Little Old Lady Recipe Reviews (Pg. 1) - Allrecipes.com (16701599)

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Wine Cookies (Original Italian)

Reviewed: Nov. 12, 2012
Very yummy, but one important step was left out of the directions. The oil must be added to the dry ingredients BEFORE the wine and worked into them well, first. This coats the flour and keeps it from soaking up as much wine and becoming gluey. Doing this, along with letting the dough cool awhile in the refrigerator before forming the cookies, means no sticky dough. In fact the dough turns out elastic and just like playdough--very easy to handle. To get the 2" diameter cookies, pull off just enough to make balls a little under an inch in diameter. They will be the right size when you flatten them. Be generous with the sugar coating. These go great with a cup of black tea.
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25 users found this review helpful

Toaster Oven Oatmeal Cookies

Reviewed: Nov. 12, 2012
Now people who have tiny kitchenettes can bake cookies, too. These come out exactly as promised.
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1 user found this review helpful

Oatmeal Crispies I

Reviewed: Nov. 9, 2012
These were quite tasty & CRISPY. (I did flatten them to 1/4" thick using a greased spatula & baked them 12 minutes.) OK, all of you who said they came out chewy, admit you used all margarine or butter instead of shortening. The reason it makes such a big difference is that margarine & butter have some water in them, and shortening doesn't. The exception is special European-style butter which has much of the water squeezed out so it cooks more predictably. You can find it at upscale supermarkets and gourmet stores. The only change I made was to add 2/3 cup of raisins. Unlike most cookie recipes, these did not come out too sweet for me using the full amount of sugar.
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9 users found this review helpful

Hunter Style Chicken

Reviewed: Oct. 4, 2012
With just a few tweaks, this is 5 stars. I doubled the fresh herbs and held off putting in the basil until the last 10 minutes of cooking. Before I browned the chicken I dredged it in flour seasoned w/ s&p, and a trace of chipotle powder for a touch of smoke, as I don't eat red meat (the bacon). Since I used the flour and no bacon, I added a bit more oil before sauteeing the veggies. I included a couple of coarsely diced carrots and 2 minced cloves of garlic w/ the onions & mushrooms, as I'd seen in other, similar recipes. Two full-sized tomatoes make a lb. if, like most Americans, you don't have a food scale. For the cooking wine, I chose a decent Garnacha--an inexpensive, low tannin, Spanish red, but if you can get Dolcetto on sale that would be great. Don't forget to offer lots of crusty Italian bread to sop up the sauce.
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8 users found this review helpful

Mother's Applesauce Cake

Reviewed: Sep. 23, 2012
A LOT of the flavor of this cake depends upon the applesauce used. This is an older recipe, created when applesauce wasn't diluted and had good flavor, sweetness, and some tang to it from the natural acid of the apples. There's a lot of watery applesauce out there these days, so taste yours first. If you can't get good stuff, quarter, core and microwave some apples in a covered dish until soft (the skins slip right off when it's done), and use that. I used a nice, flavorful, organic brand, but when I checked, it seemed low on acid, so, to make the cake rise well, I added a T. of cider vinegar to it. The cake rose a bit TOO well, almost overflowing the pan, so next time I will cut back to 2 tsps. ALSO, dates are very sweet, so if you are omitting them, be a bit generous w/ the sugar. Frankly, it's unfair to the recipe to omit all the add-ins, use watery applesauce, and then complain that the cake is bland. I did skip the dates and raisins, but kept the nuts, used only the amount of cinnamon and cloves called for, but compensated for the omissions by increasing the brown sugar and adding the same amount of powdered ginger as cinnamon. The cake turned out delicious w/ definite applesauce flavor, and I appreciated the restrained use of shortening. A keeper that I plan to make again often.
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17 users found this review helpful

