Rhubarb: The Pie Plant Article - Allrecipes.com
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Rhubarb: The Pie Plant

Rhubarb may be a vegetable, but we mostly treat it like a fruit, its tart taste being the perfect foil for strawberries and other sweet fruits.




Temper the Tartness

Often too tart on its own, rhubarb pairs wonderfully with other fruits to create a complex sweet-tart flavor. Berries, apples, oranges, and peaches are all good choices.


The Pie Plant

Try substituting up to half of the fruit in your favorite dessert recipe with chopped rhubarb (you may need to add extra sugar). Looking for more flavorful ideas? Rhubarb is also complemented by ginger, vanilla, cinnamon, orange, lime and mint.


Other Rhubarb Treats

Apart from pies, tarts, crisps and cobblers, rhubarb is wonderful in quick breads, cakes, ice cream or sorbet. Rhubarb sauces or chutneys can be matched with both sweet and savory dishes.


Picking and Preparing Your Rhubarb


Different varieties of rhubarb will be deep crimson, rosy pink, or even pink-streaked green when fully ripe. If you're selecting rhubarb in the grocery store, choose medium-sized stalks that are firm and blemish-free. Avoid anything that's limp, shriveled or spotted brown. Rhubarb stalks are stringy like celery; the texture will break down during cooking, so de-stringing is not necessary.


    Storing Tips: Save It for Later


    Fresh rhubarb will keep for up to a week if you store it carefully. Wrap it tightly in plastic, put it in the refrigerator, and don't wash it until you're ready to use it.

    If you've got a bumper crop of rhubarb and want to freeze it to use year-round, prepare it by washing and cutting it into 1-inch pieces. Drop the pieces into boiling water for one minute, and then stop the cooking by "shocking" it: scoop rhubarb out with a slotted spoon or sieve and plunge it immediately into ice water. Drain the cooled rhubarb pieces, spread them out on baking sheets and transfer them to the freezer. Once the rhubarb is frozen solid, you can store it in heavy-duty plastic bags for up to a year.

    Or bake fresh rhubarb into coffee cakes, muffins, sauces and the like, and freeze it in ready-to-eat forms instead.

    Comments
    Dec. 24, 2009 10:00 pm
    I'd always heard of rhubarb pies, but in Texas it's too hot for the plants. My Minnesotan husband introduced me to this most lovely springtime vegetable that makes great sweet-tart pies. Now I look forward to it every year!
     
    gwen 
    Mar. 14, 2010 12:39 pm
    I have a huge rhubarb plant that I want to divide into other plants. How do I do this? I don't want to kill the mother plant.
     
    Apr. 5, 2010 5:35 am
    Hi Gwen! I live in Belgium and we have had a rhubarb plant in our backyard for ages. Every now and then, we just split it up and give it a different spot. Rhubarb is strong. It will survive. Enjoy
     
    Apr. 7, 2010 1:18 pm
    I love rhubarb weather it is raw, cooked in jam or baked into something. I am wondering what the nutritional value of rhubarb is? Is it high in vit c or some other vitamins?
     
    Apr. 8, 2010 5:09 am
    Rhubarb is a part of my childhood memories. My Finnish grandmother used to make strawberry-rhubarb pudding, or, sometimes, just plain rhubarb pudding, and I remember how much sugar she needed to add to the rhubarb to make it palatable. She usually used kosher potato starch as a thickener for the pudding, although as I recall, I think she also sometimes used tapioca, which I particularly liked. Good stuff!
     
    Apr. 8, 2010 2:14 pm
    My mom would stew cut rhubarb, sugar and alittle water. All us kids loved it.My sister from Tenn., always ask if I have any ready when she comes home to Pa.
     
