JohnPlaysWithHisFood Recipe Reviews (Pg. 1) - Allrecipes.com (15028239)

cook's profile

JohnPlaysWithHisFood

Reviews

Photos

 
View All Reviews Learn more

Grilled Chicken with Peach Sauce

Reviewed: Jul. 23, 2014
This is a cool little recipe during peach season, but a couple of points. 1st-it's from Bobby Flay('Hot off the Grill' with Bobby Flay) so let's give credit where credit is due, 2nd-for those who didn't get enough flavor, it's a glaze for grilling, not a marinate, 3rd-the original calls for half the number of breasts, but they're bone-in 'Frenched' breasts, plus a small finely chopped chili pepper. To glaze the chicken, build a two stage fire (all the embers piled to one side), 'mark up' the chicken over the high heat, then move off the direct heat and turn and baste every few minutes. Keep the lid on between bastings. This gives a lovely, glossy and tasty coating to the meat. It will work well with any stone fruit that's in season, but the peaches are killer this year. I think that ripe pears or pineapple would probably work as well.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
57 users found this review helpful

Sweet Chili Thai Sauce

Reviewed: Jun. 8, 2014
We discovered sweet chili dipping sauce at our local Thai resturant while enjoying their spring rolls. My wife, who is new to Asian food, fell in love! I found some at the grocery, but at $3 for 6.75 oz and her growing enthusiasm and appetite for the stuff I needed a plan. Enter AllRecipes! The store bought stuff from K-A-M-E was about right and so the search was on. After reading all the reviews, I approached the problem differently. This recipe is basically a simple syrup (one to one ratio of water and sugar) with flavoring additions. I left out the vinegar and added the ingredients as listed except I used Huy Fong (Rooster brand) Chili-garlic sauce and skipped the ketchup. I didn't want that much color. Before I added the corn starch (2 tsp to 4 tsp of cold water) I tasted and it was cloying so I added a TBSP of Rice vinegar and it was perfect! Little spicier, but I could cut back on the Chili Garlic sauce. We like it the way it is. I could also add a little more vinegar but it works for 'The Honey" in my life. As Chef John of Food Wishes says, "You're in charge of your gravy". The same thing applies to your dipping sauce, marinades, etc. Start with the core recipe or 'base' (usually the larger quantity ingredients) and start playing with the flavor profile-more or less vinegar, more or less heat, garlic, ginger, etc. After leaving out most of the the vinegar I got 16 ozs of killer sauce @ a cost of 75 cents. She wants a gallon. $6 bucks and I'm a hero!
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
0 users found this review helpful

Easy Gravy

Reviewed: Jun. 5, 2014
I added Salt and pepper to taste. This will get some nice sauce on your food. Don't forget to season!
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
0 users found this review helpful

Joe's Special Beef and Spinach Scramble

Reviewed: May 29, 2014
This was what I was looking for...ah, memories of San Fransisco nights, out on the town! The flavors were spot on, but I tried the adjustments Chef John suggested and it was still HUGE. Next time I'll try the recipe as it stands sans eggs, then take about a cup of the meat, mushroom and Spinach mix and scramble in two-three eggs per person. I'll bet that's what they do in the Diners. In fact, if I hadn't added the eggs the meat mix would probably hold well enough in the frig for a day or two for left overs. As always, Chef John encourages us to play with our food. Anyone for Joe's REALLY Special Beef and Spinach Scramble Wraps for lunch? Want a little Huy Fong Siracha on that?
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
0 users found this review helpful

Capers and Halibut

Reviewed: May 15, 2014
In the process of organizing my recipe box I realized I had failed to rate this amazing and simple dish. First, Halibut is a fabulous, delicious fish. You have to work hard to ruin it! This recipe takes it to new heights. The only mistake I made was making it for my wife, who was raised to think that 'fried' fish was deep fried Catfish in a batter, preferably corn meal. Double coated! Geeeez! Limited life experience. So why was this a mistake? Well, fresh farmed Catfish is $5 a pound all day long and Halibut, when I can get it, is $20...and she wants it all the time! You can see the problem.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
1 user found this review helpful

