Pork and Century Egg Rice Congee

Pork and Century Egg Rice Congee

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Lea Eats 1

"This traditional Chinese breakfast rice porridge is filling, cheap, warming, and oh so good. I like my rice well broken down and therefore use a short-grain rice and a longer cooking time. I hope you enjoy! Serve hot in small bowls, garnished with a drop of oyster sauce, chopped scallion greens, and small slices of yau ja gwai (fried chinese bread stick, or chinese crullers)."
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3 h 30 m servings 174 cals
Serving size has been adjusted!

Original recipe yields 8 servings



  • Calories:
  • 174 kcal
  • 9%
  • Fat:
  • 5 g
  • 8%
  • Carbs:
  • 15.8g
  • 5%
  • Protein:
  • 15.6 g
  • 31%
  • Cholesterol:
  • 92 mg
  • 31%
  • Sodium:
  • 220 mg
  • 9%

Based on a 2,000 calorie diet

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Nutritional Information

1 Serving
Servings Per Recipe:
Amount Per Serving
  • * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
  • ** Nutrient information is not available for all ingredients. Amount is based on available nutrient data.
  • (-) Information is not currently available for this nutrient. If you are following a medically restrictive diet, please consult your doctor or registered dietitian before preparing this recipe for personal consumption.


  • Prep

  • Cook

  • Ready In

  1. Rinse the rice in several changes of cold water. Drain completely in a mesh strainer and place into a large pot. Stir the vegetable oil into the rice and set aside for 10 minutes.
  2. Stir 6 cups of water, the bouillon cube, char siu, and green onion into the rice. Bring to a boil over high heat; reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer 1 1/2 hours. Stir frequently as the rice cooks to help break the rice grains apart and keep it from burning on the bottom.
  3. Stir in the remaining 2 cups of water and the century egg. Continue cooking another 1 1/2 hours, stirring frequently until the congee reaches your desired consistency. The congee is ready when the individual grains of rice are no longer discernable and have thickened the soup.


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The best congee that I've made ever. I managed to find the char siu at my favorite asian market. They have it delivered once a week and saved some for me. The owner said it goes out fast and he ...

This recipe isn't exactly traditional Congee. While Congee can have anything in it, I prefer to keep it simple, especially pork and century egg congee. I would use the same amount of rice and w...

yummy! Feels good in the tummy on a cold night in Paris.

Delicious! But the oil is unecessary. Still a very good recipe and will definitely make again!

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