Quince Paste Recipe - Allrecipes.com
Quince Paste Recipe
  • READY IN 5 hr

Quince Paste

Recipe by  

"The quince is an old-fashioned, intensely aromatic, and dearly loved fruit. It is not an easy fruit to prepare, as it needs to be poached or cooked before it can be used in recipes. Quince paste is a wonderful accompaniment to cheese and crackers-try chevre as well as other mild, firm cheeses. You can also serve it for breakfast in place of jam."

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Ingredients Edit and Save

Original recipe makes 1 - 9 x13x1 1/2 inch thick block Change Servings
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  • PREP

    20 mins
  • COOK

    3 hrs 30 mins
  • READY IN

    5 hrs

Directions

  1. Wash, peel, and core the quinces, reserving the cores and peels. Coarsely chop the flesh and transfer the fruit to a large pan. Wrap the cores and peels in cheesecloth, tie the bag with kitchen string, and add it to the pan. (The peels contain most of the fruit's pectin, which contributes to the firmness of the quince paste.)
  2. Pour in enough water to cover the quinces and boil, half-covered, for 30 to 40 minutes or until the fruit is very soft. Remove the bag of peels and pass the quince flesh through a sieve or food mill. (For best results, don't use a food processor as it will result in too fine a texture.) You should have about 2 1/2 pounds of fruit pulp.
  3. Transfer the quince pulp to a saucepan and add the sugar (ideally, you should add the same amount of sugar, by weight, as the fruit pulp). Cook and stir over low heat until the sugar is dissolved. Continue cooking for about 1 1/2 hours, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon, until the paste becomes very thick and has a deep orange color. Draw the wooden spoon along the bottom of the saucepan: it should leave a trail and the quince mixture will stick to the spoon.
  4. Lightly grease a 9x13-inch baking dish or line it with greased parchment paper. Transfer the quince paste to the baking dish, spreading it about 1 1/2-inch thick. Smooth the top and allow it to cool.
  5. Dry the paste on your lowest oven setting, no more than 125 degrees F (52 degrees C), for about 1 1/2 hours. Allow the quince paste to cool completely before slicing. (In Europe, the traditional method of drying the quince paste is to leave it in a cupboard for about 7 days. The remaining juices will continue to evaporate and render a drier paste.)
  6. Store quince paste in an airtight container in the refrigerator; the color will deepen with age.
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Footnotes

  • Editor's Note
  • In Provence, quince paste is often served with cheeses from the Savoy region. In Spain and Portugal, quince paste (Membrillo) is served with manchego. Serve slices of quince paste with cheese or as a breakfast spread.
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Reviews More Reviews

Most Helpful Positive Review
Oct 07, 2008

I have just moved to a new house, and new country, and am blessed with a number of fruit/nut trees, one being a lovely good sized quince, have tried a number of recipes and this one is the simplest I have come across and easily competes with the rest. Thank You. as an added bonus most of the local comunity do not realise the many uses of this fruit for food and as a herbal remedy, always good to bring somthing new to the table, Thank you again

 
Most Helpful Critical Review
Sep 22, 2014

I suspected that the sugar proportion seemed way too high so I halved it -- using 1 cup of sugar for 2 pounds of quince. Well two pounds of quince are now too cloying to be edible. This not supposed to candy. Poor people who actually use the full amount of sugar suggested in the recipe.

 
Dec 03, 2009

This was outstanding! I was so excited to see this recipe on here, because I’m crazy about quince. The first time I tried them, I thought, “Where has this fruit been all my life?!” I think I added too much water, though, during the quince cooking stage. Next time I’ll add a couple of cups to start with, and add more if needed. From 4½ pounds of whole quince, I got more than 5 lbs of quince puree! Like I said: too much water. It took a long time to cook down. I spread it into a pan and left it in a 100 degree F oven overnight (we have a “bread proof” cycle that was perfect for this). Wonderful! As good as the membrillo we had in Portugual. Perfect with crusty bread and slices of manchego cheese. It made a ton, so I'm giving away slabs as gifts to a select few!

 
Dec 31, 2011

While preparing another quince recipe I discovered what a royal PITA it is to core and peel quince. So... when I looked at this recipe I decided to invert it. I halved the quinces, put them in a pot and barely covered them with water. Cooked for 40 mins or so until they were soft. Then I scooped them out with a slotted spoon and ran them through a food mill/ fruit and vege strainer aka the thing with the auger and screen that separates flesh from seeds and skins. I strained the liquid that remained and returned it to the pan and reheated it to dissolve the sugar. Remixed it all hot and was left with something the consistency of applesauce. The only thing I had to watch was that the volume of seeds can jam the auger so I had to clear it once. Huge time saver over peeling first, plus less waste.

 
Jan 19, 2010

This recipe was so easy! Someone at work brought some quinces in and didn't know what they were. He stated his grandmother used them all time when he was kid. So I make this paste and served it crackers, brie, cheddar cheese and it was the talk on the whole floor. The only problem it call for a lot of sugar. Next time I want to try stevia or splenida. Thanks for sharing.

 
May 30, 2011

This was so good! We ate it as a little sweet treat with meals. It was good alone or on toast. Great recipe!

 

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Nutrition

  • Calories
  • 169 kcal
  • 8%
  • Carbohydrates
  • 44.1 g
  • 14%
  • Cholesterol
  • 0 mg
  • 0%
  • Fat
  • 0.1 g
  • < 1%
  • Fiber
  • 1.2 g
  • 5%
  • Protein
  • 0.3 g
  • < 1%
  • Sodium
  • 3 mg
  • < 1%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

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