Chef John's Party Cheese Puffs

Reviewed: May 15, 2014
These are wonderfully delicious and ridiculously easy to make! Watch the video...it's a piece of cake. (Well piece of cheesy dough). I am the cook in our house and my wife needed appetizers for an open house for wealthy clients, so asked if I would make these. I never had before so I groaned loudly and stomped off to the kitchen while she made a baked spinach Artichoke dip for the filling. Made a couple dozen for her, she took the puffs and the dip and put it together at work the next day. BIG HIT! MAJOR BROWNY POINTS! One gal brought some KFC chicken, another grocery store cookies, the boss bought mediocre wine and sad little sandwiches from a 'caterer'. My wife's trays were wiped out in minutes! A few days later I made some more so we could use up the extra dip and she took some for lunch at work. Folks asked "left over gougeres?" She said, "No, he just made some more". "Your husband makes Gougeres for your lunch?" "Sure, why not?" MORE browny points! Look, I'm an ex-yankee and adopted redneck back in the hills of the Southern Appalachians. If I can make them and have them turn out well, anybody can. Watch the video and try your hand. You'll be amazed! Watch all of Chef John's videos and you'll be a hero too!
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
2 users found this review helpful

Grilled Chicken Salad Sandwich

Reviewed: May 12, 2014
It was OK, but more than a little boring.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
0 users found this review helpful

Steak Salad

Reviewed: May 5, 2014
Great Stuff! Ditched the green olives.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
0 users found this review helpful

Chef John's Barbecue Chicken

Reviewed: Mar. 29, 2014
What's not to love? Some fresh chicken, a grill and a few simple ingredients...my favorite type of recipe! For those who don't grill often or weren't taught by an experienced 'griller' here's an old fashioned (a couple of hundred thousand years?) and effective way to judge the fire's heat without a $100 'instant read' thermometer. Carefully place the palm of your hand at the level your food will be and count until your hand gets so hot you have to move it away. The following guidelines will let you determine the heat level of you grill before you grill that BBQ chicken. •Very Hot-1 second...over 500F,•Hot-2 to 3 seconds...about 375F to 425F (approx), •MediumHot-3 to 4 seconds...about 350F to 375F (approx),•Medium-4 to 5 seconds...about 325F to 350F(approx)•Medium-Low-5 to 6 seconds, •Low-6 to 7 seconds There, I just saved you a Franklin! Once you get accustomed to this method you'll be able to judge the temp. by the appearance of the coals and ash. The recipe indicates that you use a closed or domed grill so essentially your baking with a smoky fire. Obviously, using the about chart, you can bake any recipe in the oven that you can do on the grill. Remember, charcoal varies (chuck, briquets, brand) and ovens vary widely, even ambient air temp. and wind!...keep an eye on it!
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
9 users found this review helpful

Creamy Herbed Pork Chops

Reviewed: Mar. 22, 2014
This basic recipe is my Mom's pan gravy from when I was a kid, only it was sixty+ years ago and I could never put it together-till Cassie came along! I recognized it immediately. I love when I find a 'core' recipe on this site that I can improvise with. Cassie, I am deeply in your debt. And the addition of the 'modern' seasoning and grilling mixes and the herbs-well that's just a genius cook playing with her food! God, you could use practically any blend on your meat for pan frying or dry roasting with plenty extra for the potatoes. We are fans of Weber's grilling mixes....my wife is nuts for "kickin Chicken", I like'm all, but am really up for the Mesquite one. Might need to change from Basil to another herb on occasion, but golly this is soooo cool! Rosemary would be nifty. OK guys, here's the plan. Everybody rate Cassie's recipe with five stars and sent in all your wild ideas on ways you changed it. Drive the 'recipe changer' haters crazy! I'm going to play with my food now.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
6 users found this review helpful

Asian Grilled Chicken

Reviewed: Mar. 22, 2014
I have done this recipe several times and it is amazingly good. This time it was even better. First, the Siracha chili-garlic paste really makes a difference. You could sub red chili flakes if you have no choice. Didn't have Thai sweet chili sauce, just used regular chile sauce. Everything else the same. I finally got my Weber Grill, cooked for the first 25 minutes on a 2 level fire (fire on one side, meat on the other) so it baked for a while. Basted and turned several times to glaze then placed the thighs on the hot side to 'mark it up' with char at about 25 minutes. Also used a chunk of hickory wood on the fire. Use the lid, set the vents correctly, it doesn't flame, but gives a smokey flavor to the grilled meat. Oh my god! I have been on the planet 69 years and this is the best Asian style BBQ I have ever eaten, much less made myself. I 'sterilized' the marinade for about 15 min while the meat was cooking. When I removed the thighs from the grill I tented them with Aluminum foil and added corn starch to the marinate in the pan. (1 TBSP corn starch, 2 TBSP water. Drizzle slowing while stirring.) Thickened perfectly and used as a sauce over the thighs and some extra on the rice on the side. UPDATE:I noticed another reviewer who couldn't find Thai Sweet Chili Sauce...there's a recipe right here on AR and it's a dead ringer for the one we get at the Thai restaurant! Gonna try this on boneless pork chops tonight. This is amazing! Thanks LoriLeiLee
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
1 user found this review helpful

