m0wlp42 Recipe Reviews (Pg. 1) - Allrecipes.com (10941968)

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Potato Plum Dumplings

Reviewed: Sep. 8, 2011
In Austria you can now buy these in the frozen food section, but homemade is always best. I've made some very time consuming dishes, but this one tops the list both in terms of work and clean-up. The results, however, are well worth it because it brings back so many memories of our time in Austria. Some suggestions/changes: 1) Regular plums will not suffice for the Italian prune plums. If you can't find them, use apricots and make marillenknödel (i.e. apricot dumplings.) Because apricots are larger, just put half of an apricot into each dumpling so that it will cook properly. 2) I peel the potatoes first and cut into quarters to speed up the boiling time. 3) You need a potato ricer. If you just mash the potatoes, the consistency will not be correct. You can buy one for under $10 at places like Bed, Bath & Beyond. 4) Regular, plain breadcrumbs. Not seasoned. Not panko. 5) The recipe is sweet - kids love it - so we're not a big fan of the sugar cube in the middle. Instead, sprinkle a little powdered sugar for the garnish. 6) Regarding farina, it is a wheat "cereal," so look for it in the oatmeal section and not the baking aisle with the flour. Some regular grocery stores carry it, but a natural food store is a better bet. You can buy a box at Trader Joe's for $2.99 (although, the big question is what to cook with the rest!) This is a truly authentic recipe that turns out just as good as the original in Austria. Thank you!
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5 users found this review helpful

The Rebbetzin Chef's Persian Walnut Cookies

Reviewed: Jul. 20, 2010
I've made this recipe on several occasions. When the cookies turn out well, they are scrumptious and are easily gone in two days. We refer to them as walnut lace cookies because they are light, have a little crunch, and are flavorful. But, as other reviewers have mentioned, I've have had my share of problems with this recipe. Three egg yolks usually aren't enough to make the batter stick (it hardly clumps together!) So, I either add another egg yolk (making 4 in total) or 2 egg yolks and one whole egg. I also have major issues with the term "finely ground walnuts." One time, I pulsed whole walnuts in a food processor to create finely ground nuts; I ended up with one, big, runny cookie. Another time, I lightly pounded whole walnuts in a plastic bag with a skillet; the end result was a slightly less runny cookie. So, I now used chopped walnut pieces. My cookies aren't as smooth as the ones shown in the photograph, but at least they are individual cookies. Also, I think using a silpat pad works better than the parchment paper. As the recipe suggests, do leave space between cookies because they spread and 20 minutes is indeed sufficient cooking time.
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12 users found this review helpful

Orange-Curried Turkey Roulade with Goat Cheese & Spinach

Reviewed: Jul. 20, 2010
What, no reviews? Yet again, people are missing out on some of the best recipes on this website. A delicious and relatively easy recipe that can be made for the family or dressed up for a dinner party. Few notes: 1) Because I make this dish for 4 or more people, create an assembly line - 1 plate for the curry, one plate for spinach/twine, etc. The process goes much faster. 2) Drizzle freshly squeezed lemon juice atop each roulade prior to serving. It adds a little extra flavor. 3) Increase the amount of curry and marmalade used. Also, while the turkey is cooking, I just make a simple side salad topped with roasted fennel and cumin seeds (a tip I learned from another recipe on this site) that really compliments the flavor of the turkey. The only downside to this recipe is that it is pricey - turkey cutlets cost more than chicken breasts in our area and the goat cheese is $3.50. But try it nevertheless. I always get rave reviews when I make it.
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4 users found this review helpful