    Mrs. Borum 
    Apr. 9, 2010 8:26 am
    Hi Sheila! Here is the info I found on rhubarb's nutritional value: Nutrition Facts: Rhubarb Serving Size 1 cup, diced (122.0 g) 1 stalk (51.0 g) Amount Per Serving Calories 26 Calories from Fat 2 % Daily Value* Total Fat 0.2g0% Saturated Fat 0.1g0% Polyunsaturated Fat 0.1g Monounsaturated Fat 0.0g Cholesterol 0mg0% Sodium 5mg0% Total Carbohydrates 5.5g2% Dietary Fiber 2.2g9% Sugars 1.3g Protein 1.1g Vitamin A 2% • Vitamin C 16% Calcium 10% • Iron 1% * Based on a 2000 calorie diet As you can see, it is VERY high in Vitamin C. It's also high in Calcium, Potassium, Magnesium, Manganese & Dietary Fiber. Caloriecount.com gives it an "A"!
     
    deb 
    Apr. 19, 2010 4:45 pm
    Iv'e frozen rhubarb in the past, does anyone have any good suggestions on the best way to freeze, don't have time to deal with it right now but I also dont want to lose it either
     
    BPEK 
    Apr. 20, 2010 6:40 pm
    around here Mn & WI rhubatb is eaten raw often but usually by kids. some eat it w/ sugar & some sprinkle salt on it. I ate two pieces today /w salt. I'm 68 yrs old & grew up eating it. But I love it as sauce , on ice cream, in pie or a cake. It's wonderful. I just this year harvested a few stalks from my relatively young plant.Plan to get enough for a pie soon.
     
    sheila 
    Apr. 21, 2010 7:36 am
    Hi Linda A. -- the tapioca your Grandma made with the rice pudding is called Riisipuuro - or at least in my Finnish family's cookbook :) - we make the riisipuuro and add cooked berries/rhubarb/ all kinds of wonderful additions for a beautiful dessert! (or breakfast if you hold back on the sugar) :) we put the almond in the riisipuuru and the one who finds it has good luck.. I generally cook down my rhubarb on the stove adding sugar to taste and thicken with a bit of corn starch - then pour ofver the riisipuuro - HEAVEN,
     
    graham072442@yahoo.com 
    Apr. 21, 2010 10:55 am
    If you have pets and plan on growing rhubarb in a family garden, you should be sure your pets don't try to eat it. I'm not sure of the truth of the matter, but I was always told as I grew up that raw rhubarb could poison dogs and cats - particularly the roots of the plant. I haven't investigated that claim, but I've been told it for more than 60 years.
     
    Apr. 22, 2010 3:55 pm
    Graham: the wives tales are correct. Rhubarb contains oxalic acid in all parts of the plant but it is the leaves that contain the most poison. According to the website http://www.rhubarbinfo.com/rhubarb-poison.html someone would have to eat about 11 lbs of leaves to die from the toxins in rhubarb. It takes less than that to show signs of sickness (no info really given on exactly how much to get sick). Granted pets are a smaller than humans, but they would still have to ingest A LOT of rhubarb (leaves, stems and roots) to get sick.
     
    Apr. 22, 2010 4:02 pm
    As to dividing rhubarb, I usually do it at the beginning of the season before the leaves start shooting up. My rhubarb is a very old one, coming from South Dakota in the 1930's to Boise ID. It has been divided many, many, many times. My current plant was a start I got from my mother in law about 15 years ago. I just dig up a part with my spade and hand it off to friends who want their own plant. I have divided my plant in my yard at least 15 times in the past 10 years and it is still going strong. My husband even accidentally sprayed it with Roundup and it didn't die. You can also dip your start in rooting hormone (like Rootone) before you plant the offshoot.
     
    Susan 
    May 11, 2010 7:48 am
    Are you kidding? Hardly ever eaten raw! Here in Upstate NY that is the way most everyone loves it in the spring. Then we use it for baking.Pull it from the plant,cut off the large leaf, peel off the red skin on the stalk then get a salt shaker and sprinkle some on the stalk and yum. But be careful, too much raw will give you many hurried trips to the bathroom! LOL
     
    JoAnn 
    May 15, 2010 7:39 am
    Is Rhubarb supposed to flower before you harvest any?
     
