flacaConfectionist Recipe Reviews (Pg. 1) - Allrecipes.com (13178405)

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Dripping Roast Beef Sandwiches with Melted Provolone

Reviewed: Dec. 14, 2010
Absolutely to die for! The first time, I followed the recipe exactly. The second time, I took a frozen beef roast (salted and peppered it) and put it in the crock pot in the morning, then by afternoon it was tender and perfectly done. This I sliced and returned to the crock pot to soak up some of the drippings while I prepared the soup/worcestershire mix and split the French bread rolls I bought this time from the bakery section at my local super Walmart. I used a slotted spoon to add the meat to the soup, but wasn't overly concerned with the drippings getting into the soup either. Then, after it was heated, I used metal tongs to add the meat to the rolls and spooned on the soup. A half slice of provolone fit perfectly on these smaller rolls; it was a perfect dinner portion size too! Served it with pasta salad and baked beans. So easy, delicious and much cheaper than buying deli roast beef, so I will be making it this way again and again.
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32 users found this review helpful

Amish Friendship Bread Starter

Reviewed: Feb. 2, 2009
So easy to make, but it stinks as it ages. I followed the advice of other reviewers here by covering the plastic bowl with a paper towel and using only wooden spoons to stir the recipe once per day. The mixture never stopped bubbling up for me. However, I used self-rising flour (as it was on hand), so I wonder if that made a difference.
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18 users found this review helpful

Mom's Best Peanut Brittle

Reviewed: Dec. 21, 2008
Do not alter this recipe, except to add more nuts if you're utterly crazy about them. My only qualm with peanut brittle involves pulling the brittle at the end because it cools so quickly, but other reviewers addressed this topic by suggesting that you put the pan in the oven before pouring the mixture onto it. Therefore, parchment paper (which can go in the oven) trumps wax paper and foil (which must be buttered and leaves a greasy side on your cooled brittle) for this recipe.
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17 users found this review helpful

Easy Baklava

Reviewed: Nov. 1, 2010
I just tried the baklava I made, which varied only slightly from this recipe, and it's not super sweet but still rather yummy. I used all pecans for the filling, instead of the mixed nuts the recipe called for, and I used dried grated lemon peel (instead of fresh lemon zest) as well as raw honey in the syrup mixture. I buttered each of the layers using a pastry brush dipped in melted margarine, but using only as much margarine as I needed to lightly coat each layer [each layer really being a set of two sheets of the dough]. I also cut the baklava into the traditional triangles [or how it is typically sold] prior to pouring the syrup mixture into it, so that the syrup could cut through the layers. Because I had all my ingredients ready and measured out in advance, I found no need to cover the dough with a damp cloth in between adding the layers. Phyllo dough tears so easily, it's wonderful how the boxes it is sold in these days include sheets that fit about perfectly into a 9 x 13" pan (with no need to cut it in half), so layering it all took some patience but came to roughly the half hour the recipe said it would. Thanks for sharing this recipe, Arvillalar! Surely, it's a keeper.
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12 users found this review helpful

Real Chiles Rellenos

Reviewed: May 6, 2010
Thanks so much for taking the time to post this awesome dish, *Fat~Dog! To be fair, I love this dish but my kids hated it. To me, the breaded and cheese-filled peppers reminded me of being off the beaten path in Cancun to eat dinner: so delicious! The accompanying sauce I did not so favor, though I could not find Mexican Stewed Tomatoes nor Mexican Oregano, so I had to use the usual versions of those and instead added a little bit of chile peppers and their juice to the sauce which surely would have changed it. This is a rather labor-intensive dish, so start making it well in advance of a meal. I would also recommend just deep-frying the peppers to ensure the cheese inside melts thoroughly.
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8 users found this review helpful

Mexican Rice III

Reviewed: Jun. 14, 2013
I really like the flavor of this rice, but it was rather spicy (even after I had seeded most of the jalapeno in it). I doubled the recipe, and added a teaspoon of chicken base to it (because I had no bouillon cubes), but also added too much cumin toward the end of cooking it. My two-year-old spit it out, and said "spicy" for the first time in her life. I think next time, I will fully seed the jalapenos and stick to the measurement of cumin shown in the recipe (or less). If it was not so much work, it probably would not taste so good that I went back for seconds.
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7 users found this review helpful

Chocolate Peanut Butter Squares

Reviewed: Mar. 4, 2011
This should be called "Chocolate Peanut Butter Crack" it's so addictive. That said, I followed others' advice by: *cutting the sugar down to 3c. *mixing the sugar together with 1 3/4c. graham cracker crumbs first *adding the peanut butter to the melted butter while it was still in the sauce pan on the stove, so that it combined well before adding it to the dry ingredients *pressed the peanut butter mixture into a 9x13" glass pan [lined in foil] by using the back of a metal spoon *melted 1c. milk chocolate chips and 1c. semi-sweet chocolate chips with about 4 tbsp. butter for the topping You cannot eat just one of these.
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5 users found this review helpful

