Beaten Biscuits

Beaten Biscuits

6

"This is the traditional biscuit of the ham-loving South. In days gone by, these were made by beating the dough until it blistered (about 15-30 minutes). It was then baked, and each biscuit sliced in half to receive a paper-thin slice of incredible salt cured ham. Today, you could use the food processor or a biscuit brake (usually nothing more than a converted washing wringer) to make the dough "snap.""
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Ingredients

40 m servings 67 cals
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Original recipe yields 24 servings

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Nutrition

  • Calories:
  • 67 kcal
  • 3%
  • Fat:
  • 2.9 g
  • 4%
  • Carbs:
  • 8.9g
  • 3%
  • Protein:
  • 1.2 g
  • 2%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 4 mg
  • 1%
  • Sodium:
  • 31 mg
  • 1%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Nutritional Information

1 Serving
Servings Per Recipe:
Amount Per Serving
  • * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
  • ** Nutrient information is not available for all ingredients. Amount is based on available nutrient data.
  • (-) Information is not currently available for this nutrient. If you are following a medically restrictive diet, please consult your doctor or registered dietitian before preparing this recipe for personal consumption.

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Directions

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  1. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C).
  2. Sift flour, salt, baking powder, and sugar together. Use a fork to "cut" the lard into the flour until it looks like coarse meal. Using a standing mixer, or a wooden spoon, mix the dough as you slowly add the cream. Mix well to form the dough into a ball, adding water if needed.
  3. Place the dough onto a tabletop, and knead slightly. With a mallet or a one-piece rolling pin, beat the dough a few times to form it into a rough rectangle. Fold the dough over, and then beat it out again. Repeat this process until the dough becomes white and blisters form on the surface, about 15 minutes.
  4. Roll out the dough to about 1/4 inch thick. Cut into 2 inch rounds, and prick the top a few times with the tines of a fork. Place on greased baking sheets.
  5. Bake for 15 minutes, or until golden.

Reviews

6
  1. 7 Ratings

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Most helpful positive review

I am dying to find a biscuit brake! In case I find a wringer washer how do I convert it?

Most helpful critical review

"Beaten biscuits" were beaten because there was no baking powder or baking soda to be the leavening agent. So, you beat the dough to cause it to blister or rise. Also, water was never in them an...

"Beaten biscuits" were beaten because there was no baking powder or baking soda to be the leavening agent. So, you beat the dough to cause it to blister or rise. Also, water was never in them an...

I am dying to find a biscuit brake! In case I find a wringer washer how do I convert it?

Beaten biscuits aren't supposed to be fluffy! They are more like crackers. The photo looks about right.

This recipe didn't work very well for me. Maybe I didn't beat the dough enough...anyway, the dough didn't rise and the biscuits were rather flat. The taste was good, but I was expecting these am...

i am 99% sure if i remember correctly there are only 3 ingredients in the original beaten biscuits and that would be the flour lard and i think butter the baking powder was left out and when you...

My husband calls these "hard tack" but my family LOVES beaten biscuit and ham. They are also good toasted with butter and jam. They will NEVER rise like regular biscuit - that's what makes the...