High Altitude Baking - Brownie Recipe - Jessie's Wedding Blog at Allrecipes.com - 304155

Jessie's Wedding

High Altitude Baking - Brownie Recipe 
 
Jun. 8, 2013 2:58 pm 
Updated: Jun. 15, 2013 8:29 am

High Altitude Cooking and Baking

 

Hi my name is Cammy and I live in Rio Rancho, NM which is a suburb of Albuquerque.  I would like to make the following disclaimers:  1) I am not a home economist and 2) I do not work with anyone or anything that has something to do with high altitude cooking and baking.  To put it plainly, I like to bake.

 

I am a former Military Club Manager who has experience in cooking and baking for a crowd and had some formal training in this area.  I was of the opinion that there was not anything that I could not bake, and have it come out looking great, until I moved to New Mexico. 

 

I was also known at my Catholic Church in my hometown of Decatur, IL as ‘Sister Mary Cookie Baker’, as I use to make cookies for the priest.  I have been baking cookies, muffins, cakes, pies and bread of all kinds since I was tall enough to see over the kitchen counter.

 

My first flirt with high altitude baking occurred when I was stationed in Alamogordo, NM which is at 4300 feet in elevation.  Here in Rio Rancho, NM is the elevation is approximately 5,600 feet above sea level which is more than a mile high.  My children were in their early teens and not baking was not an option.  But when I started baking here in NM cookies came out flat, my cakes collapsed, and quick breads and muffins failed to rise.  What gives?  I learned it was the altitude.  Everything, for the most part, tasted just fine, they just looked like hell.

 

Here are some of my problems with baking at a higher altitude.  Using tried and true recipes, which worked great at a lower altitude, such as cookies came out of the oven flat.  If I made cookies with chocolate chips, the chips were the highest thing in the cookie.  Sugar cookies cut into specific shapes, like for Christmas, came out looking like unrecognizable blobs.  My brownies were a compacted mess of usually undercooked batter.  I had to learn what I was doing wrong.

 

Throughout the last few years, I have been working on my baking, and cooking as it pertained to the higher elevation.  In the process I have started accumulating “high altitude” recipes that have worked for me at 5,000 – 7,000 feet.

 

There are two things that I have found will affect your baking.  The first thing is leaveners like baking soda and baking powder.  I found that using the amount of leaveners called for in the recipe calls for will have an adverse fact on your baking.  This was what was causing the pancake cookies.  I had to start using less of the baking powder and soda.  Other things that will cause your baked goods to just not come out correctly include sugar, liquids and flour.   Tweaking was required…so I started playing with the recipes.

 

I have attached the web site that I use the most for adjusting for higher altitudes.  I like this site as it tells you not only what to do, but also tells you WHY you need to make these adjustments

 

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipe/high-altitude-baking.html<

 

You should know that just because the web site says you should do this and that for each recipe in the way of adjustments, sometimes you only need to make a few changes to make them work.  I like to play with a recipe by making two adjustments first and then tweaking as I go if I do not like the outcome.  A case in point is my brownie recipe.

 

This was my first recipe that I adjusted for high altitude and that is the “One Bowl Brownies” from Baker’s Chocolate.  This recipe has no leavening, and while I originally made the recipe to exact specifications, it never came out correctly.  It was a mess of compacted chocolate that looked like it was not baked enough, even though the crumb test showed it was done. 

 

Below is the High Altitude recipe for these brownies.  I have shown in bold print those areas where I changed the recipe.  After the adjusted recipe, is the original recipe so you can see where I made my adjustments.  In the recipe below, I raised the temperature in my oven, reduced the sugar, increased the flour and decreased the cooking time.  

ONE BOWL BAKER’s BROWNIES – HA

 

1pkg. (4 oz.) BAKER'S Unsweetened Chocolate

3/4cup butter or margarine

2 cups sugar less 2 Tablespoons  (Note: I put all of my sugar in a small bowl and then remove the excess sugar.

3 eggs

1 tsp. vanilla

1 ¼ cup flour

1 Cup chopped pecans or walnuts * (See note below)

 

1.  HEAT oven to 365°F.

2.  LINE 13x9-inch pan with foil, with ends of foil extending over sides. Spray foil with cooking spray.

3.  MICROWAVE chocolate and butter in large microwaveable bowl on HIGH 2 min. or until butter is melted. Stir until chocolate is completely melted. If the chocolate does not melt, microwave for another 10-15 seconds.

4.  Stir in sugar. Blend in eggs and vanilla. Add flour and nuts (or other ingredients); mix well. Pour into prepared pan.

5.  BAKE 25 to 30 min, or until toothpick inserted in center comes out with fudgy crumbs. (Do not overbake.) Cool completely. Use foil handles to remove brownies from pan before cutting to serve.

 

Cammy Note:  You can substitute anything for the nuts.  I have used coconut, and assorted flavors of chips and dried fruit.  Just remember not to go over 1 cup total.

 

Here are some of my additions:  ½ cup dark dried cherries and ½ cup dark or semi sweet chocolate; ½ cup white chocolate chips and ½ cup of dried apricots; or ½ cup of your choice of nuts and ½ cup of chips or just one cup of chips.  You can also do a brownie where you add in marshmallows, nuts and chips for a Rocky Road brownie.  As you can see I really like to go nuts on this one!!

