Microwave Mochi

Microwave Mochi

47
DINKYPIE 0

"A microwavable form of the Japanese dessert made with sweet rice flour. More varied and interesting flavors are available as well."
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Ingredients

15 m servings 83 cals
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Original recipe yields 25 servings

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Nutrition

  • Calories:
  • 83 kcal
  • 4%
  • Fat:
  • 0.1 g
  • < 1%
  • Carbs:
  • 19.9g
  • 6%
  • Protein:
  • 0.6 g
  • 1%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 0 mg
  • 0%
  • Sodium:
  • 23 mg
  • < 1%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Nutritional Information

1 Serving
Servings Per Recipe:
Amount Per Serving
  • * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
  • ** Nutrient information is not available for all ingredients. Amount is based on available nutrient data.
  • (-) Information is not currently available for this nutrient. If you are following a medically restrictive diet, please consult your doctor or registered dietitian before preparing this recipe for personal consumption.

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Directions

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  1. In a medium bowl, mix together the mochiko, 1 cup of sugar, and water until well blended. Mix in the 2 drops of vinegar to soften. Pour into a microwave-safe dish, and loosely cover with plastic. Microwave for 8 to 10 minutes on HIGH. Remove, and let cool until cool enough to handle.
  2. In a small bowl, combine the potato starch, 1/4 cup sugar, and salt. Turn the mochi out onto the plastic, and cut into pieces using a plastic or wooden knife. Metal knives tend to stick too much. Roll the pieces in the potato starch mixture.

Footnotes

  • Tip
  • Aluminum foil can be used to keep food moist, cook it evenly, and make clean-up easier.

Reviews

47
  1. 56 Ratings

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Most helpful positive review

I've tried several mochi recipes (steaming, cooking in balls in boiling water) to make for a Girl Scout event. Of the three recipes I've tried, I found this one is the best. I lived in Japan f...

Most helpful critical review

it was pretty good, but i found that halving the sugar in the mochi itself and not putting any in the starch was better. i didn't have potato starch, so i used tapioca starch instead.

I've tried several mochi recipes (steaming, cooking in balls in boiling water) to make for a Girl Scout event. Of the three recipes I've tried, I found this one is the best. I lived in Japan f...

this was tasty and the texture was just like in the stores but, beware your cooking times. the first batch i made ended up with a hard top layer because i micro-waved it for too long. to add som...

When I first started making it, it was a pasty liquid so I thought I might have done something wrong, but alas! it's supposed to be like that! it will harden as it cooks, so I just thought I wou...

it was pretty good, but i found that halving the sugar in the mochi itself and not putting any in the starch was better. i didn't have potato starch, so i used tapioca starch instead.

Cook in increments of two mintues and turn it each time or you will get hard mochi on the edges. Hard mochi=not tasty

Great recipe. You can also use a pizza cutter to slice up the mochi. I simply dusted a cutting board with potato starch, "peeled" the mochi onto the board from an 8x8 pyrex, dusted it with more...

This is really good, as good as the store bought chinese mochi. I don't eat a lot of sweet, so I reduced so sugar, still too sweet for me. I added some mugwort herb and red beans paste as the fi...

This worked really well. I didn't have potato starch so I mixed 1 cup shredded coconut w/ 1/8 cup sugar and a pinch of salt. I also added green food coloring.

This recipe is pretty darned good and very easy. For traditional mochi to serve with azuki beans, I would decrease the sugar, even by half. I added a few drops of canola oil and a few drops of...