Corned Venison

Corned Venison

Emily Tisdale 11

"This is a delicious way to utilize the shoulders of deer or elk. The process takes a little time but is well worth it. The curing gets rid of the gamey flavor of the venison. You may add one tablespoon of pickling spice if desired for a more intense flavor."
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5 d 4 h 50 m servings 135 cals
Serving size has been adjusted!

Original recipe yields 20 servings



  • Calories:
  • 135 kcal
  • 7%
  • Fat:
  • 2.3 g
  • 3%
  • Carbs:
  • 5.8g
  • 2%
  • Protein:
  • 21.5 g
  • 43%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 79 mg
  • 26%
  • Sodium:
  • 2136 mg
  • 85%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Nutritional Information

1 Serving
Servings Per Recipe:
Amount Per Serving
  • * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
  • ** Nutrient information is not available for all ingredients. Amount is based on available nutrient data.
  • (-) Information is not currently available for this nutrient. If you are following a medically restrictive diet, please consult your doctor or registered dietitian before preparing this recipe for personal consumption.

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  • Prep

  • Cook

  • Ready In

  1. Bring 2 cups of water to a boil in a saucepan over high heat. Stir in the curing mixture, brown sugar, pickling spice, and garlic powder; stir until dissolved then remove from the heat. Pour 6 cups of cold water into a 2-gallon container, and stir in the spice mixture. Place the boneless venison into the brine, cover and refrigerate.
  2. Leave the venison in the refrigerator to brine for 5 days, turning the meat over every day.
  3. To cook, rinse the meat well, place into a large pot, and cover with water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer for 4 hours. Remove the venison from the pot, and allow to rest for 30 minutes before slicing.


  • Cook's Note
  • You may freeze uncooked corned venison by placing the desired amounts in vacuum sealable bags. Do not rinse meat before freezing, but remove excess liquid before sealing.



This was easy, and when I got done it tasted almost like corned beef! It was amazing. I used it to make corned venison sandwiches. I would use it any way you would use corned beef.

Very good recipe I have made corned venison for years with almost the same recipe.If you add salt peter the color will be neer the same as store bought corned beef.Use this same recipe then smok...

Used this last year for first time. Will use it every year !!! I made three roasts, no time to cook them so wrapped and froze. Gave to my son a few weeks later. Only got a spoon full!!!!! from t...

I use the brine recipe and then make venison pastrami. After the 5 days, rinse the meat under cold water, pat dry. Use your hands to smear the roast with whole grain mustard. Shake on an even co...

I followed this recipe to a T up to the cooking method. I chose to cook mine in a slow cooker instead of the boiling method but only to play it safe. I have never boiled corned beef and didn't w...

This is the best venison recipe that I have ever eaten.

Tried this last week...tastes just like corned beef!! I did the refrigeration out in the garage and with freezing temps, the center of the roast froze and didn't turn the red color. I'll be doin...

I have made this 3 times. It is a great way to use venison roast. We make Reuben sandwiches with it. yummy!

My husband's a hunter. It's hard for me to find recipes to use with what he brings home. I'm not crazy about game. I always keep the recipes that "fool" me into forgetting that I'm eating: deer,...