Baricat Recipe Reviews (Pg. 4) - Allrecipes.com (131039)

cook's profile

Baricat

Reviews

Menus

 
View All Reviews Learn more

Beef Pot Roast

Reviewed: Dec. 13, 2011
Calling this "Beef Pot Roast" is a bit like calling a Lamborghini a "vehicle," or the Mona Lisa a "picture." Maybe "Beef Ambrosia" is more fitting. No disagreement with any of the stellar reviews. This is a celebration of wholesome goodness, of simpler times before dinner meant grabbing take-out, a pizza, or fast food. The flavor is that of the beef without adornment. I made it almost verbatim. I had found two thick top round steaks which I had bought longer ago than I care to mention here, languishing in my chest freezer. They came to 4+ pounds altogether. So the cut was substituted for chuck. After browning, I stacked them in the Dutch oven. I simply cut the cooking time by 30 minutes, since top round is a much leaner and more tender cut than chuck. Fabulous! The meat was fork-tender. Whereas calling the resulting liquid "gravy" is a stretch, turning it into such was a simple matter of whisking 3 Tb of flour into about 4 Tb beef stock, adding to the pan liquid, and simmering for 10 minutes. Poured over the meat with braised carrots and sauteed mushrooms, nestled lovingly on a cushy bed of homemade spaetzle, it was a meal fit for a sultan. Ladies, if there's a man in your life you'd like to marry, make him this dish. He'll follow you anywhere and be yours for LIFE!!!!
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
21 users found this review helpful

The Best Meatballs You'll Ever Have

Reviewed: Dec. 4, 2011
We weren't fans. The Cajun spice didn't work for us, nor did the overwhelming taste of mustard. If you were to remove those two items, you would be left with a bland product. They fared slightly better when served with a brown gravy than they did with tomato sauce and pasta, with which the flavor was decidedly incongruous. They left a very strange aftertaste, and after trying them those two ways, hoping to salvage them, we ended up cutting our losses and pitching them.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
8 users found this review helpful
Photo by Baricat

New York Italian Pizza Dough

Reviewed: Dec. 3, 2011
Just enjoying a slice of pie made with this dough recipe, and it's hard not to keep going back and goo-ing up my hands with "one more bite" of it until I finish this review! The quintessential New York pizza has a thin, seared crust layer on the bottom, with light, ethereal bread topped with a thin layer of sauce, cheese, and whatever other items ring your bells. This does not disappoint on any score. This dough stretches easily to supreme thinness when allowed to rest as recommended in the fridge. That's one detraction, that you need to plan ahead. But it can be made and rested for up to 2 days, so no problem. A baking stone is a must for success, as when it's preheated, it will sear the bottom of the crust by instantly drawing out the surface moisture. As for "blandness" that some dislike, remember that a great crust acts as a backdrop for your accoutrements. It's not the star. It is, however, a very important supporting player. If desired, you can flavor it with herbs and/or a few Tb of Parmesan. I found the dough to be too sticky with the proportions listed. Whereas I fully understand that a pizza dough needs as little flour as possible, no way could you work with it, until I added about 1/4 cup of flour, which left it still very sticky, but able to be handled with floured hands. Experiment. You want it sticky, but not quasi-liquid. You're going to love this crust. Second-generation Italian girl here, New York born and raised, and I can tell you, THIS is the real deal.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
30 users found this review helpful

Double Crust Stuffed Pizza

Reviewed: Dec. 1, 2011
Can't believe I never got around to reviewing this great recipe! I've made it twice, once exactly as written and the second time with my own sauce, which for our palates improved things tremendously. The sauce recipe, which is slightly sweet and disappointingly bland, loses one star. If a nice, hearty, appropriately spiced tomato sauce is used, however, the recipe benefits exponentially, and it's catapulted into the 5 star stratosphere. Also, I added about 1/2 cup of the sauce to the filling ingredients in the middle which increased our enjoyment and tied everything together nicely. It's extremely filling, and no one but the heartiest of eaters will be able to consume more than one slice without busting a gut. Because of the fat in the sausage, which melds into the crust as it bakes, it's not healthy, but this is a favorite, very occasional guilty pleasure in this house.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
4 users found this review helpful