    Karen 
    May 20, 2010 2:55 pm
    Karen I always loved rhubarb pie, and the only variation was strawberry-rhubarb when I was growing up. A few years ago I discovered a recipe for raspberry-rhubarb pie and it is my new favorite. I simply toss the contents of a small container of raspberries from the produce section of the store over the top of the pie before setting the top crust in place. Great combination!
     
    MissMissy 
    Jun. 5, 2010 4:17 pm
    JoAnn-- Nope. It's best to eat before it flowers--it can turn a bit bitter otherwise. To extend the crop, you should cut the flower stalks off when you see them.
     
    Julie 
    Jul. 18, 2010 6:29 pm
    My mom has a green rhubarb plant. We bought some red to mix in for a pie, but now we have enough to use, but it's green. I don't know if I can get past the color. If I add red food color would that help or would I get a sick brown color? I just don't know about a green pie!
     
    CCS 
    Jul. 19, 2010 10:25 pm
    Julie, I have a rhubarb plant that is of the greener variety, too (it never gets very red, only a bit red at the base of the stems.) I'm pretty sure our type of green rhubarb won't ever make as pretty recipes as the redder varieties, but the wonderful taste makes up for the green color, I think! I add red food coloring to just about every recipe when I use this rhubarb (unless I'm also using lots of other pretty-colored berries, like strawberries, blackberries etc. along with it that will color the food naturally.) I use at least 3 or 4 drops of red food coloring, and it seems to do the trick most of the time, without the recipe turning ugly brown. Good luck and enjoy!!!
     
    wilma 
    Sep. 24, 2010 4:44 am
    I am looking for a strawberry and rhubarb ice box cake. Made with jello and lady fingers and rhubarb. I got it from a womans day or family circle . any help out there oh yes it was made in a spring form pan.
     
    Sep. 26, 2010 7:21 am
    You can't grow rhubarb in Louisiana apparently, and I have not been able to find any for sale. Has anyone seen any in Lafayette area?
     
    cookin4eight 
    Oct. 30, 2010 8:06 pm
    My mom used to cook it down with just a little sugar and serve it as a vegetable with our dinner. That wasn't my favorite, but I love it in desserts. To JoAnn, no you don't want it to flower until after you've picked what you can use.
     
    Reba 
    Nov. 6, 2010 2:44 pm
    langdale1@wildblue.net I live in south Georgia, I am not sure if the weather is to warm for rhubarb or not. If not, where and how do I get a start. Any suggestions!I would love to cook with it. The recipes I have read sounds very good.All help would be greatly appreciated.
     
    Tanis 
    Nov. 16, 2010 12:01 pm
    My mom would cook it down with added water, sugar and tapioca and serve over shortcakes with whip cream, so good. I like to throw manure on my plant in the late fall and let the rain do the watering, and it grows like crazy. I live in NW Oregon so we get plenty of rain, but continue to keep it well watered in the summer.
     
    SAM 
    Jan. 30, 2011 11:32 am
    Always looking forward to the first rhubarb of the season.In Ohio this is usually in April.Makes the best pies,cakes jam,
     
    kmbutch 
    Feb. 10, 2011 7:59 am
    My mom made rhubarb bread pudding & loved it she has passed so I'm trying to make it sorry I didn't pay more attention when she made it. I thought she cooked the rhubarb on the stove with sugar first before making the bread pudding. So thats my question?
     
    Nicky 
    Feb. 15, 2011 10:50 am
    I'm moving to Arizona in March from SD and will miss my rhubarb so much! I will actually have to buy it at the store.
     
