JOSLYN H. Recipe Reviews (Pg. 1) - Allrecipes.com (1908846)

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JOSLYN H.

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Real Homemade Tamales

Reviewed: Aug. 22, 2008
If you are going to take the time to make tamales, be sure to double or triple the recipe, the Tamales freeze well. You also want them to turn out perfectly. This is a good recipe but the instructions leave out a few important steps: (1.) One of the biggest mistakes is not mixing the masa dough long enough; this causes the tamales to fall apart. Mix the masa dough, with an ELECTRIC MIXER, until a small amount (1 tsp) floats in a cup of water. (2.) Position your corn husks with wide end toward you. Spread a thin layer of masa dough, completely covering the bottom 2/3 of the corn husks and place filling in a line down the center of the dough. (3.) You won't have to secure your Tamales with a toothpick or strip of corn husk, if folded properly. When folding, fold in one long side about 1/3 over dough and filling, fold in the other long side, overlapping the first (like folding a business letter). Fold down the top 1/3 and place in steamer standing upright, with the folded end down and open end up. Don’t over pack the pan, just tightly enough to keep Tamales in an upright position. If you don’t have a Tamale steamer you can use a deep pot with cover. Place a steamer basket in the bottom and stand your Tamales (open end up) in the basket, add water only to the bottom of the basket (you don’t want the Tamales sitting in water) cover, and steam. Check the water level during cooking, to make sure the pot doesn’t run dry.
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1694 users found this review helpful

Rick's Special Buttercream Frosting

Reviewed: Feb. 9, 2007
This is close to my own recipe but I've always used all butter. I was never quite happy with the results because the frosting was always a bit too sweet for me. Following Rick's recipe, but using half salted butter & half regular Crisco, 6 cups of confectioners sugar, about 4 to 5 ounces of heavy whipping cream and 2 teaspoons of pure Vanilla, I found the PERFECT BLEND. Great spreading consistency and just sweet enough. The Crisco seems to cut the sweetness, while giving the frosting a bit more stability, which is great if you're going to use it for piping borders around a cake or making rosettes and leaves on top. Be sure to beat the frosting with an electric mixer on high speed, a minimum of 10 minutes, or until nice and fluffy. Had enough to GENEROUSLY frost 24 cupcakes, with about 2 cups left over. Can‘t believe using Crisco would make all the difference. Thanks Rick! *UPDATE 1: The whipping cream is a MUST! I forgot to buy whipping cream and used milk instead, big mistake... the frosting wasn't as fluffy and creamy. *UPDATE 2: I wanted a peanut butter frosting for a Reese's chocolate cake I was making, so I added in 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter with the Crisco and butter. Turned out great, with just enough of a peanut butter taste to do the trick.
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882 users found this review helpful
Photo by JOSLYN H.

American Potato Salad

Reviewed: May 14, 2003
Greetings all! :-) Thank you for trying my recipe, and for your reviews. This is a good, basic recipe and best when made a day ahead to allow the flavors to blend. What fun to read what others have added, mustard, pickles, bacon, radishes, etc. Because everyone’s tastes vary, as mentioned in the description, I encourage you to add "additional ingredients" to make this recipe "your own". Don’t be afraid to experiment, that's what makes cooking fun. When adding bacon or chopped dill pickles, you may want to reduce the salt called for in the recipe. Have Fun and Happy Cooking! Joslyn
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272 users found this review helpful
Photo by JOSLYN H.

Oven Baked Jambalaya

Reviewed: Sep. 21, 2005
Greetings all! :-) Thank you for trying my recipe, and for your reviews. Some have commented on the rice being under cooked, or mushy, and I'd like to address that issue. When I say stir half way through, please be sure to stir completely, from the bottom up and all around the sides. Oven temperatures very dramatically and not everyone has the same type of cookware. For my old oven, and the very large enameled roaster pan I use, the rice did cook correctly. I recently purchased a new gas stove and nothing cooks the same (wish I had my old stove back...LOL). It now takes 1 3/4 to 2 hours in my new oven. With this in mind, I suggest checking the rice more often during the baking time, or adjusting the cooking time and/or temperature to suit your oven and cookware. If you cut the recipe amounts by half, please remember to adjust the cooking time too. While cooking, the rice will absorb some of the spices; therefore the finished dish will not taste as spicy as it does before cooking. The amount of spices listed is for those with average tolerance for spice. Feel free to use more, or less, to suit your taste. Traditionally Jambalaya has more of a porridge consistency; therefore the rice will absorb most of the juices. If you prefer fluffy rice, surely you can cook the rice separately. If you like a soupy consistency, you can use less rice. This recipe can also be prepared in a large stockpot, on the stove top, if you prefer. I find it scorches easier though, so watch it closely.
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253 users found this review helpful