Honey Vanilla Ice Cream

Reviewed: Nov. 16, 2011
Oh, my freakin' WORD!!! This will have to be kept under lock and key to keep me from making myself sick gobbling it all up before the holiday. I made it today to have for serving on top of Thanksgiving pies, and it's so unbelievably delicious that it's a major temptation. The marriage of honey and vanilla is sheer genius! The honey is just barely discernible, but it complements the vanilla flavor to perfection. I didn't have any whole milk, so I substituted fat-free half and half. No matter. The texture is wonderful, the flavor sublime. It melts in a silken ribbon on the tongue, leaving a delightful taste on the palate that makes you crave another spoonful. I cut back on the brown sugar by 25% after reading several reviews that noted excessive sweetness. After tasting the solution, it was just a bit short of sweetness, so I simply added about 2 Tb Splenda to make it just right. Awesome!
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
7 users found this review helpful

Belgian Molasses Bread

Reviewed: Nov. 16, 2011
The molasses contributes a very unique, earthy flavor to this soft bread. I didn't change a thing, and the result was a perfect bread for sandwiches or toast. Be aware that although the texture is nice and moist, it does crumb significantly when cut. When we just couldn't eat it fast enough to keep it from getting stale, I took those leftover pieces that weren't fresh anymore, and gave them new life in the Bread Pudding II recipe from this site. Wow! That was the best bread pudding I've ever eaten. No matter what you use this for, it could not possibly be better.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
5 users found this review helpful

Pumpkin Bread IV

Reviewed: Nov. 15, 2011
In a word, WOW! This always turns out wonderfully moist. I have made it with pureed sweet potato, as well, and there is very little, if any, difference in flavor or texture. I sub Splenda for half the sugar, and no one who has not been told is ever any the wiser. I increase the spices according to my family's tastes, with the exception of cloves, and add 1-1/2 tsp ginger plus a generous dash of cayenne pepper for a hint of warmth. That never fails to make the guys go wild for this! I also add 2 Tb dark rum, which you can't taste in the finished product, but which adds a great depth of flavor, underscoring the spices to perfection. One noteworthy item...If made in a 9"X13" loaf pan as indicated, the resulting loaves are a bit shallow. It makes a much more impressive presentation if you bake it in a loaf pan of 8"X4", adding about 10-15 minutes to the baking time. Test at 50 minutes, then add time accordingly as necessary. Freezes well. What a fabulous recipe this is!
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
6 users found this review helpful

Bread Pudding II

Reviewed: Nov. 12, 2011
Outstanding! Phenomenal! ...and any other superlative you care to use. I had some Belgian Molasses Bread (another Allrecipes treat) left over, and crumbled it up to use in this. As much as I liked that bread, it was amazing in this! I used all Splenda, as I'm diabetic, and cut back the eggs to 3, based on other reviews. Added a generous dash of allspice and cloves to the cinnamon, and substituted fat-free half and half for 1 cup of the milk, using skim for the rest. Dotted the top with only 1 Tb butter (to cut calories) - no need to pre-melt it. Baked it for 55 minutes. At 45, there was still some liquid at the very bottom, so popped it back in for another 10 minutes. We just loved the juxtaposition of the crunchy crust against the creamy interior. No one could tell it was made completely free of added sugar, and very low fat, making it almost guilt-free. As a bonus, it's high in protein and calcium. Not many desserts can make that claim. Fabulous enough for company, served warm with either a scoop of vanilla ice cream or a dollop of real, lightly sweetened, vanilla-laced whipped cream.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
9 users found this review helpful

