Anise Overnight Cookies Recipe Reviews - Allrecipes.com (Pg. 1)
Reviewed: Jun. 1, 2013
These are traditional with my family. We call them Grossmutter's anise drops, but the recipe is the same. To the person who said sometime they don't set up, I know what you mean. We have found you must use room temperature eggs, and don't make when the weather is very humid. Sort of like candy making in humid weather doesn't work. It's so muggy here in the summer, these are a winter time only project.
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Reviewed: Dec. 19, 2009
I have a similar family recipe. Some years, the cookies don't harden overnight, and when baked, come out more like a sponge. Still tasty, but just not the same. any suggestions? maggie k.
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Reviewed: Jan. 5, 2008
I am trying to find a recipe for anise cookies that were like the ones my Grandma made for my Dad. My Grandma called them "rocks" I guess cause they were hard as rocks. My Dad likes them dunked in coffee. He said these were close, but remembers them w/some kind of glaze. I thought these were good, but will have to alter this one a bit or continue my search. But these were good.
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Cooking Level: Expert

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Reviewed: Jan. 24, 2007
These were really good, like peppernuts without all the work.
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Reviewed: Jan. 4, 2007
Great recipe! I've tried it with lemon extract also, instead of the anise, but the anise is the traditional (and most popular here.) When I make them, I always line the cookie sheets with aluminum foil, but it's important to put the shiny side down so that the cookie sits on the dull side. Otherwise, the shiny aluminum will reflect too much heat and burn the cookies. If you do this, you don't need to grease your sheets and the cookies will easily peel off the foil once they're cool. Thanks for sharing a great old recipe.
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Photo by SUGARPLUMSCOOKIES

Cooking Level: Professional

Living In: Wilmington, Delaware, USA
Reviewed: Dec. 23, 2006
This recipe is okay, but once the cookies are baked and cooled, after they hit air, they turn solid as a rock.
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Photo by Lucy Strebel

Cooking Level: Expert

Living In: Oakland, California, USA

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Reviewed: Dec. 8, 2006
These are also calll Dresden drops or anislaibschen. My recipe tells you to let them dry out for 12-18 hours at room temperature until hard crusts form on top. When you bake them the tops should be very light colored and they should puff up so they have a second layer on the bottom. We always refer to the as "double top" cookies. They store in an airtight container for a long time so you can make them ahead at Christmas time.
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Reviewed: Dec. 7, 2006
This is a fabulous recipe. I have been making these for years. Very simple to make. I use a pastry tube to put them on the cookie sheet. It's faster and not as messy. The drying overnight allows for the cookie to develop a crust on top so it crisps when baking. Looks kind of like a stubby mushroom after it is baked. Texture will harden as the day goes by. Reminds me of a German Springerle cookie.
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Reviewed: Nov. 30, 2005
We have made this recipe for as long as I have been alive. One thing though. Use Anise seed instead of extracts or oils. This makes the flavor more intense. And for those who like to experiment. You can substitute the Anise with Vanilla beans...Or Almond Extract. WOW....
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Reviewed: Aug. 6, 2005
This recipe is excellent. The texture of the cookies if very light and airy (presumably from all the beating). I used more anise extract, 1 tsp and was pleased with the results.
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