Shirazi Salad

Reviewed: Jul. 20, 2010
Close, but not entirely authentic. Add parsley (about 1/2 cup finely chopped) and mint. Ironically dried mint (labeled as mint flakes in traditional grocery stores) works best - 1 or 2 tbsp. Also, for clarification, red onion not white onion. While lemon juice is typically used in this dish in northern Iran, try it southern style with lime juice instead. It adds a little more zing. We usually use at least one (if not two) freshly squeezed lemon/lime; 1 tbsp is too little. Finally, let the salad refrigerate for at least 30 minutes to blend the flavors. This salad makes a great accompaniment to Middle Eastern dishes such as kabob, kofta, falafel, donair, etc, but also try it with steak or carne asada. Yum.
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44 users found this review helpful

Anise Fruit Bowl

Reviewed: Jul. 7, 2009
One summer day my family and I went fruit picking, came home with a bevy of fresh fruit and had no idea what to do with it all. Luckily, we stumbled upon this recipe. The fruit salad makes a great light breakfast, dessert or snack. We, however, have found alternative uses for this medley. We store the syrup and fruit separately, so it will last longer. For breakfast, we use the recipe to make yogurt parfaits (layer vanilla yogurt, fruit and granola in a glass; drizzle with the syrup and – if desired - honey.) Or, with the current frozen yogurt craze, we just buy frozen yogurt, top with the fruit/syrup, jimmies, etc., (Sorbet is a good alternative; ice cream doesn’t work well.) And some members of my family also like the anise syrup as a salad dressing for vegetable/fruit salads (i.e. the spinach/strawberry/toasted almond salad combo). As others have mentioned, fresh fruit works best. We prefer berries, but anise is also a good complement to kiwis and, in the wintertime, clementines.
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5 users found this review helpful

Vietnamese Aromatic Lamb Chops

Reviewed: Jun. 23, 2009
I was leery of using loin chops because I’ve had iffy results with this meat cut, but the lamb turned out very tender and flavorful. Marinating overnight is best, but I’ve also had good results with five hours. We serve it with a robust salad, but if you’re really hungry you’ll want another side. It’s also a great dish for company. I would just note, however, that the cilantro and lime are what really make this recipe Vietnamese. Leaving off those items gives you a great piece of lamb; changing the toppings could easily adapt the dish to another cuisine.
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26 users found this review helpful

Meatballs with Raisins and Honey

Reviewed: Jun. 18, 2009
Initially, I got the “Huh?” look from my family when I mentioned this recipe, but once the meatballs were on the table, they were eaten with gusto. Having made this recipe several times now, I've made a few adjustments: 1) Grate one onion and use this in the meat. It's easier to form the meatballs 2) use 2-3 pieces of soggy bread that are either torn or sliced. One piece wasn't enough to hold together all the meat 3) add more raisins (but, that's a taste preference) 4) add more Middle Eastern spices. We add a pinch of cardamom, some allspice and lots of cumin. The additional spices and raisins help increase the sweet to savory ratio. Finally, about those onions. Yes, they do produce water and create a liquid for the meatballs to simmer in. And with the additional spices, they are quite tasty. But 5 were just too much. Because we eat the meatballs as is (rather than served with pasta or rice), the onions overwhelmed the meat. I've since cut down on the number of onions used and add water instead before simmering. Overall, great recipe. Thanks.
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3 users found this review helpful

Pomegranate Dessert

Reviewed: Dec. 21, 2008
Simple, delicious and refreshing. My only concern is labeling this recipe a dessert. Many Mideast cultures eat fruit for dessert (I assume that region is the inspiration for this dish) and I certainly enjoy it as one, but for those with a major sweet tooth, they might find the recipe unsatisfying as is. If I were presenting this to guests I would either a)serve it as an appetizer instead (it's light and really cleans the palate) or b) serve it as a dessert with a twist. I love it atop rich, dark chocolate ice cream, but it can also be good on gourmet ice cream flavors like cardamon or rose. Next time, though, I plan to utilize it as a pomegranate shortcake - i.e. spoon some of the pomegranate into a glass, add a small slice of pound cake, top with whip cream and a drizzle of honey. Can't wait! Oh, two tips: 1) Remove pomegranate seeds over the sink. It's a messy procedure and the juice easily stains. 2) I've only been able to find rosewater in Persian/Arab stores (it comes in a bottle.) You really need it for this dish, so make the effort to find and buy it. Thanks for the wonderful recipe!
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45 users found this review helpful