Ginger Creams

Reviewed: Nov. 6, 2011
This is an old Betty Crocker recipe from the 50s and 60s. They are soft, spicy, moist and cake-like. When we're sending them somewhere or are taking them to someone's house or a bake sale, we like to sprinkle them with sugar spiked with ground ginger and a pinch of cinnamon before putting them in the oven. That makes a neat substitute for the messy frosting, which always makes the cookies stick together unless you put them in a single layer in the tin, which is near impossible. This also cuts down on kitchen time. If you don't like the flavor of molasses, dark corn syrup can be successfully substituted for half or all of it, which gives a somewhat different, more subtle taste, while still retaining the appealing soft texture. The house becomes wonderfully fragrant as they bake. A family favorite - I kept the cookie jar full of these for the kids as they were growing up, and it's one of their fondest memories.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
7 users found this review helpful

Pumpkin Cake

Reviewed: Nov. 4, 2011
Lovely, moist, perfectly spiced autumn treat. I have used both pumpkin, as written, as well as mashed sweet potato, which I quick-cooked in the microwave, then slipped them out of their skins and mashed. No discernible taste difference. Absolutely fantastic! I always cut the sugar back to 2 cups, and it comes out just right to our palates. I also add a tsp of ground ginger, which complements pumpkin/sweet potato to perfection. Wonderful, heritage-calibre recipe.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
8 users found this review helpful

Cranapana Bread

Reviewed: Oct. 25, 2011
Meh. I loved the name, so I just had to make it. The texture is nice and moist. No problem with its rising, and no problem baking it through in 60 minutes. Not dense at all, relatively light/airy for a quick bread, presumably because of the high proportion of baking powder in self rising flour. We liked the burst of tart cranberries in it, as well as the hint of banana flavor. The apples are lost in the flavor, but they contribute moisture, and that's about the extent of their role. In fact, the overall taste is rather bland and unexciting in its totality. It's not very sweet when you consider that those cranberries are pretty darned tart. 3-1/2 stars would be more appropriate, as 3 is too low and 4 is too high. There are so many other quick bread recipes on this site that are knock-outs that it makes no sense to go with one that only offers a mediocre taste that goes nowhere. Not bad, but certainly unremarkable, and for us, just not worth the calories. For this reason, after a slice to sample the finished product, sadly, the rest was trash can fodder.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
5 users found this review helpful

Homemade Pancake Syrup

Reviewed: Sep. 27, 2011
Why ever pay a fortune for expensive syrup from the grocery store anymore, when you probably have most of the ingredients to make this in your pantry already? Maple extract isn't very expensive and one bottle will make several batches. I added just a dash of cinnamon to the syrup before simmering. If it's not thick enough to suit your tastes, you can simmer it another couple of minutes, even if you only make that discovery after cooling. Just put it back into the saucepan, bring it to a simmer, and continue for another 2-3 minutes (longer if you like it really thick.) If you accidentally boil it down too long, so that it gets too thick, add a touch of water and blend in. When the syrup was cool and I tried it, the maple flavor needed to be just a little stronger, so I added another 1/4 tsp extract to satisfy our palates. Also added about 2 tsp butter, and it tastes just like Mrs. Butterworth. Now I just use the bottle, and fill it with this. Great money saver, and better flavor.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
3 users found this review helpful

Sherika's Easy Corn Fudge

Reviewed: Sep. 19, 2011
What can I say? I'm simply speechless.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
11 users found this review helpful