WWII Oatmeal Molasses Cookies

Reviewed: Sep. 18, 2012
I agree w/ some other reviewers that these are like "muffinettes" since they are raised more like muffins than cookies. They only add-in I used was a walnut half pushed into the bottom of each cookie. I also added 1 tsp. of pumpkin pie spice to the dry ingredients for a very lightly spiced taste. The simple muffin-y part had a lovely, retro, homey taste and texture, and they are very quick and easy to make. I ate way too many of them while they were warm.
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5 users found this review helpful

Mock Tuna Salad

Reviewed: May 25, 2012
It needed nori or Atlantic laver flakes (types of seaweed) to taste convincing. Sometimes I use a little lemon juice instead of the mustard. It's good either way. I wonder if it would work using drained and crumbled tofu instead of chickpeas?
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4 users found this review helpful

Louisiana Sweet Potato Pancakes

Reviewed: Apr. 24, 2012
I THINK THE RECIPE SUBMITTER INTENDED FOR PEOPLE TO USE 3/4 LB. OF SWEET POTATO WEIGHED AFTER COOKING THEM, but she didn't write that, and I went by the recipe as written. I couldn't get these to cook through. The only thing I changed was to add a bit more spice. I cooked them for twice as long as I usually cook pancakes, and on a hotter griddle, but they came out gooey and inedible. Next time, I'll add a T. of sugar to the wet ingredients. And I'll separate the eggs and beat the whites until they make peaks. I'll use less milk to make them less wet.
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12 users found this review helpful

Streusel Coffee Cake

Reviewed: Jan. 7, 2012
This is a classic coffee cake, similar to what my late mother used to keep on hand for guests, but the recipe needed some help. First, I baked this in a flat-bottomed angel food type tube cake pan (the closest modern equivalent to my mother's tube pan w/ straight, 3-1/2" sides that was designed for streusel cakes). I covered the top w/ foil for part of the bake time to prevent the streusel from burning. This way the cake is turned out upside down, but is then inverted again so that the streusel is back on top. Fluted cake tops can't show the streusel, and the batter is less likely to run over in a taller pan. I made the cake as written except for using lowfat sour cream but w/o salt (almost 1 tsp) there is the "flat" taste some reviewers mentioned. When a baking recipe calls for butter but doesn't specify what type, the convention is that it means unsalted butter. Perhaps the submitter uses salted butter or margarine, so she didn't include the necessary salt in the recipe. If you use supermarket vanilla extract (and not extra-strength gourmet extract) the amount of vanilla should be doubled. Streusel sticks better if it includes a bit of butter. My batter came out too thick to spread well in the pan, and the cake was more oily-textured than I like. One solution to both issues is to sub in applesauce for half the recipe's butter. However, the recipe was a great starting point to recreate my mother's classic.
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8 users found this review helpful

Passover Lemon Bars

Reviewed: Dec. 25, 2011
Excellent concept for a Passover cookie, but needs considerable tweaking. Many almond macaroon recipes say to bake on greased parchment--solves the sticking problem. I like grinding 1 c. blanched almonds (not sure what the weight is) w/ 1/2 c. sugar in food processor and mixing w/ 1 egg white. Another option that doesn't need parchment is to make a crust by mixing 1c. finely ground almonds, 1/4 c. light brown sugar, & 1/3 c. melted margarine, and press into baking dish. Both types are baked for 10 min. at 350 deg.. Different lemon bar recipes vary widely in the proportions of the ingredients, but, on average, for 6 eggs they call for the juice & grated zest of 6 lemons, 2 c. of sugar, and 1/3 c. flour (translating into 1/4 or 1/3 c. potato starch). Potato starch is just a slightly stronger thickener than ap flour. The filling is baked at around 325 deg. for approx. 35 min.. Despite the flaws, I appreciate the suggestion to make lemon bars for Passover. I love them, and would never have thought to make them for the holiday myself.
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11 users found this review helpful

Vegan Baked Beans

Reviewed: Dec. 1, 2011
I soaked the beans for a few hours in the fridge first, used 1/4 t. powdered ginger & 1/8 t. allspice instead of the cinnamon & nutmeg, and subbed canola oil for the recipe's olive oil. I don't like garlic in my BB, so I skipped that. Reduced the tomato sauce/puree (NOT pasta sauce) to about 23 oz. W/ all the sugar, regular onions were fine--didn't need sweet ones. W/ the changes, simple and tasty.
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10 users found this review helpful

