Pressure Cooker Pot Roast - 4.5 Pounds Of Great Tasting Stuff - Pressure Cooker Cooking Blog at Allrecipes.com - 249705

Pressure Cooker Cooking

Pressure Cooker Pot Roast - 4.5 pounds of great tasting stuff 
 
Sep. 10, 2011 8:36 pm 
Updated: Sep. 14, 2011 3:26 pm
Prior to today, I've cooked pot roast in my pressure cooker (PC) twice. Because I was unsure of myself, I made only 2 pounds of beef each time. Today, I went for broke (at only $14.40), and cooked 4.5 pounds. It turned out beautifully. Here's what I did:
 
For a pot roast base, I used onions and carrots. I love onions in almost everything except dessert, with Vidalia, or onions labeled as "sweet" being the best for imparted flavor (purple onions are also great, but are harsh for gravy). I like carrots in sauces, too, because they impart a good flavor, look pretty, and keep forever in the frig, ready to be used whenever needed. Other veggies could be used in the base, but for this dish, I feel two is company, and three is a crowd.
 
With that in mind, I cut the beef into 2" cubes and browned them in a large, non-stick frying pan (using a splash of peanut oil to get things started). Once browned, I removed the meat from the pan and placed it in the PC.
 
Next, I browned 1.5 very large, chopped onions, and a handful of  chopped "finger carrots" (the type that come cleaned and cut) in the meat drippings that were left in the frying pan.
 
When the onions were lightly brown, I turned off the heat, and poured approximately 3 cups of water into the frying pan, stirring the veggies. Last, I poured this mixture over the meat in the PC.
 
What made me decide on 3 cups of water? My PC's directions suggest 1 cup of water for every 10 minutes of high pressure cooking and I planned on cooking the beef for a half hour.
 
Picture 1: This shows what the meat/veggie/water mixture looked like when first combined. Note that 4.5 pounds of cubed beef is the maximum my 6 quart PC can hold, as its volume reached the pot's mid-point.
 
Picture 2: This is what the pot roast looked like after 30 minutes. You can see that the beef shrunk (all fibrous connections disappeared).
 
Picture 3: This shows the broth that will become gravy after the meat was removed. I started with approximately 3 cups of water and ended with about the same volume of liquid.
 

NOTE:
♥´¨)
¸.·´¸.·*´¨) ¸.·*´¨)
(¸.·´ (¸.·´♥ Many (if not all) PC publications recommend browning meat and veggies in the PC itself, saving clean-up time. That is insane. The bottom of the pot isn't wide enough to brown the maximum number of pieces at one time without having the pieces touch one another, causing steaming. Washing a non-stick frying pan AND a PC is the least of my troubles, especially seeing as I have a dishwasher

Picture 1: Pot roast at the beginning of the PC process.
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Picture 2: Pot roast at the end of the PC process.
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Picture 3: Pot roast broth at the end of the PC process.
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Comments
Sep. 10, 2011 10:59 pm
Great information - your dinner looks great. Thanks!
 
Sep. 10, 2011 11:00 pm
BTW - have you ever tried doing a whole 4 lb chuck roast? I will have to read back through your blogs. Keep them coming, please. :)
 
Sep. 14, 2011 3:26 pm
Now that I'm now feeling more confident, I plan on trying a whole chuck roast before the end of the month. Cookbook author Lorna Sass suggests that the meat does not have to be browned first, so that's something for me to consider.
 
 
 
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Littleviews

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Weehawken, New Jersey, USA

Member Since
Mar. 2011

Cooking Level
Intermediate

Cooking Interests
Middle Eastern, Mediterranean, Vegetarian

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About Me
My name is Karen Little. I'm a travel writer (see www.Littleviews.com) and adult kick scooter evangelist (www.LetsKickScoot.com). My current love is going sightseeing around the USA on my trusty kick scooter and encouraging others to do the same!
My favorite things to cook
I became a vegan (vegetarian) in January 2011, then switched to being a modified vegetarian in August. While I still primarily eat vegetarian meals, I now eat meat a few times a week. That said, I enjoy vegetable and grain-based meals very much. They are great on the tummy as well as the budget.
My favorite family cooking traditions
My mom's favorite dishes included hotdogs, baloney, and undercooked chicken. My mother-in-law's favorite dish was pot roast. As I grew older, my favorite foods were all served in fast-food restaurants. I now live somewhat near "Carlos Bakery" (owned by "The Cake Boss") in Hoboken, NJ. I would regularly buy Bear Claws there, but can't because of all the tourists vying to get in front of me. TIP: If you can actually get in Carlos Bakery, make sure you leave with a box full of fresh Bear Claws.
My cooking triumphs
I am currently excited about using a pressure cooker.
My cooking tragedies
Happily, I don't have any tragedies, but you never know what Anthony Bourdain would say about my culinary skills. Then again, considering the types of things he eats from street vendors, maybe he'd be really pleased.
 
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