Mom's Buttercream Frosting

Reviewed: Aug. 30, 2011
This is an old chestnut! I've been making this recipe for over 30 years. One ingredient that is missing is salt. You need to add a couple of nice, big pinches in order to counteract the blandness which shortening imparts. Measure flour into your saucepan with the salt, then whisk in the milk, little by little, to banish lumps. After it has been cooked (low heat, whisking constantly) long enough that it starts to boil (this has to be done in order to activate the flour's full thickening power, thereby eliminating an unpleasant "floury" taste) remove from the heat, and press a piece of plastic wrap right onto the surface of your paste. This is the best way to make sure your paste doesn't form a "skin" as the paste cools. The sugar should be added in a very slow, very tiny stream in order to incorporate it sufficiently, then the mixture should be beaten vigorously for 5-10 minutes, depending on the power of your mixer, to eliminate grittiness. Then incorporate your chilled paste. Add your flavoring (I add a dash of lemon and orange extracts to the 2 tsp vanilla for a beautifully complex finish) and beat for another few minutes. Not the heavy texture of your conventional buttercream, but, as others have noted, more of a whipped cream kind of texture. Light, luscious, not too sweet. It's the perfect finish for any cake. Best not to attempt to decorate with it, however, as it's not as sturdy as a conventional decorator buttercream. This is always served to raves.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
27 users found this review helpful

Five Flavor Pound Cake I

Reviewed: Aug. 19, 2011
Yum!! Went heavier on the vanilla, and lighter on the coconut, since we're not huge fans. It was wonderful. Nice dense texture with moist, fine crumb. Works well for torting, as shown in the picture. Excellent.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
8 users found this review helpful

Ginger Bars

Reviewed: Aug. 16, 2011
Lovely, spicy, tasty bites. Since my crew loves their ginger baked goods to have a pleasantly warm afterglow, I added a full tablespoon of ginger and several good shakes of cayenne pepper. Then sprinkled the top with sugar to ensure a crackly crust. These didn't disappoint. I'm perplexed by the reviews that call this recipe "cake-like" because mine were nice and chewy, with a thin, shiny crust that shattered when bitten into. To be fair, I need to note that I used only all purpose flour, as I didn't have any whole wheat. Maybe that made the difference? Another possible explanation I can think of is overbaking. They were devoured in no time flat, and one friend who is a major fan of gingersnaps said he actually prefers these because of their chewy texture - the flavor is virtually the same. These are easy to whip up in no time at all - much quicker than making individual cookies. I always keep molasses on hand, and this is just about as good an excuse as any I've found for continuing to do so. A+
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
23 users found this review helpful

Slammin' Salmon

Reviewed: Aug. 9, 2011
Epic! Add yet one more voice to the Greek chorus praising this recipe. It's easy to tailor this to your taste. We're not people who like things real hot, so in place of the crushed red pepper flakes, I used about 1/4 tsp cayenne. Also didn't have green onions, but I did have one very lovely leek, so I chopped up the light green part. No peanut oil, so I subbed extra virgin olive oil. I also finely grated the zest of one lemon into the marinade. These changes presented no problem. It was INCREDIBLE. In place of salmon, I had some 2" thick marlin fillets. We grilled it over charcoal, and I'm telling you, this was darned near nirvana! Moist, full of smoky, earthy, delectable taste. Salmon is coming next. But be aware that it translates perfectly into other firm-meated fish, such as ahi (fresh tuna,) shark, mahi-mahi, or swordfish. Beg, borrow, or steal the ingredients to make this one. Yes, it IS that good!
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
9 users found this review helpful

