Products To Make From Reconstituted Instant Non-Fat Milk. - The Cat's Meow Blog at Allrecipes.com - 238111

The Cat's Meow

Products to make from reconstituted instant non-fat milk. 
 
May 31, 2011 6:50 pm 
Updated: Jun. 9, 2011 7:15 am
I was searchig for the Carnation recipe for using powdered milk to make a whipped topping and stumbled upon this. I read through it and then discovered it is from "The Hillbilly Housewife" web site. It has a lot of great ideas for stretching the food budget. Enjoy.
 
Products to Make with Powdered Milk

Sweet Vanilla Milk:
Run a little hot water into a 2-quart pitcher. Add 1/4-cup each powdered coffee creamer and sugar. Stir well to dissolve. Add 1/2-teaspoon vanilla. Fill the pitcher half full with cold tap water. Add 2-2/3 cups of instant nonfat dry milk powder. Stir well. Fill the pitcher the rest of the way full. Stir again. Chill and serve.

 This milk is more palatable to some folks than straight reconstituted milk. The powdered coffee creamer gives the milk a rich fullness, while the sugar and vanilla make it taste sweet and almost dessert-like. If you must switch to powdered milk, and are having trouble with the flavor, this recipe can make the transition easier.

For a gallon of milk use: 1/2-cup each powdered coffee cream & sugar and 1-teaspoon of vanilla flavoring. Add a dash of salt too if desired. Be sure to dissolve the creamer and sugar in hot tap water first. They do not dissolve readily in cold water.

A Very Rich Gallon of Milk:
 Measure 3-1/2 quarts (14 cups) of water into a gallon size pitcher. Add 5-cups of dry milk powder and a 12-ounce can of undiluted evaporated whole milk. Mix all together. Chill and serve.

This makes about a gallon. It is richer than plain reconstituted milk. If you must use powdered milk, but prefer a richer product, this is the recipe for you. Children will sometimes tolerate it better than straight reconstituted milk, especially if they are already used to fresh 1% or 2%.

To Mix with Whole Milk:
Powdered milk is easily mixed half-and-half with whole milk. When combined and well chilled, it’s nearly impossible to tell the difference between fresh milk and mixed milk. To do this, use an extra, clean milk jug and two 2-quart sized pitchers. First, reconstitute 2 quarts of milk in each of the pitchers, Then, using a funnel, pour half of the whole milk into the clean empty milk jug. Using the same funnel, pour the reconstituted milk from one pitcher into each jug, making a gallon of mixed milk in each jug.

Both empty pitchers then have to be washed, but they are pretty easy to keep clean. I used to try to reconstitute the powdered milk in the milk jug, with the whole milk, but it never worked as well as I’d hoped. Now I find it much easier to reconstitute the powdered milk in the pitcher first, and then pour the liquid milk into the jug with the whole milk. Like regular powdered milk, mixed milk tastes best if well chilled.

Sour Milk:
To sour reconstituted milk, just add a little vinegar to it and stir it up. For instance, if a recipe calls for 1-cup of sour milk or buttermilk, then measure a tablespoon of vinegar into a measuring cup. Add reconstituted milk to reach the 1-cup mark. Stir the milk gently. In a moment or two, it will sour. This can replace soured milk or buttermilk in baking recipes.

Overnight Buttermilk:
 To make your own buttermilk, you have to start off with 1/2-cup of fresh, store-bought buttermilk and a quart (4-cups) of reconstituted milk. Combine the fresh buttermilk and reconstituted milk in a pitcher or jar. Mix it really well. Allow it to stand at room temperature overnight, or for about 8 hours. The milk will have thickened up and cultured into regular buttermilk. Refrigerate or chill and use anywhere fresh buttermilk is called for.

Easy Evaporated Milk:
To make this you only need dry milk powder and water. Measure 1-1/3 cups water into a jar or bowl. Add 1 cup of instant dry milk powder. Stir or shake to combine. This is the equivalent of a 12-ounce can of evaporated skim milk. To make evaporated whole milk, you will need to add some fat to replace the milk fat in whole milk. Do this by preparing evaporated skim milk and then adding 2-tablespoons of vegetable oil to the milk. Stir it up vigorously to emulsify the fat with the milk. It will separate on standing, so mix it really well right before using it. This is best used in cooking and baking. A spritz of nonstick spray will help the emulsification process.