Peruvian Lomo Saltado

Reviewed: Sep. 23, 2008
I first encountered Lomo Saltado in a small Latin restaurant in my area, where it quickly became a favorite. Unfortunately, the restaurant took this dish off the menu, so I was very pleased to discover it on this site and re-create it at home. As is, I think this recipe is OK. If you’re willing to invest a bit more time, however, it is a wonderful dish. 1) I’ve eaten meat and chicken versions of this recipe. I find the chicken to be better. 2) Do marinade the meat in the vinegar and soy sauce for at least an hour, if not several hours. The added tanginess is nice. 3) Ditch the frozen fries (does anyone really like Ore Ida?) and make your own. I agree, crispy, crunchy shoestring fries are best with this meal. I also season the fries with added pepper and paprika. 4) To serve, either place meat with some of the marinade on top of a “bed” of fries, or separate fries from the meat - but keep on the same plate! - so guests/family members can pick from both piles. This is good. I hope others try it despite the unusual name.
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21 users found this review helpful

Cherry Chocolate Cookies

Reviewed: Sep. 21, 2008
Another classic example of a great recipe on this website that more people really ought to try. Adding sour cream to the cookie batter is a interesting twist, but it works well. The cookie comes out from the oven crispy on the edges, soft & chewy in the middle and there is that crunch from the nuts within. My family really likes the play of chocolate & fruit, so this cookie has quickly become a favorite. I made this recipe as instructed the first time. It's certainly good as is, but I've made a few adjustments to suit our tastes. 1) We like cookies with a lotta stuff, so I add a full cup of both cherries & chocolate chips. 2) I think fruit goes better with dark chocolate, so I use chips with a higher coca content (e.g. Ghirardelli)rather than semisweet. 3) I cut down the sugar to 1/2 cup instead of the 3/4 listed. 4) Almonds work great, but experiment with other nuts as well. Next time I intend to try hazelnuts. Admittedly, dried cherries aren't cheap (from the grocery chains, Trader Joe's price is the most reasonable), but they really make this recipe and any leftovers make a great snack too.
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7 users found this review helpful

Pico De Gallo

Reviewed: Jul. 21, 2008
Almost, but not quite. Use more cilantro, garlic cloves rather than powder and fresh lime juice (squeezed from 1 lime). Also, the white onion is too strong for this dish; add more green onion instead. Pico de gallo, however, is based on taste preference, so adjust amounts to your specifications.
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3 users found this review helpful

Fish Tacos with Honey-Cumin Cilantro Slaw and Chipotle Mayo

Reviewed: Jul. 21, 2008
Between the tilapia, panko, and slaw, this isn’t the cheapest of dinners, but it is money well spent (and far tastier than the greasy glop some places serve as fish tacos.) We really like this meal and it has quickly become a family favorite, but a few notes. 1) I’ve searched many food stores and can’t find the chipotle peppers in adobo sauce. I use pico de gallo instead and while it is a decent substitute, I can see why the chipotle mayonnaise really is that element that brings this dish together. 2) Because panko are lighter and fluffier than Italian breadcrumbs, you must use the recommended amount of oil (if not more). If you skimp on the oil, you’ll run the risk of blackened breadcrumbs and the fish won’t be cooked thoroughly. 3) That being said, I also think smaller chunks work better than larger pieces. It means more time flouring, dipping, etc, but then you’ll get fully cooked, evenly browned fish when frying (and you’ll be able to cram more fish pieces into your tortillas!) 4) I think broccoli slaw, rather than coleslaw, is a better match for this meal. Admittedly, more expensive and I don’t know how well it will absorb the chipotle mayo, but we really like the extra crunch it provides. Overall, this meal has everything we’re looking for – it’s a healthier alternative to other meal options, but still possesses a lot of flavor and taste. Thanks for the great recipe!
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2 users found this review helpful

