Deborah Chow Recipe Reviews (Pg. 1) - Allrecipes.com (1344198)

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Corned Beef Hash

Reviewed: Mar. 22, 2012
AMAZING! Granted, I made some alterations, but the recipe, as written, is a great jumping off point. First, I used leftover corned beef brisket (approx. 11 oz.), 2 medium red potatoes, 1 medium yellow onion, the cooking liquid from the corned beef, and a little beef bouillon (Better Than Bouillon, which comes in a jar, actually). I cubed the potatoes into 1/4" pieces, did the same with the onion, tossed them into a large skillet in a single layer, spooned in a little less than a tsp. of bouillon, and added enough liquid to cover them. Next, I chopped up the corned beef EXTREMELY finely - the beauty of this recipe is that it isn't hard and dry like other recipes tend to be, and part of keeping it so nice and moist is that the pieces of meat need to be tiny without being meat-paste so that they can really soften up in the cooking liquid. After the meat was chopped, it was added to the pan and everything was covered with the lid. Cranked the heat up to bring to a boil, then reduced to a medium heat for 10-15 minutes, 'til the potatoes were soft. The next part is crucial for getting a really amazing crust on your hash if you plan on frying it up. You must STIR the mixture rather vigorously until the potato cubes no longer have corners (don't mash them, just literally stir until they release some of their starch into the remaining liquid). Boil off the remaining liquid with the lid off, then start another pan over heat and fry 'til crispy and brown. Top with an egg over easy!
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12 users found this review helpful

Megan's Granola

Reviewed: Oct. 26, 2011
I've made this several times now, omitting the wheat germ and subbing in ground flax seeds, and also swapping the oil for coconut oil for a slightly different taste, and it's come out beautifully every time. I will never be without this recipe for a foolproof, crunch, delicious granola that takes any additions or substitutions like a champ!
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4 users found this review helpful

Best Brownies

Reviewed: Oct. 1, 2011
I've found that a lot of these reviews, while well-intentioned, aren't exactly as specific as I would have liked, so let me get down to the nitty gritty here. First, these are neither strictly cakey, nor strictly fudgy, though they lean much more to the fudgy side because of their small crumb, and have an intense richness that also contributes to the mouth and brain interpreting them as fudgy. Chewiness seems to generally fall somewhere in between the other two categories, but in this instance, that is not the case. These aren't the slightest bit chewy. If that's what you're looking for (which I was...), look elsewhere. To give you a better idea of how I went about constructing them to get the fudgier texture, I melted the butter in the microwave, then in the same bowl, stirred all the ingredients together by hand using a spatula. I was careful not to overmix, and stopped when everything just began coming together. To ensure they weren't overbaked, I took them out at 25 minutes and tested them with a skewer. If you don't beat the heck out of these, what you'll end up with is something that's quite light (this is where I assume people are coming up with the "cakey" designation), with a small crumb, and a fudgy, rich taste. Overall, the taste is quite good, but they weren't what I was looking for, so the search continues!
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3 users found this review helpful

Kettle Corn

Reviewed: Feb. 15, 2010
Amazing recipe! I was skeptical about getting real kettle corn taste out of something I made at home, but it worked! I had to scale down the recipe so that there'd be just enough for 2 people to consume in one sitting, and I used a Stir Crazy machine. For 2 quarts, I used 1/3 cup of white popcorn, 3 tbsp. oil, and 3 tbsp. plus a pinch of white sugar. I did the 3 kernel test, and then added the sugar and waited for it to melt, but it seemed the longer I waited for it to melt, the less melty the sugar looked, so when it got to a sort of clumpy consistency, I figured I'd better add the corn, but I wasn't expecting much, as I watched everything turn around with clumps of sugar peppering the kernals. Once the corn was all popped, I immediately turned it out onto a foil lined sheet pan, sprinkled it all with salt, and had a taste. Perfection! The sugar lumps managed to melt in time and coat every single piece with just enough crispy, sugary goodness, and it really did have that brown, sugary, oily flavor that kettle corn is all about. This is going to be a staple in my household from now on!
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Best Big, Fat, Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookie

