Pupusas de Queso (Cheese-Stuffed Tortillas) Recipe Reviews - Allrecipes.com (Pg. 3)
Reviewed: May 22, 2011
This gave me the idea for the base of what a pupusa is but the proportions don't work and the technique leaves you with a too-thick pupusa that doesn't cook all the way through without burning (especially given that the preferred stove setting is "medium high heat"). The first time I tried this recipe, the dough was just too dry -- it kept cracking when I rolled it out and couldn't hold its shape. It also burnt when I tried to cook it due, in great part, to its dryness. I made some changes that made it work a lot better. I added almost an entire cup of extra water to what is called for in the recipe. I also had to add about a quarter cup of canola oil to it to achieve a more workable consistency and to justify not having to grease the skillet. Salt brings out the flavor of food so I added 1/4 teaspoon of salt to the dough as well. As a few people have mentioned, the way to "seal" the cheese in the middle shouldn't be like making an empanada where you have to pinch edges together to seal the filling. As long as your dough is moist enough, it does work to create a disc from a golf-sized ball of dough on the palm of your hand, insert a ball of crumbled or shredded cheese in the middle (and other fillings of your choice), close the dough around the filling and flatten it down into about a half-inch thickness. These are delicious with curtido and a side of beans and rice. Mmmm.
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Photo by elttaes

Cooking Level: Intermediate

Home Town: San Juan, National Capital Region, Philippines
Living In: Seattle, Washington, USA

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Reviewed: May 9, 2011
Not enough water. I followed another reviewers advice and added water until the dough reached a cookie dough consistency. That ratio was 2:2, and the pupusas were far easier to make. My second time around I gave up the two disc method and just did the ball up and reflatten method.
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Cooking Level: Expert

Living In: Salem, Oregon, USA

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Reviewed: Feb. 19, 2011
Both parents are from El Salvador and my mom traditional shapes it by hand and inserts the cheese into it and flattens it back up. She doesn't layer it with cheese in between. The cheese will occasionally brown as it comes out of the tortilla, but it's a wonderful salty flavor, especially fabulous with the curtido, which is onion, coleslaw, carrots and vinegar (think there's a bit of sugar she throws in too--not much). It sits for a few days and softens up and is wonderful with the pupusa. Traditionally, I believe adding refried beans is common, as well as something similar to bacon bits. I don't have the technique down with my hands making it perfectly round, something my mom can do, but if you can master it, it's a great treat!
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Cooking Level: Expert

Home Town: Kansas City, Missouri, USA
Reviewed: Feb. 7, 2011
This gave me a good idea about what to do with the large amount of masa harina and queso fresco I happen to have. I found the proportion of flour and water off, and it is completely different from the instructions on the masa harina's package. On the package it's recommended mixing 1 cup of masa harina with 1.5 cup of water. I followed that after finding out 1 cup of water is way not adequate for 2 cups of flour. Regarding the techniques, I am used to making similar items in my native cuisine using the traditional method so I didn't follow the recipe at all. Instead I formed a ball of dough in my palm, made a large indentation in the middle by cupping my hand. I then added cheese in the indentation and pinched the edges together to close the cheese in and form a ball. I flattened the ball into more or less a disk before putting it on the skillet. I cooked mine for much longer than 2 minutes per side because I wasn't sure if it was done. But the results are very good nevertheless. For whatever reason I find these pupusas very mild yet surprisingly comforting. That's interesting since I didn't grow up eating it. I like to pop a leftover piece in the microwave to heat it slightly and snack on it. Will definitely make it again!
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Photo by Michelle
Reviewed: Jan. 16, 2011
I wish I had a tortilla press because these pupusas took a lot of time to make. I added salt to the dough and refried beans to the filling. Instead of using two pieces of tortilla, I only used one. I also cooked half of them in a little bit of oil because the first half were coming out too dry. I served it with homemade curtido on the side because I can't eat pupusas without it.
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Photo by Michelle

Cooking Level: Intermediate

Living In: Pasadena, California, USA

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Reviewed: Jun. 27, 2010
My husband is El Salvadoran the first half of his life so I am not. I wanted to make something near and dear to his heart and this worked. Thank you so much. BTW, I used fresh mozzarella and he said it was great.
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Photo by josioradio

Cooking Level: Intermediate

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Reviewed: Dec. 26, 2009
I tried a mixture of traditional vs. easy and what I did was use a tortilla maker. After making the ball I would put it in the mold and then fill it up with the cheese. Fold it over and make another ball and then put it back in the mold. Some of the filling can come out but it definitely looks really nice this way.
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Photo by PAMELA D. aPROpos of nothing
Reviewed: Nov. 15, 2009
I'm not sure about the proportions of masa to water. I added more water and they were still too dry so I dumped leftover cheese on top. Probably just takes making this a few times to get the right feel of the dough, more by feel, less by measure. Kids liked it and I look forward to"making it mine". Used black beans and jack for the trial run.
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Photo by PAMELA D. aPROpos of nothing

Cooking Level: Expert

Home Town: El Paso, Texas, USA
Living In: Dallas, Texas, USA

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Reviewed: Oct. 26, 2009
Last year my friend for El Salvador made these for us on Thanksgiving while we cooked the actual dinner. It was supposed to be a light snack to keep us going until dinner was ready. Well... we ended up eating so many of these that we really didn't "tackle" Thanksgiving dinner full force like we usually do. She did use the two-tortilla method described in this recipe so...I guess it is also an authentic way of preparing them. Maybe she is from the side of the country that makes them this way...who knows. However, I do think that the single tortilla method described by our fellow reviewers must yield a better, less doughy result. My friend used beans along with the cheese as filling. The beans were kind of like a homemade refried beans. She prepared curtido to go with them (served on the side) and also a very plain and bland tomato sauce (she just pureed a couple of roma tomatoes). The sauce by itself was nothing but it worked very well together because of the strong flavor of the curtido. It helped mellow out the vinegary taste of the curtido. Pupusas are not my favorite thing in the world, they are just Ok for me (no matter who makes them, and I've had plenty). However, when compared to others I've had, these are very good.
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Photo by LatinaCook

Cooking Level: Intermediate

Home Town: Jardines Del Caribe, Ponce, Puerto Rico
Reviewed: Dec. 15, 2008
It is also traditional to use harina de arroz (rice flour) to make your dough.
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