Chicken Puffs

Reviewed: Nov. 1, 2010
They now sell solid sheets of crescent dough, so you don’t have to press the individual rolls together. Cut each sheet into 4 pieces, makes it a lot easier to use. Also, line your pans with parchment paper for easier cleanup, should you have any leaks. I make these with the chicken, onion and garlic, and then add frozen chopped spinach (defrosted and squeezed dry), mixed with parmesan cheese and enough mayonnaise to moisten. I don’t use cream cheese or butter. I often use a Calzone filling, of onion, bell pepper and crumbled Italian sausage (cooked & well drained) mixed with pizza sauce and shredded mozzarella cheese. Cubed ham, broccoli and Swiss cheese is also good. You can substitute just about any combination of cooked meat, vegetables and cheese, mixed with enough mayonnaise, sour cream, or any type of sauce to moisten; even creamed soup (undiluted)) will work. Served with a salad, makes a nice dinner or cut into quarters for an appetizer. And don’t forget dessert, use fresh fruit, sliced and mixed with sweetened cream cheese. Drizzle baked and cooled puffs with a simple powdered sugar glaze. The possibilities are endless!
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178 users found this review helpful

Puff Pastry

Reviewed: Feb. 1, 2008
THANK YOU... THANK YOU... THANK YOU!!! I had been making this pastry dough for years, until I lost the recipe. I called it "1 2 3 Puffed Pastry" because I always doubled the recipe for my LARGE extended family, for the holidays. I remembered the amounts "1 2 3" but my mind kept telling me I used cream cheese. When I found this recipe the light went on...LOL I used SOUR CREAM... not cream cheese...DUH! Roll the dough out thin (1/8" to 1/4") cut out 2-1/2" rounds of dough. Place a scant teaspoonful of Solo brand fruit, nut, or poppy seed filling down the center. Fold the sides up and over the filling, overlapping the dough and pinching together to keep the dough from unfolding during baking. Bake on parchment lined cookie sheets, in a 375 degree oven, 12 to 15 mins or until light golden brown. When baked, cool completely on wire rack and dust with powdered sugar. Since there is no sugar in the dough you can even use savory fillings of cheeses, vegetables or meats, for great appetizers. I can't THANK YOU enough, Patti. My family will be delighted, that I can make one of their favorites once again.
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100 users found this review helpful

Red Skinned Potato Salad

Reviewed: Jul. 1, 2011
Is the amount of potatoes correct; or is there a typo? 2 cups of Mayo, 6 eggs and a pound of bacon for only 2 lbs of potatoes? That seems excessive to me. To start I'll try 1 cup of Mayo... (Hellman's of course), 3 eggs and 1/2 a pound of crispy bacon, I can always add more if I think it's needed; or I could probably use 4 to 5 lbs of potatoes. I'll post an update after I make this recipe. UPDATE: I made this recipe today, July 3rd. As written I found 2 lbs of potatoes just wasn't the proper ratio to the amounts of mayonnaise, eggs and bacon. I wound up using about 5 lbs of potatoes. I also added more celery, 3 ribs, 2 green onions thinly sliced, and a small green pepper, seeded and dice fine. With these additions, the 2 cups of mayonnaise and 6 eggs were the perfect amounts; although next time I would only use 1/2 lb of bacon, 1 lb was still a bit too much. I'm sure this will taste even better tomorrow, for our July 4th cook-out.
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92 users found this review helpful

Sugar Coated Pecans

Reviewed: Jun. 5, 2010
I have been making these pecans for at least 30 years but use 1 teaspoon of cinnamon. Some reviewers add vanilla; I find that masks the taste of the pecans too much. If you’re having a sticking problem, put 1 Tablespoon butter on a large baking sheet with sides. Place pan in the preheated oven to melt butter. Remove from oven and spread butter over entire bottom of pan. No need to drag out the Kitchen-Aid or use plastic bags, just wisk 1 large egg white and 1 Tablespoon of water until frothy, this is enough liquid to coat 1 pounds of nuts. Add the pecans to the egg white mixture and, using a rubber spatula, keep folding and stirring the pecans until completely coated. Add nuts to bowl with sugar mixture and again, using a rubber spatula, keep folding and stirring the pecans until completely coated. When the pecans are properly coated, there will be no sugar mixture left in the bowl. Be sure to spread pecans on the buttered baking sheet, in a single layer, and don’t forget to stir every 15 minutes while baking. I bake mine at 300 degrees F for 1 hour and have never had a problem with the nuts burning. Let cool completely before storing in an airtight container and store at room temperature. Will last several weeks, if they aren’t eaten before that!
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Stuffing of Champions