Reviewed: Sep. 3, 2009
Ok, that's it. I am officially deleting every other chocolate chip cookie recipe I've saved from allrecipes in the past 10 years or so. THIS IS THE ONE! I've tried so many different recipes, from the original Tollhouse, to Alton Brown's, to the Neiman Marcus cookies, to cookies with shortening, cookies with powdered pudding, you name it. All have been ok, some better than others, but this cookie, this glorious cookie, is the one I've been looking for all these years. It is crisp on the edges, soft in the middle, not cakey in the least bit, not too dense, and just heavenly. The only thing I did differently was to increase the salt a bit, as I was using pure sea salt, which is a bit less salty than regular table salt, and I decreased the white sugar by just a smidge (didn't measure how much I omitted though). I also made sure not to beat the eggs too much so that there wouldn't be a lot of air incorporated into the dough. And the only quibble I have is that this didn't make 18 cookies. Not even close. It made 10, and that was using just under 1/4 measurements for each cookie, but batch size is irrelevant when you're talking about taste perfection. Make this cookie! You will not be sorry.
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4 users found this review helpful

Lola's Horchata

Reviewed: Apr. 5, 2009
Great recipe! I never thought it'd be so easy to make horchata, and now I can have it whenever I want. I did do a couple things differently, just to speed up the process and make things a little easier for me, so that mine was done in about an hour. Instead of only blending up the rice for a minute, I blended the rice + 2 cups of water for a good long while, probably 5+ minutes, also pulsing until the rice was as fine as it seemed it would go. Then, I put a couple teaspoons of ground cinnamon into a coffee filter, gathered the top, stapled it shut, and dropped that into the rice mixture so the flavor would come out during the "steeping" time. I left it about an hour, coming back to pulse the blender every so often. (Don't forget to temporarily remove the cinnamon pouch when pulsing if you're going to do this.) After an hour, I gave it one last whir in the blender, strained it through a fine-meshed sieve, then put it back in the blender with a dash more cinnamon, the sugar, vanilla and milk, then served right away with ice. It was perfect! It had all the rice flavor I was expecting, and didn't take nearly as long as I thought it would, which I think can be attributed to pulsing up the rice so fine to begin with. The result was the perfect horchata - just like at my favorite Mexican restaurants.
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16 users found this review helpful

Hummus III

Reviewed: Feb. 15, 2009
Great recipe, and as everyone has mentioned, you can jazz it up according to your own tastes. I used the recipe as a loose guideline and ended up making something that tastes almost exactly the same as my favorite restaurant hummus, except that I think they use freshly boiled beans. 2 cans of beans with a bit of their liquid, 5 spoonfuls (which I'd estimate to be probably 4 or 5 tbsp.) of tahini, a good pinch of salt, 3 cloves of garlic, and the juice of one lemon was all it needed to be amazing. I didn't bother with the paprika, olive oil or parsley because it's mostly just a garnish, and I've never felt that the extra oil on top added anything special to the dip. I sliced up some mini peppers to serve this with and settled in for an amazing midnight snack. Just a note for anyone who is concerned about their tahini when they open the can. It's likely that it'll separate, just like real peanut butter tends to. DO NOT throw out the oil - it'll just be a rock without it. Take a spoon or a fork and slowly work the oil into the hard paste at the bottom of the can. It can take several minutes to get it all incorporated, but once it's done, the texture will be just right, and you won't have a wasted can of expensive, rock-hard sesame paste on your hands.
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5 users found this review helpful

Microwave Oven Peanut Brittle

Reviewed: Aug. 1, 2008
After recently moving, I thought I'd lost my copy of this recipe that I'd faithfully posted on my refrigerator. Thank goodness I remembered I'd originally gotten it here! First things first, I used macadamia nuts, as opposed to peanuts, almonds or cashews (though I have made it with the last two nuts, and have loved it!). They were regular salted, dry roasted macadamia nuts that I broke up a bit by putting them into a heavy duty zip-top bag, and tapping with a meat mallet. I added them right into the sugar/corn syrup mixture in the beginning to make sure they'd get nice and toasted, and did they ever! Delicious! Second thing to note, I have a 1300 watt microwave. To offset the discrepancy in wattage, I microwaved it in my large Pyrex bowl for 4 minutes instead of 6, and then the second round went for 2 minutes, and came out perfectly. Third thing to note, you don't have to get anything fancy to pour this stuff out onto. I've always used Reynolds Release foil (the non-stick stuff), and it comes off like a dream. Just chuck the foil in the recycling bin at the end, and cleanup is finished.
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12 users found this review helpful

