Potica Recipe - Allrecipes.com
Potica  Recipe
  • READY IN 3 hr

Potica

Recipe by  

"This is a wonderful bread from Slovenia with a sweet, nutty filling. Due to the spelling and pronunciation (paw-tee'-tzah) it's very hard to find the recipe."

Back
Next
+ Recipe Box + Shopping List + Menu Print

Ingredients Edit and Save

Original recipe makes 2 loaves Change Servings
ADVERTISEMENT
  • PREP

    30 mins
  • COOK

    1 hr
  • READY IN

    3 hrs

Directions

  1. In a small mixing bowl, dissolve yeast, 1 teaspoon sugar, and 3 tablespoons of the flour in warm milk. Mix well, and let stand until creamy, about 10 minutes.
  2. In a large mixing bowl cream the butter with the remaining sugar. Add the egg yolks one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add the yeast mixture, remaining milk, 4 cups of flour and the salt; mix well. Add the remaining flour, 1/2 cup at a time, stirring well after each addition. When the dough has pulled together, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, about 8 minutes. Lightly oil a large bowl, place the dough in the bowl and turn to coat with oil. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise in a warm place until doubled in volume, about 1 hour.
  3. Lightly grease one or two cookie sheets. Deflate the dough and turn it out onto a lightly floured surface. Divide the dough into two equal pieces and roll Out to 1/4 to 1/2 inch thickness. Spread each piece with melted butter, honey, raisins, walnuts and cinnamon. Roll each piece up like a jelly roll and pinch the ends. Place seam side down onto the prepared baking sheets. Let rise until double in volume. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  4. Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for about 60 minutes or until the top is golden brown.
Kitchen-Friendly View
ADVERTISEMENT

Reviews More Reviews

Most Helpful Positive Review
Mar 17, 2010

I live in Slovenia (for 11 years) and speak the language. I also have a Croatian heritage and my grandmother made potica. Just for the record, the correct pronunciation is po-tee-tza. This recipe is really authentic. It is traditionally made for Christmas and Easter.

 
Most Helpful Critical Review
Jan 26, 2006

I used pecans instead of walnuts, only because that is what I had on hand. just wasn't as good as we thought it would be.

 

29 Ratings

Dec 29, 2010

A tip for potica makers. Roll your dough on a floured cloth. After you spread the filling over the dough, pick of the end of the cloth and gently pull letting the dough roll over on itself. You'll be able to get the dough paper thin and reduce tearing. Also, grind the walnuts into a paste instead of chopping them, this will keep them from ripping the dough. This dough is exactly like the recipe I use. The filling is a little diff. I've noticed many variations.

 
Dec 23, 2009

I have made potica for over 20 yrs. (but) my dough recipe has to be made the night before. I found this one so I could make it the same day. The dough is wonderful, easy to make and wonderful to work with and that means alot because the rolling of the dough is the hardest and most time consuming. thank you for this recipe

 
Mar 08, 2008

A very difficult recipe to make indeed, especially for someone like me who has no bread making experience whatsoever! Be sure to roll the dough out to be very thin. My first attempt was not that successful but not so unsuccessful that I will not try to make it again. Even though my potica turned out to be quite ugly it tasted pretty good!

 
Dec 22, 2010

I grew up having this for Christmas every year. My Grandmother would make it and the whole family looked forward to it. With several grandchildren, it was an honor when we were old enough to learn this art. It is a time consuming recipe but well worth the effort. We have always used pecans but walnuts would be a less expensive alternative. There are also some minor differences in this recipe and the one I grew up with. It's bitter sweet to see this recipe posted as my family has always kept it a secret but it really is good enough to share. This bread gets better and better the more you make it. TIP: don't over-knead and try to use as little flour as possible.

 
Dec 16, 2011

This is just like my recipe except mine has 5 egg yolks. For best results, follow tips posted: chop nuts in a food processor to an almost paste-like consistency, roll dough on a floured table cloth. You want it VERY thin! Dough should be about 55" x 35". Here is my tip: As you are rolling the dough/filling, prick w/something very thin (I use a cake tester from Pampered Chef). Keep making several pricks across the length of the dough after every turn. This will keep air out and prevent the dough from getting thick as it bakes. The end result will be a nice, tight spiral. Follow these tips and you will have a DELICIOUS potica!! If anyone has a recipe for a chocolate potica that does not contain nuts, please let me know. Thanks!!

 
Apr 17, 2007

I made this for easter and it was a hit with the family. this was my first time making bread

 

Rate This Recipe

Glad you liked it! Your friends will, too:
ADVERTISEMENT

Nutrition

  • Calories
  • 306 kcal
  • 15%
  • Carbohydrates
  • 35.2 g
  • 11%
  • Cholesterol
  • 75 mg
  • 25%
  • Fat
  • 17.5 g
  • 27%
  • Fiber
  • 1.4 g
  • 6%
  • Protein
  • 4.5 g
  • 9%
  • Sodium
  • 174 mg
  • 7%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

See More
 
ADVERTISEMENT
Go Pro!

In Season

It’s Ghouls’ Night Out
It’s Ghouls’ Night Out

Get cute n’ creepy recipes to feed all your little monsters.

Allrecipes Cooking School
Allrecipes Cooking School

It’s everything you need to cook your best. Learn more about Allrecipes Cooking School.

Football Food for the Win
Football Food for the Win

All the game-day eats you need to crush the tailgate competition.

Related Videos

Ooey-Gooey Cinnamon Buns

These amazing sticky buns are topped with pecans and a luscious caramel sauce.

Cinnamon Rolls II

Watch how to make these top-rated cinnamon rolls.

How to Make Scones

Make classic Scottish scones from scratch. It's simple!

Recently Viewed Recipes

 
ADVERTISEMENT
Argentina  |  Australia & New Zealand  |  Brazil  |  Canada  |  China  |  France  |  Germany  |  India  |  Italy  |  Japan  |  Korea  |  Mexico

Netherlands  |  Poland  |  Quebec  |  Russia  |  SE Asia  |  United Kingdom & Ireland  |  United States