Reviewed: Nov. 23, 2011
This is very similar to my stuffing, I’ve been making for 50 years, but I use a bit more butter (1 stick), dry sage and poultry seasoning. I bake it covered, outside the turkey and since there are no juices from the turkey I add turkey broth to moisten the bread (College Inn brand is available Thanksgiving thru Christmas), chicken broth will also work; bouillon is all salt. I also mix in some grated carrot, adds a little color. I cook the vegetables and seasonings in the butter until almost tender, then gently fold into the bread cubes, alternating with broth and bake at 350 degrees until heated thru, about 40 to 45 minutes... YUM!
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82 users found this review helpful

Andrea's Pasta Fagioli

Reviewed: Jan. 8, 2010
Since I’m always willing to try new recipes I tried this one, before reviewing it. While different from mine, this is a good recipe. I’m 67 years old and yes, Italian also (which doesn’t make me an authority)! I have been making my variation of Pasta Fagioli for a long time and I always use celery. For a reviewer to make such a broad statement that celery or carrots are NEVER in Pasta Fagioli, is just wrong. If you like celery or carrots in your Pasta Fagioli, by all means USE THEM! This is a peasant or farmers type meal and they had to use what they had on hand. Yes this is basically a bean and pasta soup without meat, although there are authentic recipes that use Pancetta (Italian bacon), obviously from peasants with more Lira than the average peasant… lol… so if you want meat USE IT! After all, you’re cooking to please yourself and your family. If you check Lidia Matticchio Bastianich’s recipe, (from Lydia’s Italy on PBS) her recipe has potatoes, carrots and ham hocks in it. So you see, as with any recipe, there are probably as many variations as there are cooks, and all recipes are authentic to each individual cook. Experiment and cook to satisfy yourself, that’s what makes cooking fun and exciting! Mangia!
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60 users found this review helpful

Cocktail Meatballs

Reviewed: Feb. 5, 2010
I'm 67 and this recipe has been around forever... they're always a hit, where ever I take them. Definitely bake the meatballs before adding them to the sauce. I bake mine 25 to 30 minutes. The correct chili sauce is a tomato based chili sauce, such as Heinz or Cross & Blackwell. Sometimes I use grape jelly in place of the cranberry sauce (same amount), also makes a very good sauce. If you are making this for a group, trust me you'll want to double, or even triple the recipe. People don't stop at 4 or 5, they just keep eating them until they're gone... especially the guys... LOL These are addictive!!!!!
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39 users found this review helpful

Croque-Monsieur

Reviewed: Apr. 4, 2009
I tried this sandwich, as written, and it was good but a bit too rich for me. Another reviewer called this sandwich a fake, which is wrong. This sandwich can be baked and broiled or fried in a pan, with or without Mornay or Bechamel sauce. Gruyère is traditionally used and is a Swiss cheese, although camembert or brie can be used. The version served with the egg on top is called a "Croque Madame". Made with tomatoes it's a "Croque Provencal," made with Bleu cheese a "Croque Auvergant." So you see, as with any recipe, there are probably as many variations as their are cooks.
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38 users found this review helpful

American Chop Suey II

Reviewed: Sep. 22, 2012
I think the younger generation... just doesn't "GET IT!" This is a mid-century recipe from a simpler time, that sooooo many seniors grew up eating (and loved as kids, I might add). It is what it is! You want to add greem pepper, mushrooms, a sprinkle of cheese; I can understand that. BUT... when people completely change the recipe by using marinara sauce, tomato sauce, stewed tomatoes, diced tomatoes, Italian or Mexican spices; it's just NOT the same recipe! And aren't we all getting a bit tired of the BUZZ word "BLAND", it's so freely used to describe so many recipes on this site. PLEASE... like it or not; rate the recipe as written.
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37 users found this review helpful