Mouse's Macaroni and Cheese

Reviewed: Mar. 21, 2014
This is about as simple as you can make it...and it's delicious. A couple of points. If your sauce is grainy it's because you used pre-shredded cheese from the store. Manufactured shredding cheese has added Potato starch, corn starch and Calcium Sulfate "to prevent clumping' of the product. It also adds a delightful 'sandiness' to the final product! Sorry, but some things in the kitchen require more than 'open and pour'. Grate your cheese. Obviously Velveeta doesn't grate well. I slice 4 oz blocks off the main piece and use a wire cheese slicer on the narrow side for manageable pieces. Final, ovens vary! America's Test Kitchen did a survey among their chefs on their home ovens. Each person was given the same brand of oven thermometer (calibrated) and sent home to test. "Heat oven to 350F and record the result." The ovens actual measured temperature varied by 100 degrees F.! (300F to 400F) It didn't matter whether the oven was a $200 cheapo or a $5,000 monster...they were all inaccurate! My point? Know your oven, not just the info printed on the page. And if your oven thermometer is a $2 item from the grocery store? Well, good luck with that one. All seasonings are to taste (you're the one eating it), spices vary in source, freshness and age, quality...so the same rule applies. If you stick to the recipe, EXACTLY AS WRITTEN and it's perfect for you, you're just lucky this time. To quote Chef John, "Cooking is a process". It's not a formula.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
2 users found this review helpful

Old Fashioned Mac and Cheese

Reviewed: Mar. 20, 2014
This was the Mac and Cheese I grew up on in the 1950's. It was so good! Their are probably as many different recipes as there are Grannys and Moms. This is the way we did it, but instead of heating the milk in a pan we used a round 1.5 qt glass Casserole with matching lid. We put a layer of pasta in the bottom, layer the Velveeta (AKA: Pasteurized Cheese Product) and repeat noodles and cheese layers three times to fill. I also add extra cheese on each layer depending on left-overs in the cheese drawer. This time I added some shredded Mozzarella, a broken up slice of Pepper Jack and some Romano grated on each layer. It was spicy! In the past I have used mustard flour, Worcestershire sauce or different cheeses. It's great with Swiss, but I didn't have any. The third layer of cheese is on the top (to brown later). Finally I pour enough milk over the whole thing till it comes about half way up the casserole dish. Cover and cook for about 45 minutes, then remove the lid, raise the oven to 400F and brown 15-20 minutes (depending on your oven). One reviewer commented his dish was 'curdled'. No, the interior is a melted mix of cheese, milk and noodles, but doesn't get creamed as a Bechamel does. That's why I like it! It's 'rustic'! Thanks Jayde...and to all of you who make all those changes and additions-keep it coming! I love folks who know how to play with their food!
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
0 users found this review helpful

Crispy Orange Beef

Reviewed: Mar. 19, 2014
This is a great recipe-unique, with delicious flavors. Here are the mistakes I made that others made too. This sauce is intended to cook, flavor and crisp the meat. It's not a typical stir fry where you can just add veg for a stir fry. If you 'double the sauce' to turn it into a meat and veg. stir fry it won't work. The meat won't crisp. You will note that in the list of ingredients, the Broccoli florets are cooked separately. Don't add veg to the stir fry! Also, to help the corn starch stick, let it rest on a wire rack till the starch is 'wetted', kind of moistened and sticking to the meat before you fry. Another technique is to mix the corn starch and water (about 1/4 cup each) with a beaten egg white and dip it, then fry. You really want crispy, not gummy! If you want a veg side to go with it take a half cup of Kikkomann Marinate and Sauce, add a smashed garlic clove and let it sit on the counter. Add some diced Ginger if it makes you happy. No sugar though, you want a contrast to the sweet meat. Stir fry your veg separately and add the sauce near the end. I prefer the steamed and blanched veg for a contrast to the delicious Crispy Beef. Remember, classicaly in Asian lunch or dinner is Rice with something... not something with rice. The meat and veg is meant to be a flavor enhancer to go with your rice and to add interest; not covered in sauce or gravy. If we cut portions by a third and quit putting gravy on everything we'd all lose weight! I sure need to.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
2 users found this review helpful