    Julie 
    Apr. 7, 2011 9:54 pm
    Late spring/early summer in MN always meant getting a cup with sugar and heading out to the rhubarb patch! I love rhubarb still and have lots of good recipes, but my favorite is my mom's rhubarb custard pie. Mom would always slightly overcook the pie so the edges of the custard became very gooey, like caramel. Yummmm!
     
    caroline5981 
    Apr. 8, 2011 12:47 pm
    Where I live in southern Wisconsin, we have a neighborhood rhubarb patch. It belonged to my neighbor and when she passed, the new owners thought about ripping it out. (scream) Luckily they left it, and there's always plenty to use fresh and freeze. I can hardly wait for the first tender stalks! Hmmmm let me get my clogs on and take a looksee!
     
    marna 
    Apr. 8, 2011 4:35 pm
    I planted my rhubarb plant last year and everything I read said to NOT harvest, etc for the first year. It's beginning to grow leaves and peak it's head out of the thawed ground. We had a really snowy winter this year but it looks like it's survived. I'm very excited since I make a yummy strawberry rhubarb pie and can hardly wait to make it with my own home grown! I think it's the red variety but no matter what I'll be using it in Spring desserts. Does it continue to grow or is it one harvest and it's done? Thanks!
     
    Sheila 
    Apr. 8, 2011 6:39 pm
    Will rhubarb grow in SC? I have not seen any around here. I used to love my Mom's rhubarb crisp made with corn flakes for a topping. She made a custard like filling with the rhubarb! YUM! Makes me homesick for Iowa. But just for the spring in Iowa - not the winter!
     
    lnjritterman 
    Apr. 8, 2011 6:43 pm
    I have a good recipe for strawberry rhubarb jam that you only have to use 1/2 the amount of sugar. 5 cups rhubarb,chopped {fresh or frozen}.Cook with one cup of water until tender. add 5 cups of sugar I use only2 1/2 cups. Cook a few minutes,stirring constantly. Add one can strawberry pie filling and cook 6-8 minutes more. Remove from heat and add two 3oz. pkgs. strawberry gelatin. Stir untill dissolved. Pour into jars and put lids on or in plastic containers. Freeze or store in refrigerator. {you can also use cherry for the flavor if you like that better}
     
    lnjritterman 
    Apr. 8, 2011 6:48 pm
    I forgot that you also need one teaspoon soda added to jam recipe above. Sorry.
     
    Sheila 
    Apr. 8, 2011 6:49 pm
    Will rhubarb grow in SC? I have not seen any around here. I used to love my Mom's rhubarb crisp made with corn flakes for a topping. She made a custard like filling with the rhubarb! YUM! Makes me homesick for Iowa. But just for the spring in Iowa - not the winter!
     
    grannyjo 
    Apr. 8, 2011 8:24 pm
    Yes, the leaves & about 1" down on the stalk are toxic to animals. Many years ago when I was young, I threw the leaves across the fence into the sheep pen and we lost several of them. My sister lives in TN and she was told it will not grow because winters don't get and stay cold enough for it to grow there. Maybe this past winter it would have. I sprinkle strawberry jello on the desserts for flavor if fresh aren't available.
     
    ImN2Art 
    Apr. 9, 2011 5:24 am
    According to the Dept. of Agriculture here in Tennessee, the southern regions are not suitable for growing rhubarb. The average summer temp. needs to be around 75 degrees.
     
    Apr. 9, 2011 8:52 am
    I'm looking for the recipe for Danish "rababakoi" (that's how it's pronounced) that my Danish mother-in-law made every year. I finally have the rhubarb plants going strong in my own yard--and I love that stuff!
     