Kashmiri-Style Kidney Beans with Turnips

Reviewed: Jul. 5, 2008
A very tasty, flavorful recipe. I love the addition of the cumin and fennel seeds (yes, they are pricey, but they are a must in the dish. Ground cumin will not work. And, you'll probably find yourself adding the seeds into other dishes. They create a nice zip to salads.) I usually add 1/2 lb of ground beef to make it a heartier meal especially during the cold winter months or if I am too lazy to make rice, but the vegetarian version is also nice. I think turnips are an underused vegetable and this recipe uses them to maximum advantage. I like how the turnips start to absorb the tomato mixture flavor. My only problem is that I usually have some water leftover in the pot. The liquid doesn't create a real sauce, so I usually drain the mixture before serving. Overall, great dish. It won't appeal to all taste buds, but we certainly enjoy it.
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30 users found this review helpful

Babi's Bean Salad

Reviewed: Jun. 29, 2008
Beans and vegetables have never been so addictive. I first made this recipe at midday so that the marinade would really seep into the vegetables. By dinnertime, my family had finished it already. We all really enjoy the flavor combination of this salad. It's something different - i.e. refreshing - to take along to a summer barbecue and it is a side dish that works well with both beef and some fish meals. Like another reviewer, I do use canned beans (just make sure to drain and rinse well), so the hardest part is prepping the vegetables. There is only one tiny issue - I still think the dressing is missing an ingredient, but I'm not sure what exactly. Perhaps some lime juice to add a bit more zing (FYI: If you have lemon balm growing in your herb garden, use it) or another spice in addition to the coriander? If I discover it, I will post accordingly. In the meanwhile, try this recipe; it's wonderful.
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7 users found this review helpful

Lebanese Donair

Reviewed: Jun. 26, 2008
Although there is a rustic simplicity to Dash’s Donair recipe on this website, this version of donair is much more satisfying, so I’m surprised more people haven’t tried/reviewed it. The marinade adds a lot of body and flavor, making the beef especially tasty. I only make a few minor changes: 1) Surprisingly, I think whole wheat pita complements the dish better 2) I serve with lettuce, tomatoes and onions so family members can make their own sandwiches and 3) for the sauces, although I like hummus, I think it takes away from the flavor of the meat in this dish. I also remove the tomatoes from the parsley sauce because I serve with fresh tomatoes. This makes the parsley sauce stronger, but nestled among the meat and veggies, it doesn’t overwhelm. (As a side note, I usually have a lot of the parsley sauce left. Instead of throwing it away, I recycle it into another dish. I cut large tomatoes in half – the hothouse/jersey variety – spread the tops of the tomatoes with a large spoonful of the parsley sauce and bake/broil in the toaster oven for 30 minutes. It makes for an interesting twist on the tomato/pesto side dish that goes well with a lot of meat/chicken meals.) I enjoy this recipe for lunch or as a light dinner, but it is particularly in demand with the menfolk during football season.
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22 users found this review helpful

Salmon with Pineapple Tomato Salsa

Reviewed: Jun. 2, 2008
Refreshing and delicious would be the best description for this dish. It is a perfect summer meal not only because it takes advantage of ingredients at their peak, but when it is hot and humid, the last place one wants to be is cooking over a hot stove. Just a few suggestions/minor changes: 1) DON’T cook the salsa with the fish. The coolness of the salsa makes a nice compliment to the warm fish. 2) Do make more of the salsa. It’s good. 3) I add a bit more broth than suggested. The first time I made this recipe, all the broth evaporated and the fish stuck to the bottom of the pan (I also prefer to use vegetable broth, but that is a taste preference.) 4) The lemon pepper isn’t enough; we add more seasonings to give the fish extra flavor. Oregano leaves are a must and – depending on my mood – cayenne pepper/red pepper flakes (for a little oomph) or cinnamon (for sweetness). I usually serve this recipe with mashed sweet potatoes (they add some substance to the meal, but still keep it semi-healthy), but asparagus, an avocado salad or Waldorf salad would all be good accompaniments.
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51 users found this review helpful