Pork Chops with Raspberry Sauce

Reviewed: Mar. 11, 2014
Wonderfully delightful recipe! First of all sauteing some boneless pork chops isn't hard and they're so good all on their own. But this simple sauce is a joy. Things I will try next time: white wine instead of wine vinegar. Fresh orange juice instead of some from concentrate. In fact, how about fresh Raspberries with some sugar right now? Fresh herbs instead of dried. Keeping the chops covered on a plate and adding back the meat juices into the sauce at the end. I have some Imported Wild Lingon Berry sauce from Sweden-that's a must! We grow our own Blueberries soooooo...Someone suggested Orange Marmalade with OJ. I think I might try it, but use Raspberry juice instead. Or Cranapple? Oh, oh wait...how about using some fresh Cranberries at Thanksgiving, processing up with sugar and making this sauce for the Turkey Dinner? Oh Man! In fact I think there's a frozen breast downstairs in one of the freezers right now...then there's Chicken and Lamb and Pork roasts. This sauce definitely has the umph to stand up to grilled meats. Lets go Mexican and do fresh lime juice and Mango with Goya Adobo seasoning and a smig of cilantro, Mexican Oregano and Cumin on Baja Fish Tacos! I have stood on the shore in Ensanada at La Bufadora and had three generations of latin ladies whipping up the most amazing fish tacos for breakfast. With cold beers. Life is good! Robin, thanks for the wonderful recipe and all the inspiration. Cooking food is like jazz, improvise. 'Cause you can.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
0 users found this review helpful

Chef John's Beans and Greens

Reviewed: Mar. 10, 2014
Chef John makes it simple and delicious once again! Naturally, I made it my own. First, Escarole is not a readily available ingredient in the rural mountain town where I live. In fact no one at the grocery had ever heard of it. They suggested Collards, mustard greens or turnip greens. I choose turnip greens as I like the 'bite' and flavor and they get tender easier than collards. Next, "Honey" is a native mountain girl who swoons over butter beans and greens. My job is to make her swoon. This did it. I took a pound of large dried lima beans and 'quick soaked' them -rinsed and added to about 8 cups of hot water, brought to a boil, cooked two minutes and took off the heat. Let sit one hour and drained. ('Butter Beans' are more fragile than regular dried beans and so gentle handing is necessary). While they rested I did step 1 but did not reduce the sauce as the beans will continue to absorb liquid and need to be cooked for a while longer (I took about an hour at a low simmer with the lid cocked a little). Then I did step 2, but cooked more slowly at a simmer till the beans appeared just below the surface, gently stirring occasionally. They were al Dente and I did step 3. By now the sauce had become thick and by the time the greens were cooked the beans were tender and finished in their own creamy sauce, like Rissotto. I didn't want to put any meat in the Butter Beans and turnip Greens so just to show off I sauteed 'Pork chops with Raspberry Sauce' recipe from this site. Wow!
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
1 user found this review helpful

Stuffed Cabbage Rolls

Reviewed: Mar. 7, 2014
I love how you all 'play with your food'. I have found that the simplest traditional recipes are usually the most satisfying. And there are so many ways to make it! This one has nine basic ingredients that are in all pantries and kitchens. You can use cabbage leaves like the slavs, grape leaves like the Greeks, even pastry sheets; filled, rolled and fried like the Filipinos! Everybody loves cabbage rolls! Want fancy? Get Chef John's "Lamb in Cabbage Rolls" with 23 ingredients! It has once again started me thinking...a green leafy thing, with a kind of meat,rice and seasoning thing and some kind of tomato thing. What about stuffed collard greens, or turnip or mustard greens? Kale? Lamb, beef, Pork, Venison, Buffalo? How about Cabbage and meat Sushi, rolled in Nori with a tomato-ish dipping sauce? Rice sheets? Call it a 'Winter Roll'! There's 28 recipes here listed under "Cabbage Rolls", a full month of rolls! This is the recipe my family used, but I find that I like it much better with Pasta sauce with a little sugar added. Thanks for all the great ideas and family traditions. Personally, I'm a 'core, steam and de-vein' kind of guy...it's just how I Roll.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
1 user found this review helpful