 

ORIGINAL ONE BOWL BROWNIE RECIPE:

Ingredients

·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; < 1pkg. (4 oz.) BAKER'S Unsweetened Chocolate

·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; < 3/4cup butter or margarine

·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; < 2 cups sugar

·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; < 3 eggs

·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; < 1 tsp. vanilla

·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; < 1 cup flour

·&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; < 1 cup coarsely chopped PLANTERS Pecans

 

Directions

1.  HEAT oven to 350°F.

2.  LINE 13x9-inch pan with foil, with ends of foil extending over sides. Spray foil with cooking spray.

3.  MICROWAVE chocolate and butter in large microwaveable bowl on HIGH 2 min. or until butter is melted. Stir until chocolate is completely melted. Stir in sugar. Blend in eggs and vanilla. Add flour and nuts; mix well. Pour into prepared pan.

4.  BAKE 30 to 35 min. or until toothpick inserted in center comes out with fudgy crumbs. (Do not overbake.) Cool completely. Use foil handles to remove brownies from pan before cutting to serve.

 

Give this brownie recipe a shot.  I am sure you will like the difference in the brownies.   Note that I put HA for High Altitude after I revise a recipe.  That way I can keep them separate from the original recipe that is causing me problems.

 

Enjoy!!

 

See you next week. 


 
Comments
Jun. 9, 2013 7:32 am
Hi Cammy. Nice to see you around. BTW you had me at BROWNIES :)
 
Jun. 9, 2013 2:26 pm
Yeah, you had me at BROWNIES too :) Having never had to cook with altitude in mind, I find your blog very interesting! thanks for sharing your tips.
 
Jun. 9, 2013 4:17 pm
I don't eat sweets or chocolate much, but I do like fudge brownies, with about 16 ounces of walnuts. I actually made some two weeks ago and ate maybe 4 of them, and then took the rest into work and gave them out to the guys I work with.
 
Lela 
Jun. 10, 2013 5:05 am
Hi Cammy, Thanks for sharing your take on the One Bowl Brownie. I live at high altitude, too. The HA Brownie sounds so wonderful. Is there anyway that you can provide a link to your recipe in your blog?
 
Jun. 10, 2013 1:46 pm
Lela, thanks for posting. Is there anything in particular, recipe wise, that you would like me to show/discuss? Here is the brownie URL. I thank you for asking for it and will include in future posts. &#10;&#10;http://allrecipes.com/personalrecipe/63653565/bakers-one-bowl-brownies---ha/detail.aspx
 
Lela 
Jun. 11, 2013 7:20 pm
Cammy, I would love to see different cakes or cupcakes. It seems that I don't make many cakes or cupcakes from scratch. because the cakes just don't turn out. Thanks for the recipe.
 
Jun. 15, 2013 7:05 am
Thanks so much for your efforts. I live in the Denver area so we have to make similar changes to many baking recipes. Its nice to have some tried-and-true recipes. Send MORE!
 
Jun. 15, 2013 8:29 am
Hi, Cammy! You had me at "high altitude" - I'm in El Paso (3800'). Thanks for doing the experimenting for all of us! I will be trying these brownies, but would like to know if you've tried breads (my true passion) - especially in the bread machine. It's so hot, I hate to use my oven, which is why I got the machine, but very few loaves come out right. I will try to adapt any recipe you have for bread to the machine, if you bake manually. I've tried reducing the yeast, upping the liquid, etc. to no avail - they rise and then fall...any advice will be greatly appreciated! I'll be following you from now on - again, THANKS for your hard work! Sandi
 
 
 
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Cammy K

Home Town
Decatur, Illinois, USA
Living In
Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

Member Since
Sep. 2009

Cooking Level
Expert

Cooking Interests
Baking, Stir Frying, Asian, Mexican, Italian, Southern, Low Carb, Vegetarian, Dessert, Quick & Easy, Gourmet

Hobbies
Knitting, Needlepoint, Gardening, Hiking/Camping, Walking, Photography, Reading Books, Painting/Drawing, Charity Work

Links
 
 
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About Me
I am a semi-retired regulatory bank compliance auditor. I own my own auditing company. I retired from the FDIC as an examiner in 2007. I did this so I would not have to travel too much since it is hard to cook in a hotel room. I am involved with a wonderful man and he helps me in the kitchen. He does not mind doing the dishes!! Whatta man!!
My favorite things to cook
I love to bake. You name the baked good and for the most part I have made it sometime in my life. I like making pies, cookies, cakes and quick breads. I also dabble at bread even though my significant other does not like bread that much. Since I am diabetic, I hardly ever eat what I make, but I have a very willing taster in the house.
My favorite family cooking traditions
Thanksgiving and Christmas are my two favorite things to work on. Somewhere between planning the Thanksgiving meal to the last touches on Christmas candy and cookies I love that part of the season. Thanksgiving was always a wonderful holiday when I was growing up as well as Christmas. These were times when my Mom made a big "to-Do" over the holidays. I was always her sous chef at these times.
My cooking triumphs
I would say my biggest triumph was when I was selling my Jumbo Chocolate Chip cookies to two delis here in Albuquerque. At one time I was making 300+ cookies each weekend in my house and taking them to the deli's. Because I was traveling just about every week, I got to the point that the cookies were taking up all of my time on the weekends so I stopped. Now my triumph is making the ten different types of candy and six different types of cookies that I send out as gifts to family, friends, and clients.
My cooking tragedies
I have a plethora of tragedies. The worst ones that I can remember was when I made a quick bread and did not put any sugar in it. It was gross. My worst cooking incident occurred as a new cook when I left the giblets and neck in the turkey and the turkey caught on fire. Needless to say, we have peanut butter and jelly sandwiches that night as the turkey, while smoked :-) was no longer edible.
 
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