    FLORIDA BIG DAWG!! 
    Apr. 9, 2011 10:22 am
    Hi, I remember when Mom made Rhubarb pie. I can't find the receipe for it though. It's wasn't the CHUNCKY PIE like I find here in Florida. She boiled it down and added I believe sugar, Anyone have a complete receipe for this type of RHUBARB PIE. Thank you,
     
    Apr. 9, 2011 12:49 pm
    Dear Marna, I have no problem harvesting my rhubarb all spring and then again in the fall, it's almost impossible to kill it, trust me, we've tried to get rid of one of our plants. As for not harvesting this year, go with your gut, if your plant is strong you'd probably be alright pulling off a few stems and making a small pie. If it seems weak then you should probably wait. Have fun!
     
    dmbahr 
    Apr. 10, 2011 4:32 am
    We live in Florida! How do I get fresh rhubarb in quantity to make pie filling for year-round use?
     
    WINDSTORM86 
    Apr. 14, 2011 1:06 pm
    I haven't tried it yet, but a lady suggested putting a few red hots in the rhubarb to give it a red color. Hmmm!
     
    Auntrah 
    May 2, 2011 4:38 pm
    I divided one plant by jumping up and down on a shovel. I now have more than 10 plants. I never thought that many would survive. Are there any unsweetened nondessert recipes for rhubarb? I used real maple sugar and vanilla but its still just sauce.
     
    MarciaT 
    May 25, 2011 7:21 pm
    For those in FL, we just found fresh rhubarb in our local Publix grocery store, at a hefty $4.99 per pound! The produce guy said he can order it for maybe another month or so.
     
    Fran 
    Jun. 7, 2011 6:48 am
    I planted rhubarb 3 years ago and it will not grow. This year it had a big flower grow in the middle of the plant, big and thick. I live in SW Indiana. What is wrong with this plant?
     
    Kaye 
    Jul. 20, 2011 12:18 pm
    I live in San Antonio, Texas, I'm originally from Alaska and Rhubarb grows great up there, my grand mother had several plants that we would pull off stalks and eat raw, but she made the best strawberry-rhubarb jam and pie, I can't find any in the stores here, and I'm sure it's not going to grow in the summer, but I wonder if anyone knows anyplace around here to purchase it or if it can be ordered. Thank you.
     
    candlbakker 
    Aug. 6, 2011 2:11 pm
    Rhubarb does not grow in any of the states that don't have a real winter. It has to freeze and be dormant over the winter months.
     
    candlbakker 
    Aug. 6, 2011 2:24 pm
    There is a great rhubarb cookbook available called "Ritzy Rhubarb Secrets Cookbook" that I got at a gift shop in the Badlands at Medora, ND. There are 142 pages of rhubarb recipes with everything from beverages to muffins. The ladies that made the cookbook's address is Community Cookbooks, PO Box #11, Litchville, ND 58461.
     
    sallyb 
    Sep. 9, 2011 9:11 pm
    I bought a rhubarb start at Walmart a couple of years ago. It has taken 2 years but now it is an enormous plant! We had an extra cold winter last year, so maybe that helped. I also watered the garden much more than usual this year as well. I have the green type of rhubarb. Can I harvest it in the fall as well as the spring? The giant rhubarb and I live in the colder, high deserts of New Mexico. I say, buy some and try to grow it no matter where you live; you might just luck out like I did. :)
     
    tamturn3 
    Sep. 21, 2011 8:28 pm
    I live south of Nashville in TN and have successfully grown rhubarb here. I planted it on the side of my shed where it only gets morning sun and it has done well. I have rhubarb all summer.
     
    cannonball 
    Nov. 11, 2011 11:58 am
    where can i find rhubarb plant, and when do you plant them and how do you plant them and harvest them?
     
    cannonball 
    Nov. 11, 2011 12:03 pm
    my grandma use to grow rhubard. but i have never been able to find a plant for me to try to grow. where can i find one? where do i need to plant it? and how do you harvest it, cook it and all of the other stuff. she use to make the best pies. and i have not had one in years. i really would like to try this my self for my grandma has been making pies in heaven for years.
     