Sweetened Condensed Milk:
On the stove, bring to a boil 1/2-cup of water, 1-cup of sugar and 3-tablespoons of margarine or shortening. Add a dash of salt. Stir the mixture every now and then. When it comes to a full rolling boil, remove it from the heat. Allow it to cool slightly. Add a cup of instant dry milk powder. Use a whisk to stir it smooth. A fork or a spoon will not work out all the lumps. You really need a whisk, or egg beaters. There, you are done. This is the equivalent of a can of sweetened condensed milk. This will keep unrefrigerated for a day or two because of the sugar. I have never kept it longer than that without refrigeration. In the fridge it will keep for 2 weeks. For longer storage than that, I freeze it.
Quick Whipped Topping:
 This recipe is best made if you have electricity. Put 1/2-cup of water into a large bowl and place it in your freezer. Whenice crystals form around the edges remove it from the freezer. Add 1/2-cup instant dry milk powder. Whip the mixture with electric beaters until it is light and fluffy. This will take a couple of minutes. Add 2-tablespoons sugar, 1-teaspoon of lemon juice, and 1/2-teaspoon of vanilla. Beat until thick enough to spoon like whipped topping. Use immediately.
 
Molasses Milk:
High in iron, with a caramel-toffee flavor this hot beverage is quite delicious. Heat 3/4-cup of reconstituted milk in a cup in the microwave. Stir in a spoonful of molasses. Serve hot. My kids love this stuff.
 
Chocolate Milk:
 Fill a cup with reconstituted milk. Squeeze in a couple spoonfuls of homemade Chocolate Syrup. Stir to combine. Serve to thirsty children who object to plain reconstituted powdered milk. Cold chocolate milk can be heated in the microwave for hot chocolate. This is also great in lunch boxes. If you want to be really nice to the kids then make up a whole gallon of reconstituted chocolate milk at a time. They will brag to their friends and your reputation will become legendary.

Homemade Yogurt:
Reconstitute a quart of milk in a very clean container like a wide mouthed canning jar. Add another 1/2-cup of milk powder for body. Whisk in 1/4-cup of commercial yogurt with active cultures. Read the label to be sure the yogurt has active cultures. Stash the milk in a warm spot, between 80° and 110°. Allow it to sit undisturbed for 6 to 8 hours. It should be thick and creamy, like commercially available yogurt. Chill your yogurt and use anywhere you would regular yogurt. It makes a great substitute for sour cream. Or mix it half and half with prepared mayonnaise for your own homemade low-fat mayo.

Yogurt Cheese:
 Line a colander with a clean, damp piece of cloth. Pour prepared yogurt into the cloth. Allow the yogurt to drain overnight. In the morning the remaining solids will be yogurt cheese. They can be used anywhere you would use cream cheese or thick sour cream.

Curds & Whey:
In a large pot combine 6-cups of fresh water and 3-cups of dry milk powder. Stir to dissolve. Heat the milk over a medium flame until it is very warm, about 120°. This is hot to the touch, but not scalding. Stir in 1/2-cup of plain white vinegar. Allow to stand for 10 minutes. There should be a large mass of curds in an amber pool of whey. If the liquid is still milky, add another 1/4-cup of vinegar. Stir and stand again for 10 minutes. Line a strainer with a clean cloth and drain off the whey. It can be used as the liquid in bread or muffins or biscuits. Rinse the curds under cool water and store in the fridge. This recipe makes about 1-1/2 to 2-cups of curds.
 
Ricotta or Cottage Cheese:
The dry cheese curds from the above recipe will work for ricotta cheese in most recipes. To turn it into cottage cheese add a little evaporated milk or yogurt to “cream” it and stir to combine. You can divide the mixture in half and make some of each if you want to give them both a try.
 
