the cooking process. Set seeds aside.
  2. Place sesame oil in the hot skillet, and heat until it just begins to smoke (this should happen very fast). Place mustard greens into the hot oil, and pour in water. With a spatula, gently toss the greens until they are wilted and reduced in quantity, about 2 minutes. Mix in garlic, soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, sake, and sugar.
  3. Bring the mixture to a boil, stir until sugar has dissolved, and cover the skillet. Reduce heat to a simmer, and cook until the greens are tender, 10 to 15 minutes. If a thicker sauce is desired, remove greens with a slotted spoon, and cook the liquid down to desired thickness; return greens to the skillet, toss in the pan juices, and sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds.
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Footnotes

  • Cook's Note
  • Mirin vinegar is mild. Another mild vinegar (apple cider vinegar is great) can be substituted, but may slightly affect the flavor. Sake is rice wine. There are cooking varieties, but table sake works just as well in this. Sherry is a common substitute, but any not-too-grapey white to blush wine will work as well in this. If desired, minced ginger and/or red pepper flakes can be added with the garlic. I don't care for ginger, but I'm assured it's delicious in this.
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Reviews More Reviews

Most Helpful Positive Review
Nov 16, 2011

I accidentally bought Mustard Greens instead of Kale (I thought they looked rather light in color). I've never had M.G. They are a bit spicy raw, so I hunted for a recipe to cook them with the hopes that they would taste good. This recipe caught my eye. Simple and surprisingly delicious. I mixed in a little Aji Nori Furikake (seasoned green seaweed and sesame seeds). I will mix this with rice and have for dinner tomorrow. I did not have Sake, so I used a little White Wine Vinegar.

 
Most Helpful Critical Review
Jan 30, 2012

The spiciness of raw mustard greens reminds me of wasabi, so I thought this would be intresting to try with the Asian twist. The spiciness mellows to almost nothing. The greens got to bitter for me. I love kale and thought this would be a nice change. I still like kale better and maybe will try this recipe with kale. I paired it with some edamame rice for a nice meatless meal.

 

16 Ratings

May 17, 2012

Our supermarket didn't have mustard greens, so I made this with collards, instead. Fantastic!

 
Oct 02, 2011

Delicious!

 
Oct 13, 2013

The very best recipe for greens I've ever tried. I made black mustard greens from our farmer's market as a side dish tonight with a shrimp fried rice main. This recipe is wonderful. I would note, though, that Mirin is sweetened rice wine, not rice wine vinegar. I did use it (rather than rice vinegar) and we liked the mellow smoothness it added. Using regular rice wine vinegar would result is something more tart.

 
Feb 17, 2013

I'm trying to expand my "like" list of vegetables beyond spinach, pickles, and green beans. This was a success! If you need more kick, add more garlic - I added an extra teaspoon. I will use this recipe again with mustard greens, but I think it would also be great with kale, collards, and other greens. Yum!

 
Jun 24, 2012

I'm usually not a fan of mustard greens because of the bitterness, but this is how I always fix them now. Great recipe! My 1 year-old really likes them too!

 
Feb 26, 2012

This a great recipe. I used wild mustard from the nearby orange groves so it was fairly hot. Doubling the sugar helped. This recipe would probably be awesome with mild mustard greens.

 

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Nutrition

  • Calories
  • 54 kcal
  • 3%
  • Carbohydrates
  • 6.3 g
  • 2%
  • Cholesterol
  • 0 mg
  • 0%
  • Fat
  • 2.5 g
  • 4%
  • Fiber
  • 3.1 g
  • 12%
  • Protein
  • 3 g
  • 6%
  • Sodium
  • 247 mg
  • 10%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

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About the Cook

 
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