Peppermint Brittle

Reviewed: Apr. 18, 2010
Add a teaspoon (or more) of peppermint extract to this recipe. Also, it helps if you own a food processor to smash up those candy canes, as it creates a little powder along with those chunks of peppermint to stir into the chocolate, which likewise boosts the peppermint flavor some.
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4 users found this review helpful

Danish Kringle

Reviewed: Dec. 23, 2012
Very good stuff! I made three kinds: the original recipe, one with raspberry filling atop a cream cheese mixture (with powdered sugar and 1/8 tsp. of almond extract), as well as one with just strawberry filling. I doubled the recipe to make double of each of these flavors [the raspberry one was also topped in slivered almonds], and I shaped two raspberry danishes into a giant wreath by using a round pizza pan to bake them. All but the strawberry ones look lovely, because the strawberry ran like crazy but tasted delicious anyway. The pastry reminds me of kolachies, although not so sweet since they are rolled out in flour instead of powdered sugar. The dough would also probably be a pretty easy pie crust to make.
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3 users found this review helpful

To Die For Blueberry Muffins

Reviewed: Apr. 26, 2012
So good! I followed the recipe almost precisely, but also doubled it all. I had no buttermilk on hand, which other reviewers mentioned using, so I made my own [1c. milk, 2T white vinegar; stir and let sit five minutes], and I used the entirety of that because the base of this recipe was so thick. Other than that, I might go get some large-crystal sugar to top these next time, but I also like the crunch the original recipe gives you. Doubling the recipe gave me 21 normal-sized, perfectly-domed muffins I strongly recommend to all. You do not need vanilla, by the way.
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3 users found this review helpful

Slow Cooker Beef Stroganoff I

Reviewed: Mar. 4, 2011
Really amazing stroganoff, with the following modifications (mostly based on others' reviews so far): 1) Sliced up a london broil instead of using stew meat 2) Doubled the rest of the recipe, except for the Worchestshire and cream cheese (the latter of which I omitted entirely) 3) Added powered garlic (maybe half a tablespoon), pepper to taste, 3 beef bullion cubes, about a 1/4 c. of beef stock and a full pack of dry onion soup 4) Used sour cream to taste instead of cream cheese, regular cream of mushroom soup and a pint of fresh mushrooms wrapped in cheesecloth (which I left in throughout the cooking process, so I could hold some of the stroganoff back --for those of us who really do not like mushrooms --before returning them freely to the sauce). Everyone cleaned their plates. To be clear, doubling the recipe meant using a cup of chopped onion. However, I used three cans of condensed mushroom soup because it was smelling so onion-y and since I had so much meat in there, but the fresh mushrooms surely also helped the overall flavor of this dish for us. Also, I forgot to add any water, but it did not need it anyway. Really, the way I made it varies quite a bit from the original recipe, but if not for this recipe I would have just been using the same old seasoning packets we have relied on for years and this is so much better I have to give it five stars regardless for inspiring me to tinker with it. Thanks for sharing it!
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3 users found this review helpful

French Baguettes

Reviewed: Oct. 6, 2010
These baguettes are ideal for slicing up to place atop a bowl French onion soup. I doubled the recipe, and made the dough by hand because I couldn't find my bread machine. I also proofed the water, yeast and sugar before adding the flour and salt, as others had suggested. After I formed the loaves, I froze two of them, covered in lots of plastic wrap. (I would also use foil if freezing it for a longer period than that, though.) Making this dough by hand was utterly worth it to make an authentic French onion soup, complete with Guyere and mozzarella cheeses melted on top after all, but rather time-consuming to collectively do. So, I have got to find my bread machine for the next time I make this. Thanks for sharing this recipe, Judy!
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3 users found this review helpful

Holiday Peppermint Bark

Reviewed: Sep. 14, 2009
If you use the microwave to melt the chocolate, keep a close eye on it! It is done when some of the pieces still hold their shape but are nonetheless gooey, so don't over-nuke them! Stir it frequently to check on it. (If you find it drying out, try adding butter to smooth it out!) I usually use candy canes, which I put in the food processor on pulse. This easily creats some of that fine dust that others say to reserve for the top for a nice sheen. The best candy to use for this, though, are the semi-soft sort of peppermint sticks, but just put them in a plastic bag and beat them with a rolling pin, as they are a little trickier to work with, but they melt in your mouth! After you let the mixture cool, slam the bark on the counter, and use a real sharp knife to drive the tip into bigger pieces in order to further break them up. This tip is really useful if you make big batches like I do that can result in rather thick pieces. The original recipe here is pretty basic, so you can jazz it up however you like. I give this recipe four stars because it did not mention any peppermint oil, which adds a lovely extra hint of flavor to it that is simply a must, in my opinion.
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3 users found this review helpful