Jam Filled Butter Cookies

Reviewed: Jul. 24, 2008
These are basically no-fail, and absurdly delicious. I had a craving for something with strawberry preserves, and so that's what I used to fill them. I cut the recipe down to 24 cookies so that it'd accommodate the one stick of butter (1/2 cup) that I had on hand, and although all I had was salted butter, which you're not supposed to use for baking, and I didn't add the extra 1/2 of an egg yolk, these came out absolutely perfectly. The result was lightly brown, very crisp, buttery, and the little bit of added salt from the butter gave them a little more depth of flavor. Great, forgiving recipe that you can truly throw together with what you have on hand!
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Easy Key Lime Pie I

Reviewed: Jul. 19, 2007
If you're looking for a light, fluffy pie, look elsewhere. There seem to be a lot of differing preferences when it comes to texture, and for those who want a creamy filling, this is the pie for you. I used about 2/3C lime juice and the zest of half of my key limes, and then baked it about 5 minutes extra, and this still wasn't quite tart enough for me, but the flavor was out of this world. The recipe I'm looking for has a bit lighter texture than this one does though, so although this was wonderful for a creamy dessert, I'm going to give Key Lime Pie I a try, and see if that's a bit closer to what I had in mind. All in all, this makes for an amazing, creamy pie.
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Microwave Peanut Brittle

Reviewed: Dec. 29, 2006
I burned my batch, but that was my fault, as I stuck the mixture in for a little extra time because I was convinced it wasn't going to be brown enough. Well, it definitely was. At the stage before adding the baking soda, it was very light, but as soon as the soda went in - BOOM, almost instantaneous darkening. So next time, I'll follow the recipe (aside from adding a bit more baking soda for a lighter brittle), and I'm sure this will be excellent. Even the burnt batch isn't so bad, so I know that one done properly will be out of this world.
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Chinese Chicken Salad III

Reviewed: Nov. 1, 2006
What a great, easy salad! I did a few things to make it quicker. First, I bought a bag of tri-colored cole slaw mix (I prefer cabbage to lettuce in this kind of salad). Second, I used a roasted chicken from the grocery store and just shredded that instead of baking my own. As far as the dressing goes, I took other reviewer's advice and used some Mandarin orange juice to thin the dressing. I also ommitted the ginger (hate it), and left the brown sugar out because it was by far sweet enough without it. With some minor modifications to fit my taste, this salad totally hit the spot, and I'll be eating it for days to come! (To help with the ease-factor, I made a big batch of the dressing to keep in the fridge, pre-chopped up my scallions and cilantro and added it to my cole slaw mix, so that all I have to do is shred some chicken and drizzle my dressing, and I'm set to go.
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3 users found this review helpful

Simple Whole Wheat Bread

Reviewed: May 6, 2005
Great bread! The most difficult task is waiting for the dough to rise, and aside from that, a trusty Kitchen Aid or a pair of willing hands is all you need for a wonderful snack. 3 loaves is a bit much for a single person, but it keeps well in the fridge (and from what I've read here, the freezer as well). I used solely whole wheat flour and left out all of the butter to eliminate the fat from this recipe and it came out beautifully. Next time, I'll leave out all the honey (I put that on my toast after the fact anyway) and cut the recipe in a third to make a great, lower calorie bread that's perfect for a quick carb meal.
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5 users found this review helpful