Pasta de Sardine

Reviewed: Mar. 3, 2014
I found this a rather unusual recipe but my creative mind started to wander and I thought of sitting on the beach, grilling fresh sardines on a fire and adding it to some pasta...shortly thereafter the calculator part of my brain (the 'Money Man') kicked in and I though, "well a can of sardines runs a buck or two-for about four ounces. I can go to the fish counter and get fresh salmon for around $8 a pound or about $2 for four ounces...just like sardines. If I can afford a pound I'll get it, or a small fillet and make pasta!" then I found 'Grilled Salmon I' on this site (2600+ five stars reviews-amazing) and started thinking about asian noodles and grilled salmon, maybe a little steamed broccoli-but that's another story for another day. I haven't even cooked anything yet, but I have some copper river (Alaska) Sockeye salmon in the freezer from last fall so I now know what dinner will be tomorrow night! Grilled salmon and pasta with a salad. Using this as a 'base recipe'. Is this a great site or what? I learned to cook a little from America's test kitchen and foodnetwork, but it's this site and all you guys who taught me how to really cook. And your folks who get all torqued when people change the recipes? Calm down! Have fun! It's our food, not brain surgery! We can do what ever we want. So I gave this five stars for its inspriration. I will report back to you all with the results. And thanks to sonnychiba for the ideas.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
1 user found this review helpful

Chicken Breasts with Chipotle Green Onion Gravy

Reviewed: Feb. 25, 2014
As Chef John Says in the attendant video, " You're in charge of your gravy!" This video (and this recipe) is a cooking lesson on how to make a simple pan gravy, a techniuqe that you can use with any good protein for a delicious, quick sauce to add a finished quality to your dish. And it's simple! Saute the protein (gives you fond) add butter (or other fat) 'till it sings' then flour that browns and thickens and then a liquid (depending could be chicken or beef stock, white or red wine) and, if you wish, additional seasonings (in this case dried Chipotle chili and chopped green onion). There is your 'formula' for a pan sauce to go with any protein. Saute for fond, add a fat/oil, flour till it browns to the color you want and add your liquid and finally other spices if you wish. For a fuller, deeper flavor you can add the seasonings to the meat before you saute. One thing he didn't mention is 'tasting' as you cook, especially on a new recipe you haven't made before. As I am pretty sensitive to heat I would start with a quarter of a teaspoon of Chipotle Chili Powder, give it a minute or two to ''bloom' then taste. Need a little more? add another quarter. As many recipes state, "Salt and Pepper to taste". Same goes for other spices. So taste as you cook. Products vary; in age and quality as well our individual tastes. The quantities are suggestions on where to start, but cooking isn't Organic Chemistry, it's cooking. I love all you folks who play with your food!
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
2 users found this review helpful

Ginger Orange Brussels Sprouts

Reviewed: Feb. 18, 2014
Like Leah H, I too made this the first time from a AR video (with no attached recipe). What a wonderful combination! Juice of a fresh orange, some fresh Ginger and Brussels Sprouts. After an abusive childhood with cruciferous veggies that had to be boiled to death until they stank of sulpher I was slow to rediscover this wonderful vegetable cooked the proper way. What I did was trimmed the ends and removed damaged outer leaves, cut in half and blanched for 4 or 5 minutes. Drained, and shocked in cold tap water, returned to the pan with a little oil, the orange juice and some fresh ginger and warmed back up for a few minutes. The whole thing took less than 30 minutes and toasted pecans and dried cranberries would only make it better. Wha a delightful change of pace. Think I might try the same recipe with Broccoli....even chopped Asian cabbage....
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
0 users found this review helpful

Displaying results 1-20 (of 33) reviews
 
ADVERTISEMENT
Go Pro!

In Season

Want to Grill Tonight?
Want to Grill Tonight?

Check out time-saving recipes, because any night’s a good night to grill.

Back-to-School Eats
Back-to-School Eats

Get recipes that work for your busiest days.

Subscribe Today! Only $7.99
Subscribe Today! Only $7.99

Delicious recipes, party ideas, and helpful cooking tips! Get a year of Allrecipes magazine for just $7.99!

Most Popular Blogs

Recently Viewed Recipes

You haven't looked at any recipes lately. Get clicking!
Quick Links: Recipe Box | Shopping List | More »
 
Argentina  |  Australia & New Zealand  |  Brazil  |  Canada  |  China  |  France  |  Germany  |  India  |  Italy  |  Japan  |  Korea  |  Mexico

Netherlands  |  Poland  |  Quebec  |  Russia  |  SE Asia  |  United Kingdom & Ireland  |  United States