Lemon Herb Chicken

Reviewed: Jun. 11, 2009
Delicious. Not the simplest meal to make, but worth the wait while the chicken cooks in the sauce, as it smells wonderful. I used chicken thighs and dried herbs, which is what I had on hand, but I otherwise followed the recipe exactly. Served with similarly seasoned rice and green beans.
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3 users found this review helpful

Downeast Maine Pumpkin Bread

Reviewed: Oct. 24, 2013
Oh my gosh! Thank you so much for this wonderfully adaptable recipe, Laurie! The few changes I made included adding a couple shakes of allspice, 1 tsp. of vanilla extract (if that made any difference whatsoever) and using cinnamon applesauce in place of the water. I didn't honestly think this recipe needed any more five-star reviews, but there's my two-cents on it, too. Finally, I greased my two glass 9x5" pans with butter-flavored Crisco, and dusted them with flour. It took a bit longer for the loaves to finish baking, therefore, by about ten minutes or so. UPDATE: This is the second time I have made this. This time I used 1 1/4c. more pumpkin, only half a cup of oil, no water, and added a few shakes of pumpkin pie spice to the original recipe otherwise. It tastes wonderful and more like pumpkin bread than a spice bread this way. I will do it this from now on. Still, thank you Laurie, for posting this recipe!
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2 users found this review helpful

My Amish Friend's Caramel Corn

Reviewed: Jun. 14, 2013
After having made this several times, I think that the caramel sauce is cooked to a point just prior to it burning. So, it is a little tricky to make and simple to scorch, but totally worth trying and I highly recommend it (with or without nuts). We keep an empty pretzel rod container we had gotten at BJs, just to store this when I make it. I use loose popcorn and unsalted butter instead of oil.
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2 users found this review helpful

French Onion Soup Gratinee

Reviewed: Sep. 22, 2010
My whole family loved this soup -- even my 8-year-old (a finicky eater who at first said she didn't want any of it) told me how good it is. I quadrupled the recipe and am freezing half of it now. (It all just barely fit into our largest stock pot.) It's a feat to stir 16 finely-sliced onions at once, but stir them frequently [with someone else holding the pot in place, if you're making this much at one time] lest they burn. I also left the seasonings (which I had tied up in cheesecloth) in the soup about a half hour longer than the recipe said, as it took a while to simmer and I was going by taste at that point. Of the eight sweet onions called for in the recipe, I instead used large yellow onions, as I had them on hand already. I also used grated (rather than sliced) Gruyere and mozzarella for the cheeses, omitted the paprika and for the bread used the French Baguettes Recipe by Judy Taubert, here: http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/French-Baguettes/Detail.aspx. This is the first time my 20-year-old niece ever tried French onion soup, so her frame of reference for it will forever be skewed to this high mark -- it's that good. It took us together three hours from prep to finish to make just this much of this soup, but it was really worth it to make that French bread to go with it, so take that extra step if you can. Thanks for sharing this recipe, Jersey Tomato! It's a keeper.
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2 users found this review helpful

Amazing Ginger Snaps

Reviewed: Dec. 11, 2013
Rather decent recipe, so thank you for sharing it! I was looking for something to make for this year's cookie exchange, and this fits the bill nicely. I decided to try it out today, and will be making 12 dozen of these two weeks from now, after all. My toddler is fully enjoying this cookie with a small glass of milk. Having just made the cookies today, I find the crunchy edges and inner chewiness delightfully seasonal and a nice change from other run-of-the-mill cookie exchange fare. I wonder if any will last until tomorrow to see if the texture or taste improves from what impressed me today. The only thing I did different from the recipe was to use vegetable oil. Oh, I also lightly sprayed the pans and only halfway rolled the cookies in sugar, trying to prevent any from sticking to the pan, in case that was going to happen otherwise.
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1 user found this review helpful

Light Wheat Rolls

Reviewed: Jul. 9, 2013
Wow, Katrina, thanks so much for submitting this recipe! I made these in the Kitchen Aid, using the dough hook. I followed the recipe precisely, except it needed less white flour to start pulling away from the bowl. Also, I baked them on cookie sheets, and got a dozen nice-sized rolls. I will be making them again and again.
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1 user found this review helpful

Aunt Teen's Creamy Chocolate Fudge

Reviewed: Jul. 5, 2012
I love this basic recipe, but I use a couple of tweaks on it: double the recipe but nix the nuts, use a half cup less sugar and a handful more chocolate chips, then fully stir in at least 3/4 c. peanut butter. This is how I make my mother's favorite fudge from her childhood, just like my grandma made! Also, have everything measured out in advance, including a baking sheet lined with aluminum foil and very lightly sprayed with canola oil. After you pour the fudge onto the tray, cover it in plastic wrap and run over that with a rolling pin for a smoother presentation. Be sure to remove the plastic wrap while it cools.
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1 user found this review helpful

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