Chicken and Broccoli Braid

Reviewed: Sep. 2, 2010
They now sell solid sheets of crescent dough, so you don’t have to press the individual rolls together, makes it a lot easier to use. This is a Pampered Chef recipe and calls for 1 teaspoon of dill weed, not 2. Personally I don't use dill, don't care for the flavor. I also use parmesan cheese, not cheddar. I often use a Calzone filling, of onion, bell pepper and crumbled Italian sausage (cooked & well drained) mixed with pizza sauce and topped with shredded mozzarella cheese. Cubed ham, broccoli and Swiss cheese is also good. You can substitute just about any combination of cooked meat, vegetables and cheese, mixed with about a 1/2 cup mayonnaise, sour cream, or any type of sauce to moisten; even 1/2 cup of creamed soup (undiluted)) will work. Serve with a salad, makes a nice dinner, or cut into bite sized pieces as an appetizer. And don’t forget dessert, spread dough with sweetened cream cheese, top with a fruit filling, and drizzle baked and cooled braid with a simple powdered sugar glaze.
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33 users found this review helpful

Delicious Egg Salad for Sandwiches

Reviewed: Apr. 1, 2010
What can you say about a basic Egg Salad recipe... you like it or you don't! This is the way I have made mine, forever, except I add very finely sliced celery because I like a little crunch. I read all the reviews and some say it's bland but that's a matter of taste. Not everyone likes highly seasoned food and for those who do, you can easily spice it up to suit your taste. Personal preference, as far as seasonings go, should never be a reason to down rate a recipe.
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25 users found this review helpful

One - Two - Three - Mexican Macaroni Salad

Reviewed: Jun. 23, 2007
Greetings all! :-) Thank you for trying my recipe and for your reviews. I love to read how others have taken one of my recipe and added to it, to make the recipe their own. The addition of corn, black beans, green onion, etc... all great ideas. Most recipes are adaptable to variation so never be afraid to experiment, that's what makes cooking fun. And when someone says "I love this, can I have "YOUR" recipe?"... now that's a great feeling.
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22 users found this review helpful

Danish Almond Puff

Reviewed: Dec. 9, 2004
Thank you, thank you, thank you, I had this recipe years ago. This is from an old cook book, which I lost while moving. I would often put a thin layer of Solo fruit filling, or almond paste, over the crust, between the two layers. Easy and elegant dessert, great for company.
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21 users found this review helpful

Anzac Biscuits I

Reviewed: May 19, 2012
My 9 year old Grandson and I made these biscuits (cookies) for a class presentation on Australia. We use unsweetened coconut and added a 1/4 teaspoon salt. If your dough is crumbly, just add more water, 1 teaspoon at a time, until the dough holds together. We used a small cookie scoop (about 1-1/2” across) and flattened the biscuits a bit. After baking they came out about 3 inches across. Our biscuits were smaller, so we baked them 10 minutes @ 350F. They came out crispy but a bit tough and chewy in the middle. After they cooled for half an hour, they crisped up more. We also found them a bit greasy; next time we’ll try 1/3 cup butter and add 1/4 cup more flour, for a softer cookie (personal preference). UPDATE: I used 1 cup coconut, 1-1/4 cup flour, 1/4 tsp. salt, and 1/3 cup butter, on my second attempt; and baked them @300F, 13 minutes. They were softer, as I had hoped. Either way the flavor of these biscuit is great A Google search found the original recipe on the Australian Government Department of Veterans’ Affairs website. Sharon’s recipe is spot on, except the original recipe calls for 1 cup coconut. NOTE: The Australian Tablespoon is actually about 1 teaspoon larger than the US Tablespoon; 1 (US) Tablespoon PLUS 1 (US) teaspoon is equal to 1 (Australian) Tablespoon. Adjust teaspoon measurements, using just slightly rounded teaspoons (or fractions of teaspoon) in Australian recipes; unless it is noted that measurements have been converted to US measurements.
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The Best Meatballs

Reviewed: Oct. 25, 2011
This recipe is from Rao's Restaurant in Harlem NY. Only difference is less water and more garlic; Google it for yourself. How can you take credit for someone else’s recipe?
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17 users found this review helpful

Easy Vegetarian Spinach Lasagna

Reviewed: Sep. 9, 2013
Read reviews and doubled the ricotta, sauce, egg and mozzarella. Used no-bake noodles and 2 (10oz) boxes of frozen chopped spinach; which I zapped in the micro 4 to 5 minutes (to save time and use less utensils) and also squeezed out all the liquid from the spinach. Baked in a 9x13 pan, covered, 30 minutes; uncovered and baked and additional 10 minutes. Let sit 10 to 15 minutes before serving. TURNED OUT GREAT.
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16 users found this review helpful

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