Deer Ribs

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chad & nikki 0

"Foolproof method for a tasty part of the deer many hunters ignore."
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18 h 15 m servings 547 cals
Serving size has been adjusted!

Original recipe yields 6 servings



  • Calories:
  • 547 kcal
  • 27%
  • Fat:
  • 9.6 g
  • 15%
  • Carbs:
  • 16.3g
  • 5%
  • Protein:
  • 88 g
  • 176%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 318 mg
  • 106%
  • Sodium:
  • 1077 mg
  • 43%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Nutritional Information

1 Serving
Servings Per Recipe:
Amount Per Serving
  • * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
  • ** Nutrient information is not available for all ingredients. Amount is based on available nutrient data.
  • (-) Information is not currently available for this nutrient. If you are following a medically restrictive diet, please consult your doctor or registered dietitian before preparing this recipe for personal consumption.

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  • Prep

  • Cook

  • Ready In

  1. Preheat oven to 200 degrees F (95 degrees C).
  2. Pour vinegar and beer into a large roasting pan. Add the celery, carrots, peppers, garlic, and onion. Rub the venison ribs with Cajun seasoning, salt and pepper to taste. Place ribs in roasting pan and cover with a tight fitting lid or aluminum foil.
  3. Bake in preheated oven for 18 hours, or until the meat is falling off of the bone.



Great recipe. The only change was the use of a Memphis Rib Rub in lieu of the cajun seasoning. Otherwise, I followed the recipe exactly and the ribs turned out great!

Great recipe. I followed the recipe as stated, but added half of a banana pepper to give it a kick and would strongly suggest doing this for anyone else thinking of trying these. I also added L...

I used chops as I did not get ribs from my deer. I can only imagine how amazing the ribs would be. The chops were pretty good. The apple vinegar adds a nice tartness to the vegetables and meat. ...

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