Lentils and Rice with Fried Onions (Mujadarrah)

Reviewed: Nov. 12, 2011
This recipe needed a lot of help. Firstly I had to figure out how much water to use TWICE, as "an inch above the lentils" (or rice) changes depending on the size of the pot. The lentils needed longer cooking before adding the rice in order to be tender w/o making the rice mushy. It needed more seasoning than s & p. I used cumin at the beginning and added thyme toward the end of cooking. It would have been improved w/ a little garlic, too. It made more sense to prepare the onions while the lentils were cooking rather than waste time doing it beforehand, and I agree w/ the reviewers who suggested caramelizing the onions more slowly over lower heat--they cook more evenly that way--and using double the amount. I prefer eating this w/ a lemony harissa instead of yogurt. Because I misestimated the amount of water, I ended up w/ some stuck on lentils and rice at the bottom of the pot, but I did manage to season it up so it had enough flavor. Will look for a different recipe for this dish next time I want it.
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5 users found this review helpful

MMMMM... Brownies

Reviewed: Oct. 12, 2011
This recipe made pretty decent fudge. Though I love chocolate, these were too chocolaty even for me, and went way overboard in fudge texture. I can't imagine eating more than a 1-inch square at a time. Maybe part of the problem was that I used high quality Ghirardelli semi-sweet chocolate chips, but I did follow the recipe. If you enjoy eating mass quantities of chocolate fudge while calling it "brownies", these are for you.
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3 users found this review helpful

Oatmeal Crispies

Reviewed: Aug. 30, 2011
These were quite tasty & CRISPY. (I did flatten them to 1/4" thick using a greased spatula & baked them 12 minutes.) OK, all of you who said they came out chewy, admit you used margarine or butter instead of shortening. The reason it makes such a big difference is that margarine & butter have some water in them, and shortening doesn't. The exception is special European-style butter which has the water squeezed out so it cooks more predictably. You can find it at upscale supermarkets and gourmet stores. The only change I made was to add 2/3 cup of raisins. Unlike most cookie recipes, these did not come out too sweet for me using the full amount of sugar.
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9 users found this review helpful

Hermit Bar Cookies

Reviewed: Jul. 6, 2011
These cookies are delicious! Five tips I learned after baking them a few times: 1) Hermits are an antique cookie dating back to colonial times. White flour was not available until the late 1800s, so these taste wonderful w/ the original whole wheat as long as you get fresh flour. Whole wheat flour should not be bitter. If it is, it is rancid and should be replaced w/ a different brand. 2) The problem w/ the sticky texture is caused by the egg, probably a recent addition to the recipe. I made it w/o the egg & the dough was easier to handle, & results superb. 3) Don't mix the soda w/ the coffe. Put it w/ the dry ingredients so it retains its leavening power. 4) A tasty variation is to sub frozen oj concentrate & grated orange zest for the coffee. This version needs less sugar. 5) It can be made as a single 1/3" layer instead of strips, cooked a few minutes more, & sliced while warm, if you'd rather not fiddle w/ the dough. Also I agree w/ reviewers who recommend increasing the spices. These end up the tastiest "healthy" cookie I've ever had.
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78 users found this review helpful

