Southern Collard Greens Recipe Reviews - Allrecipes.com (Pg. 4)
Reviewed: Jan. 25, 2009
Better than what I had at Sylvia's in Harlem earlier this year (don't tell them though!). I used leftover Christmas hambone. It goes excellent with cornbread. I recommend soaking the leaves for sure, especially if they're a little old looking.
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Reviewed: Jan. 11, 2009
Take it from a TRUE Alabama girl, this is not exactly how to make REAL SOUTHERN collard greens. First, you must cut out all the thick stems. Discard them. Chop greens and cook as direted in this recipe with hamhocks. I use a pressure cooker and pressure them for 45 minutes. After the steam is released, take off the top and add at least 1/4 bacon grease. Nothing else will do, arteries be damned! Cook down until no liquid is left. If using a tradition stove-top method, add the bacon grease after the two hours of cooking. This is the method used for generations in my family. AWESOME! The more bacon grease the better.
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Reviewed: Sep. 23, 2008
I thought it was okay, but nothing great. First it was way too greasy. Then the ham hocks, once cooked the chunks were too big, I think they should have been cut somewhere along the way. At the end, they made my stomach sick. The sad thing is, I love greens, but this was not what I was expecting.
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Home Town: Calexico, California, USA

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Reviewed: May 7, 2008
add some white suger and its a winner!! I add garlic sometimes aswell, but the hot and sweet is what really sets it off for our family
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Reviewed: Jan. 23, 2008
Just a little note from another "Southern Belle", suger is sometimes used in greens(even collards)to cut the bitterness. Greens only sweeten after the first cold weather gets to them. My grandparents and parents farmed greens for years and this is what they taught me.
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Reviewed: Nov. 26, 2007
These were fabulous! I let them cook for even a couple more hours, I figured it couldn't hurt. Great flavor and very simple! Thank you!
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Cooking Level: Expert

Home Town: Saint Louis, Missouri, USA
Living In: Jacksonville, Florida, USA

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Reviewed: Feb. 4, 2007
Coming from a Southern gal ~ this is terrific! Made this recipe for New Year's Day (exactly as recipe is stated). My guests loved the collard greens. When my grocer put collards on sale, I bought 4 bunches and made a huge pot for freezing. Yes, that good. YUM! Thank you for sharing.
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Photo by LYNNESTWINS

Cooking Level: Expert

Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Living In: Snellville, Georgia, USA

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Reviewed: Jan. 16, 2007
YOU ARE RIGHT THEY SHOULD BE COOKED FOR HOURS. ANYTHING LESS PRODUCES BITTER GREENS.
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Reviewed: Jan. 4, 2007
This recipes turns our collards as good as my grandmother's. I have cooked collards according to this recipe several times and always get rave reviews.
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Cooking Level: Expert

Home Town: Bishopville, South Carolina, USA
Living In: Columbia, South Carolina, USA

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Reviewed: Jun. 29, 2006
This is how I was taught to make collards by a dear friend from North Carolina, with 2 changes - no oil, and a splash of cider vinegar is essential. When the greens are fully cooked, I remove the ham hocks, shred the meat, and add it back to the greens. One tip for when you're prepping - I wash the cut collards in my sink 3 times, adding baking soda to the first wash. This helps remove some of the bitterness.
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Photo by MADBALL

Cooking Level: Intermediate

Home Town: Bolingbrook, Illinois, USA
Living In: San Marcos, California, USA

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Displaying results 31-40 (of 58) reviews

 
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