Comments
Jun. 1, 2011 2:23 pm
Once in a while (like I'm desperate) I'll mix 1/2 whole milk with an equal amt of non-fat dry (mixed up, of course!) I can't tell the diff. but I've been told otherwise (yeah, right!) by the boss! (I have to be "caught in the act!") Anyway, I've done this for years, at times... Somewhere I've got a rec. for "whipped topping..." but haven't tried it. Did you find a website? (I skimmed your blog... sorry!) Sometimes I just say that it had been in the freezer a while (if I hear - this doesn't taste right!) Ooohhh I can be bad!! Thanks for the tips!
 
Jun. 1, 2011 8:46 pm
Great info to have on hand Kitten! Thanks for posting this....Ginny
 
Jun. 1, 2011 9:20 pm
Thanks yet again for helpful information :O) Great JOB Girl
 
Kitten 
Jun. 1, 2011 9:49 pm
Thank you guys, I was just so totally surprised when I saw everything powdered milk could do. Hi Stevie, I have made the powdered milk whipped topping and it is just like Cool Whip or Dream Whip I'll see if I can find mine and post it here for you.
 
Kitten 
Jun. 1, 2011 9:56 pm
Whipped Topping Substitute~~ This tried-and-true recipe results in a fluffy topping that isn't loaded with fat;...1/3 cup Carnation Instant Nonfat Dry Milk;...1/3 cup ice cold water;...1/4 cup granulated sugar;...1 teaspoon lemon juice;...1 teaspoon vanilla extract;...Directions;...Chill bowl and beaters of electric mixer in freezer for 15 minutes;...In chilled mixing bowl, combine powdered milk, ice water, sugar, lemon juice and vanilla extract;... Beat on high speed until peaks form;...4 Servings
 
Jun. 1, 2011 10:01 pm
Its good in a smoothie too, makes it "frothy". I also put powdered milk in my breakfast bars - I just sprinkle it in with the wet ingredients :) LOve all your info and tips Kitten.
 
Mamaw1 
Jun. 2, 2011 1:08 pm
Thanks for sharing. I just copied your good information, and the comments of others. Years ago, powdered milk was less expensive than regular. (My SIL served it during "dad's in college" years.) It's good to have your info. avail. when no fresh milk is avail., or to add extra nutrition.
 
Wendie 
Jun. 9, 2011 7:15 am
Wow Kitten, just stumbled by; better late than never. Thank you, thank you! I love having on hand plenty of sub options.
 
 
 
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Kitten

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About Me
Well, I'm a Boise, Idaho transplanted native originally from California. I grew up in San Jose until the 4th grade then the folks mover to the Turlock/Delhi area; about 80 miles south os Sacramento. I definitely believe there is still a lot of Californai Girl in me, but I do love Idaho. I am the mother of 2 and grandmother of 3. I like to read, Oh, especially old English Poetry. Lordy, I just melt when I read one of Shakespeare's sonnets or John Donne's poetry and Lord Byron. I enjoy sewing, crocheting, and quilting. I think life is taken way too seriously; sure there are serious things in life, but you still need to laugh. I also wish the world could just be one big "Brady Bunch". I am a hopeless optimist and figure things could be worse. And, I think everyday has the ability to be a good day. If you woke up alive and everyone you care about woke up alive then, it's a good day. Geeze, even a broken clock is right twice.
My favorite things to cook
I enjoy cooking challenging things. Not the every day stuff that you can do blindfolded. And I love to make my dishes look good. I'm not sure I have favorites. During the winter I like to make what I call one pan dinners. Stews, soups and things in large bubbly pans.
My favorite family cooking traditions
My family doesn't have any long standing traditions but my husbands family does and I have, with the help of my sainted mother-in-law and sweetheart husband, learned to cook some of them. When his family gets together for the holidays, I love to help my sisters-in-law make the dinner. They are all German Mennonite and I love their traditions. They make dished for the holidays that they made before they came to America. That's cool.
My cooking triumphs
Having my mother-in-law ask me to bring a family favorite to a large family Christmas gathering when everyone else was raised in a German Mennonite commuinty and grew up with the food and I didn't.
My cooking tragedies
Somehow, I always seem to set fire to something during the holidays. It's usually the sweet potatoes either before they go into the oven or the marshmellows when I am going to toast them.
 
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