Super Simple Biscuits

Reviewed: Jun. 24, 2011
The recipe given is a dough, not a batter. If you want a thick batter, use buttermilk instead of sour cream. It also has more butter than usual. To make a thick batter as described, I used: A scant cup of whole wheat pastry flour (I always use whole wheat), 1/2 tsp each baking powder and baking soda. Then I softened 3 Tbsp. margarine and mixed it w/ 1/2 c. lite sour cream and 3 Tbsp. water to get the right consistency & baked in a muffin tin as recommended, but at 400 deg in the toaster oven for 14 min. covered loosely w/ foil, and an additional 5 min. uncovered. The batter created so much steam that they didn't have enough substance for biscuits. There is such a thing as TOO light. They did have good flavor. Next time I will make it w/o water, as a soft dough. I will use my own labor-saving method and make scones (faster than biscuits) by hand-forming the dough into a log about 3" diameter, then patting it down into a 3/4" thick rectangle on a small, non-stick toaster oven tray. I then score it w/ a sharp knife into triangles--this size recipe makes about 5 good sized scones. It is much easier than rolling & cutting biscuits. I'll bake as I described above. What this recipe has taught me is that by softening the margarine, I can skip the usual scone step of cutting the shortening into the dry ingredients, and that lite sour cream is a slight improvement over my usual buttermilk. I appreciate learning to make already easy scones even easier.
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4 users found this review helpful

Boston Brown Bread I

Reviewed: May 24, 2011
This bread was just what I needed to go w/ homemade split pea soup w/ lots of carrots (for sweetness). I made a half recipe b/c that was all I needed. Unfortunately I made it w/o reading the reviews first and found out the hard way that the baking temp. needed to be lower (350 deg.). The outside of my bread, both top & bottom, was almost burnt while the inside was still too wet. I made it a 2nd time w/ half the molasses called for, a little additional buttermilk to make up for the missing portion of molasses, and cooked it longer at 350 deg.. It was still quite moist like it should be, not as dry as cake, but it did not taste anymore like uncooked dough inside. Like most no fat baked goods, the texture was a bit rubbery, but the raisins helped break it up. I think it's important to use lighter molasses--definitely not blackstrap or the taste will be too strong. I'll bet English golden syrup would work well too. The corrected recipe is now my go-to boston brown bread--better than store bought, and perfect w/ baked beans.
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12 users found this review helpful

Shirred Eggs

Reviewed: Apr. 22, 2011
Yummy, but this is what an egg coddler is for. So much easier and more energy efficient to put these ingredients into an egg coddler w/ a screw-on top, and boil to desired doneness in a pot of lightly salted water. Why did they stop making coddlers anyway??
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24 users found this review helpful

Divine Hard-Boiled Eggs

Reviewed: Apr. 22, 2011
This recipe works better if you put 1/2 t. salt in the water as you fill the pot. That delays boiling until the temp is just a bit higher, and will take care of the issue experienced by many reviewers of eggs not quite done. Some of the inconsistency in the results probably came about because the recipe does not say what size pot to use. A larger pot (more water), would hold the heat longer than a smaller one just big enough to hold the eggs. These two omissions (salt & amount of water) is why this is not a 5-star recipe, even though it may work perfectly for some of the users. Of course if you live at high altitude, you may want to simmer the eggs on low 1 or 2 minutes after they first boil and before you take them off the heat. Once you find eggzactly the right timing for where you live, you will have a foolproof formula.
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26 users found this review helpful

Banana Frittata

Reviewed: Apr. 20, 2011
This was clearly an effort to make something similar to banana fritters without the deep frying, and w/ less frying altogether, and it ALMOST worked. The taste is pleasant if you add 1/4 t. ground cardamom. However bananas w/ their natural sugars & starch are just about the stickiest thing you can put in a pan, and flipping this gooey "frittata" is quite challenging. If you divide it into something more like pancakes, keeping the diameter no bigger than the length of your turner, change the milk to either buttermilk or plain yogurt, and add 1/2 t. baking soda, it just about works, but the bananas still tend to stick to the pan. Especially if you're like me and avoid non-stick cookware and use a well-seasoned griddle instead. I also think that the recipe would work better if the 2T. of oil were incorporated into the batter, and only some butter were used on the gridde. Even so, when you pour the batter onto a hot skillet to make a solid crust and then turn the temp down to cook it through, as you should, these things are still somewhat messy. I'd rather make a hi-protein version of banana bread (extra egg, some wheat germ). Kids like that too.
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8 users found this review helpful

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