Norwegian Lefse

Norwegian Lefse

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"I was raised on Lefse as a special treat for the holidays. We still make it every holiday season, and this is the best recipe ever. We eat ours with butter and sugar. Note: you will need a potato ricer to prepare this recipe."
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2 h servings 376 cals
Serving size has been adjusted!

Original recipe yields 15 servings



  • Calories:
  • 376 kcal
  • 19%
  • Fat:
  • 7.5 g
  • 12%
  • Carbs:
  • 71.3g
  • 23%
  • Protein:
  • 6.9 g
  • 14%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 19 mg
  • 6%
  • Sodium:
  • 524 mg
  • 21%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Nutritional Information

1 Serving
Servings Per Recipe:
Amount Per Serving
  • * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
  • ** Nutrient information is not available for all ingredients. Amount is based on available nutrient data.
  • (-) Information is not currently available for this nutrient. If you are following a medically restrictive diet, please consult your doctor or registered dietitian before preparing this recipe for personal consumption.


  • Prep

  • Cook

  • Ready In

  1. Cover potatoes with water and cook until tender. Run hot potatoes through a potato ricer. Place into a large bowl. Beat butter, cream, salt, and sugar into the hot riced potatoes. Let cool to room temperature.
  2. Stir flour into the potato mixture. Pull off pieces of the dough and form into walnut size balls. Lightly flour a pastry cloth and roll out lefse balls to 1/8 inch thickness.
  3. Cook on a hot (400 degree F/200 C) griddle until bubbles form and each side has browned. Place on a damp towel to cool slightly and then cover with damp towel until ready to serve.


  1. 59 Ratings

Most helpful positive review

This is the real deal. It is important to make sure the potatoes are cold before adding the flour and other ingredients and be sure to keep the uncooked lefsa cold before rolling out. I also use...

Most helpful critical review

Um, you need at least 2 more cups of flour for this recipe. My dough turned out wetter than cookies dough. Stuck to my fingers like mad. Tasted good...once I added 2 more cups of flour.

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This is the real deal. It is important to make sure the potatoes are cold before adding the flour and other ingredients and be sure to keep the uncooked lefsa cold before rolling out. I also use...

This is the closest to my mom's recipe that I have seen. One suggestion I would make is if you are not eating it right away (we make 20 lbs. of potatos at a time and freeze it) cool your lefse ...

I have been looking for a lefse recipe for over a year. Well no more this is the one I will use forever. My 81 year old father in-law said it was just like his mother used to make. And I found i...

This recipe was terrific! I love making lefse and this was one of the best I have tried, in fact I have decided that in the future this is the only recipe I will use. I am all Norwegian so it's...

I made this recipe last year for my family at Christmas. My grandpa was 100% Norwegian. He has passed away, but my grandma tried the lefse from this recipe and said it tasted just like the lefse...

This is an authentic recipe for lefse, very similar to my Norwegen Mother in Law's. The flour amount is correct, it is scant because it takes into account that quite a bit of extra flour is nee...

Perfect lefse! I've been looking for a good lefse recipe for a long time, and this one has the most traditional taste and texture. Wonderful!

I grew up in a Norwegian family where we ate lefse 3 times a day for the whole Christmas season! My mom & I make lefse every year. We're always frustrated with our recipe not rolling out properl...

Thank you for sharing such a wonderful recipe. I had lost my recipe for Lefse when my mother past away. Now I will be able to carry on the tradition. Thank you!!!!

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