    JoannieO 
    Jan. 30, 2012 3:44 am
    Hi everyone, I live in Hamilton New Zealand and we don't have freezing cold winters, but many people grow rhubarb successfully here. It doesn't seem to need a really cold winter, it just goes dormant and pops up again in spring. I planted two sets from my sister's garden about 3 years ago, and always have plenty of rhubarb to eat, freeze, and give away.
     
    elicial 
    Feb. 14, 2012 9:59 pm
    Hello Rhubarb fans. I live in Los Angeles and just harvested stalks off of 4 plants I planted as 4" pots last October. Seems that rhubarb is a winter crop here and is best treated as an annual, instead of perennial. The plants were so robust and huge, I don't have the heart to pull them out. I am going to give them another year and see if they make it through our hot, dry summer and grow more stalks next winter. Can't wait to make pies tomorrow night. Thanks for the tips on freezing. Those of you who live in warm climates, check your local nurseries in the fall.
     
    margedellwo51 
    Feb. 29, 2012 1:25 pm
    My sister can't grow it in the mountains north of Atlanta in Georgia.
     
    mom2darcy 
    Apr. 17, 2012 10:26 am
    Tip for freezing, my family has been growing and freezing rhubarb for 50+ years and we never blanch it. Quickest method is to wash cut in one inch pieces and then freeze. I normally freeze it 4cups at a time in a heavy duty freezer bag. This way when my family is craving rhubarb pie or crumble in January I just grab a bag most of my recipes use 4 cups. just increase your cooking time by 5 to 10 min to allow for frozen fruit.
     
    nancy 
    Apr. 18, 2012 3:20 pm
    Add 1/2 C red hot candy to rhubarb pie. My grandmother added red hots in her rhubarb pie and I loved it when I was a kid, now friends & family enjoy my red hot rhubarb pies.
     
    suz 
    Apr. 22, 2012 2:30 pm
    I've been using Allrecipes for a few years now and have never figured out how to save articles like this - the whole article. Can someone tell me if that's possible and how to do it if so. Thanks! (There's good stuff here and I want to save it all - but preferably not piecemeal.)
     
    John R 
    Apr. 28, 2012 1:14 pm
    i grow rhubarb in foothills NW NC,grows well in spring, when gets above 80 deg. stops growing, but when cools off in fall, restarts growing a little bit, not like it does in spring, for those further south you can try to grow as annual, plant late winter, when big enough, harvest all you can, then replant every year
     
    Fran 
    Apr. 28, 2012 4:20 pm
    My parents bought a farm in 1945 in SW PA and there were rhubarb plants in the garden. I remember all of my life my Dad being the one to "push" my Mom into baking rhubarb pies & jam. I do not recall him ever eating it raw. I do recall my aunts making visits "purposefully" because the rhubarb "was ready". How wonderful these memories are, and how wonderful to see this chain of emails hearing others recipes and memories, as well. I must say, I am married 38 yrs, and never made rhubarb in my own home.....my sons (33 and 26) never heard of it. But today, if my Mom were living, she would be 97 yrs old. Something triggered a memory of her strawberry-rhubarb pie.....I went out & bought rhubarb and upon arriving home realized I never knew how she made it. So this got me on this very enjoyable journey of the email discussion of rhubarb fans....I am so glad I logged on!!
     
    KRHERBERT 
    Apr. 28, 2012 5:37 pm
    All this talk about rhubarb. I grew up in Illinois, and it was a spring ritual. My mother's recipe is long lost, but on a whim thought I'd ask (especially those who have the rhubarb cookbook mentioned above). I seem to remember my mother adding crushed graham crackers into the rhubarb mix when making pies. Anyone have a recipe (there are none listed on this website) adding graham cracker crumbs to the mix?
     
    carol 
    Apr. 29, 2012 3:59 pm
    Moved last August into a new rental home (lost our house in the "new economy") -- a farmhouse on a couple acres. Just discovered a huge rhubarb plant growing in the unkempt part of the yard near the barn! Woo-hoo, it's freezing time, and pies and jams galore!
     
    tami 
    May 3, 2012 9:17 pm
    Kaye, I also live in San Antonio, Texas. I am a transplant from upper Indiana. I brought 3 plants with me, and 2 have survived. So far this year I've made 2 pies and just picked enough to make 2 more. I planted mine under a small tree. This is their first year, I hope they survive the entire year.
     