Sour Cream Pound Cake

Reviewed: Aug. 7, 2011
This only just misses the coveted 5 star rating by a whisker. It's a solid starting point. However, it loses a half star because 1) it benefits greatly from the addition of flavoring and 2) the instructions are incorrect. No way around it. The temperature is too high, and the timing too long. Had I baked it at the indicated 375 degrees and left it in for 50 minutes (subtract 10 minutes to compensate for the larger pan I used - read on) the result would have been a dark brown outside, and and a dry inside. It should be baked at 350 degrees. Because I don't have the loaf pan size specified, I used a 9"X5" pan, and 45 minutes resulted in a perfectly baked cake. The texture is spot-on for a pound cake, dense, with a moist, velvety crumb. Excellent keeper, presumably because of the sour cream, which imparts a lovely flavor. I used 1 tsp vanilla, and 1/2 tsp each of orange and lemon extracts. This can be tailored to your tastes. 1-2 tsp vanilla will give you a flavorful plain cake, but you can use any combination you'd like, such as almond, coconut, anise, lemon, rum, maple, orange, or a little of all of them. If you like citrus, fold in 1-2 tsp finely grated zest. Infinitely variable. It's fast and easy to throw together in no time at all. Freezes well, but do not store for more than 4 months tops, double-wrapped in plastic for optimum quality. Looks like a Sarah Lee or Entenmann's cake, with a far superior flavor to either. With these minor modifications, stellar!
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
27 users found this review helpful
Photo by Baricat

Chocolate Frosting III

Reviewed: Jul. 29, 2011
Good flavor, but definitely needed work. I wanted it to look shiny, so I added about 3 Tb corn syrup. Thin, as has been pointed out before, so I placed it in a bigger bowl with ice and water, and stirred gently until it firmed up. Do not use a mixer over the ice and water, unless you want the color to lighten up considerably. I was going for a dark, fudgy look, so I just stirred it with a rubber scraper. It will thicken up on the bottom, where the bowl makes contact with the icy water. Not to worry. Just take it out of the ice water and stir until the thicker part has blended in. Then return to the icy water and continue stirring until it reaches your desired consistency. I was using it for my 9-layer vertical torte, so I increased it by 50%. Held its shape very well, and with the addition of the corn syrup, it sported a lovely, appealing sheen.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
4 users found this review helpful

Aunt Johnnie's Pound Cake

Reviewed: Jun. 29, 2011
Hard to imagine how anyone could take exception to this excellent recipe. Super moist, flavorful, with a fine, tender, velvety crumb. It's nice and dense, exactly as a proper pound cake should be. What's not to like?? It's a recipe that can tolerate all manner of changes in flavoring, and turn out consistently like champ. I've made it plain, subbing vanilla for the almond (we don't like in-your-face almond flavor in this house,) and have dressed it up, as well. To do this, I use 1/2 tsp each of coconut, rum, maple, almond, lemon, orange extracts and 1 tsp vanilla. I know this is about double the extract called for in the recipe, but it still works perfectly. I have also used buttermilk in place of the milk in order to use it up, but when I do that, I add 1/4 tsp soda to neutralize the acidity you get from buttermilk. It's perfect to layer with strawberries and cream, or just to enjoy with a cup of tea. I have used it to make a trifle - just wonderful. Any way you choose to make it or serve it, this recipe will do you proud each and every time. Watch the timing scrupulously, and check with a toothpick or skewer in the center to determine doneness. Overbaking will make this dry. A little watchfulness will be rewarded.
Was this review helpful? [ YES ]
9 users found this review helpful

Displaying results 61-80 (of 306) reviews
 
ADVERTISEMENT
Go Pro!

In Season

 Quick & Easy Grilling
Quick & Easy Grilling

Easy weeknight dinners, ready in a flash.

Fresh Summer Meals
Fresh Summer Meals

Enjoy the bright days of summer with easy recipes.

Subscribe Today! Only $7.99
Subscribe Today! Only $7.99

Delicious recipes, party ideas, and helpful cooking tips! Get a year of Allrecipes magazine for just $7.99!

Most Popular Blogs

Read our allrecipes.com blog

Recently Viewed Recipes

You haven't looked at any recipes lately. Get clicking!
Quick Links: Recipe Box | Shopping List | More »
 
Argentina  |  Australia & New Zealand  |  Brazil  |  Canada  |  China  |  France  |  Germany  |  India  |  Italy  |  Japan  |  Korea  |  Mexico

Netherlands  |  Poland  |  Quebec  |  Russia  |  SE Asia  |  United Kingdom & Ireland  |  United States