Minced Beef with Black-Eyed Beans

Reviewed: Apr. 21, 2008
We need to develop a better name for this recipe because the current title doesn't do it justice. For someone like myself who likes spices (yes, I also increased the amount of spices used) and wants to increase protein intake, this is a wonderful dish. The cumin, the heat of the chili powder and chilies, and the aroma of the garam masala really blend and flavor the beef well. The only reason I didn't give the recipe 5 stars is because this is essentially a bowl of beef. As Asma suggested, warm up some pita bread, make the raita (fyi: for those unfamiliar with Middle Eastern cooking, she means plain yogurt - not vanilla!), etc. I purposely double the dish, so that I can take any leftovers for lunch where I serve the meat on top of lettuce, additional tomatoes and a light vinaigrette (sometimes just additional lemon juice, but usually a bit of oil and vinegar.) Delicious.
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4 users found this review helpful

Moroccan Chicken

Reviewed: Apr. 19, 2008
Hands down, my favorite recipe on this site. In fact, it became the comfort food of choice for my family this past winter. I only make a few, subtle changes to the dish: 1) Triple the amount of spices (we like spices), 2) Use a whole can of diced tomatoes in garlic and olive oil to add an extra dimension of flavor (alas, the sundried tomato paste did not work. Too expensive, plus it got lost with all the other ingredients), and 3) use chicken tenders instead of chicken breasts if your grocery store sells them. The tenders are cheaper, fry faster and are easier to cut. Overall, an EXCELLENT recipe.
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4 users found this review helpful

Fattoush

Reviewed: Apr. 5, 2008
In the past, my family included salads to our meat dishes because we knew the importance of vegetables, but fattoush is one of few salads we actually crave. In fact, I make a larger batch (separating the pita chips so that they don't become soggy) to use for lunch the next day. Regarding those pita chips, sorry, you can't replace the real thing with the store bought variety. The pita chips make this salad what it is and besides, it only adds about ten minutes - including clean up! - to cook time. Just make sure to carefully watch the frying and only cook until pita bread is LIGHT brown in color. Remove from stove and let them continue to cook in the hot oil for another minute until they are darker. (If not, you quickly run the risk of burning the bread.) I do recommend having all the salad ingredients on hand. In regards to the dressing, if you don't have/don't want to buy onion flakes and celery salt, just add more lemon pepper (although I find the crushed lemon or sumac sold in Middle Eastern shops to be better alternatives) and more white wine vinegar to give it that extra tang. This salad is a great match for beef dishes and we also like it for our Middle Eastern mezze night where we make this salad, hummus and falafel. Thanks for the recipe.
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43 users found this review helpful

Ghoraiybah

Reviewed: Mar. 17, 2008
This isn't a recipe that will appeal to all taste buds because the cookies are more flavored than sweet, but we sure like them. As the other reviewers have mentioned, I do think the cookies benefit from a little vanilla extract, brown sugar and salt, but the cardamom is key. If you're using the packaged variety, you'll probably want to triple the amount, but using the actual cardamom pods makes a huge difference and really gives these cookies their flavor. I'm the first to admit you can't buy the pods everywhere (and if you do, they are on the pricey side), but if you have them, use them! (To extract cardamom: lightly brown pods in a pan over high heat - but don't overdo them! - remove cardamom seed from shells and crush using a mortar and pestle. For the leftover pods, I occasionally add them to my tea like the Lebanese do.) Also, this is one of few cookie recipes that turns out better using the old fashioned bowl & spatula method rather than the mixer. Finally, make sure your butter is softened (place in microwave for 25 seconds) to ensure a good dough.
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17 users found this review helpful

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