    May 10, 2012 8:48 am
    Hi everyone- I live in NE TX and am having wonderful luck growing VICTORIA rhubarb from root stock which is hardy to zone 8. Some are in full sun with my blueberry bushes in raised beds (these seem the happiest) some are potted in part sun, and some receive only afternoon sun. They are all thriving. You can buy the root stock online or from Tractor Supply in very early spring. Don't harvest the first year- it's so tempting but don't do it! This gives the roots a chance to establish so that successive years will yield a great harvest. The flower stalks should be cut off because they redirect nutrients which should be going into crown and stalks. The second year you can harvest one to two stalks per plant in late spring, and the third year up to half the stalks may be harvested over an eight week period. The acid (which is highly toxic) is found mainly in the leaves...you can compost these but never ever eat them or feed to animals. Hope this is helpful to those of you who want to try
     
    hugbug56 
    Jun. 3, 2012 4:46 am
    I live in upstate NY and growing up I would visit a friend who lived with his Grandmother. She would give us stalks of rhubarb to dip in sugar as a snack...but would also put out a little plate with sugar-water on it to give the bees something to eat so as not to bother us with our snack...smart Lady...
     
    marjieb 
    Jul. 12, 2012 11:47 pm
    Wanted!!!!!!!!!!!!! Are the any recipes out there using PERSIMMONs. I have two wonderful small trees producing many fruit and I can't eat them fast enough. Help
     
    macdady 
    Jul. 30, 2012 10:45 am
    Hi you all. I am a rhubarb fanatic, I have 9 mature plants and just transplanted about 20 more this year. I hope with this hot weather here in Iowa that they survive. I just froze 55 cups last night. I make pies, cakes and even BBQ sauce. It is great on BBQ Ribs.
     
    Pat 3270 
    Aug. 1, 2012 1:55 pm
    When you cook rhubarb for sauce, add 3 tablespoons of dry jello along with suar and a little food coloring and very little water and you will be surprised at the cotton candy taste of this wonderful sauce...it thickens a little and children love it.
     
    Rennae 
    Sep. 23, 2012 4:02 pm
    I'm in eastern WA state... Mom's plant (east side of house) starts growing as soon as weather reaches about 40deg in the Springtime. Summer afternoons often are 90deg but no direct sun to rhubarb... I grab at the ground level to pull stalks once they are bigger than a pencil... and that plant produces all summer long!!! ...Slows down late Sep/early Oct when Frost comes.
     
    Rennae 
    Sep. 23, 2012 4:07 pm
    My favorite rhubarb stalk size is about an inch thick - I keep stalks in refrig in a tightly wrapped grocery plastic bag (break off and throw away leaves) until ready to clean and use. I usually cut pieces 1/4 inch thick and 1/2 wide. It's the most common size for my recipe needs.
     
    f105fww 
    Feb. 6, 2013 5:08 pm
    I grew up in Indiana. My grandmother always had plants and we would take starts with us as we moved. My mother made pies, cakes, cookies, and sauces. I liked to make a surprise muffin by pushing a piece of rhubarb into the middle of the batter before baking them. The one thing that has always stayed on my mind is the way she made the sauces. Through the year, the pans she cooked with would darken. When she made the Sauces, she would use a different pan each time. The pan would be shiny clean after the Sauce. I have since moved to Florida. I have a refrigerator in the garage to trick plants into growing where they would not normally grow. For the most part, I have been successful with this process. I am currently back in Indiana and will be taking some rhubarb back with me to try in Florida. I am sure hoping for success.
     
     
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