Roasted Tomato Salsa I

Reviewed: Apr. 1, 2004
This salsa is phenomenal! I've been looking for a recipe that would come close to the salsa you get at Chevy's and this did it. I did change a few things, however. Instead of one, I used 3 jalapenos, which I removed the ribs and seeds from prior to roasting. I also omitted the cumin because I wanted a fresher taste, added a good amount of black pepper (I once got a look at the actual recipe for Chevy's salsa and remembered there being something like 2lbs of black pepper in it-of course, in proportion to the massive amounts of tomatoes it called for), and put in about a tsp. of liquid smoke to add to the roasty flavor. This recipe makes A LOT of salsa, so be prepared to have a full belly from eating so much of it!
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Aunt Teen's Creamy Chocolate Fudge

Reviewed: Feb. 12, 2004
What a great fudge recipe. I've been looking for something like this for some time now. There's no danger of it becoming a soupy mess, and no danger of it being grainy and undissolved tasting. Everyone I've served it to has raved about it, and I even forgot to put in the vanilla! The only other modification I made was to only use 1 cup of sugar as opposed to the full amount because I didn't want it to be cloyingly sweet. Yum, yum!
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4 users found this review helpful

Raspberry and Almond Shortbread Thumbprints

Reviewed: Dec. 10, 2003
I had such high hopes for this recipe, but it just didn't happen. The cookies came out flat as pancakes with jam centers. I was even sure to refrigerate the batter (and I say batter because it was SO wet and sticky) before rolling it. I ended up adding in an extra cup of flour before the cookies would hold their shape. 2 cups of flour just doesn't seem like it can be the right amount to be combined with a cup of butter. The recipe I used prior to this one called for 3/4 cup of butter and 3 1/2 cups of flour, but I thought I'd try this one because I wanted something less flour-y tasting. With the addition of the extra flour these came out just fine, but I'm still going to look for the perfect thumbprint recipe.
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Mall Pretzels

Reviewed: Aug. 9, 2003
Amazing pretzels! I was a bit afraid of making them because although a lot of people said they were great, some said they were too bready and difficult to work with. Not so. And this recipe is SO forgiving. First, I found that I didn't have any brown sugar so I ended up using regular granulated sugar. Then, I didn't have bread flour, so I only used all-purpose. Rolling them did prove to be a bit time consuming because they tend to spring back, but I found that a combination of rolling and picking them up to let gravity stretch them worked well. Also, because I was working on a short surface, I didn't have room for the entire 3 feet, but I did find that as I got each part to the desired thickness, I could wrap it around one hand to get it out of the way and continue rolling the rest with the other hand. I salted them before putting them in the oven, and rather than baking on parchment, I used well-buttered foil. The bottoms came out nice and crunchy and buttery, and the rest was chewy and soft. I made a garlic butter by just putting some minced garlic and butter in a pan and heating until the rawness was gone and dipped the hot pretzels in that rather than putting the topping directly on the pretzel. So yum and so easy!
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166 users found this review helpful

Savory Garlic Marinated Steaks

Reviewed: Aug. 6, 2003
This marinade is fantastic. I always omit the wochestershire sauce and the liquid smoke, and add in more garlic (probably in the neighborhood of 10-15 cloves, minced), and half a bottle of beer. Everyone that's ever had my ribeyes has raved. As a bonus, I tried heating the marinade and turning it into a sauce by adding a bit of butter, cornstarch/water, and a can of beef broth and it was great!
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Grilled Onions

Reviewed: Aug. 6, 2003
What an amazing recipe! And SO easy. I didn't really believe that this would taste like french onion soup, but it really does. Just be sure your coals are really hot, because the onions will take quite a while to get really nice and soft. I tried doing some over medium coals with large onions and it took almost 2 hours. If you really want the french onion soup experience you can put the onion with the juice (and there is a LOT of juice) into an oven-safe bowl, add slices of french bread, top with cheese and throw it under the broiler until the cheese is melted. Alone, this recipe is fantastic though. I make it all the time now and it's always a hit!
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26 users found this review helpful

Deep Dish Brownies

Reviewed: Jul. 14, 2003
I tried the Mmm-Mmm Better brownies from this site and liked this recipe SO much better. This one definitely came out more fudgy, and much more brownie-like. As per other's suggestions I only used 2 eggs and omitted the baking powder. I'm still searching for a seriously rich, chewy, yet solid brownie so I'll keep trying, but this recipe is definitely worth making at least once.
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5 users found this review helpful

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