No-Knead Artisan Style Bread Recipe Reviews - Allrecipes.com (Pg. 1)
Reviewed: Jul. 30, 2010
I've been baking no-knead bread ever since the original recipe came out in the New York Times several years ago, so trust me when I tell you it is not recommended that you remove the baking vessel from the oven after you've just spent 30 minutes heating it. Do NOT remove it from the oven, just pour the dough (batter, really) into the baking vessel and then cover and bake. That way you don't lose the heat you just spent half an hour to achieve to heat the pan. Also, there's no need to shake the dough once it's in the pan, it'll spread by itself while baking. It's really a misnomer to call this a dough, because it really comes out as a batter. I agree with the other reviewer that it's impossible to form it into any kind of a ball 'cause it's just too sticky. And forget the step of placing it on a towel to raise. It's just messy and doesn't achieve anything more than if you just stir it and place it in a bowl and let it rise another 2 hours. That said, I would rate this a 4, only because I think the instructions are not the best way to make this bread.
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Photo by JoAnn32789

Cooking Level: Expert

Living In: Winter Park, Florida, USA

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Reviewed: Oct. 1, 2010
I became an avid bread maker when I discovered Jim Lahey's recipe. I wanted to post it, but you beat me to it, Jewissa. I'll have to try adding the fresh herbs, though. Great idea! Proud as a peacock, I brought a few slices from my first loaf to work. One of my colleagues, who lived many years in various European countries, picked up a piece and immediately identified it as European peasant bread. After one bite, she said, "I need this recipe." (She hasn't bothered with recipes in years!) BTW, the "heavy-duty casserole dish" should be either cast iron or stoneware. I've read that Le Creuset works fine, as long as you remove the handles, which aren't oven-safe at 450 F. UPDATE: I brought this bread (minus the herbs) to a staff potluck, and it was a great success. There were many recipe requests. Those who've tried it are converts. The only challenges are to find the proper pot and to figure out the timing. I haven't bought bread since I discovered this recipe! 2ND UPDATE: I've found, tweeked, and posted a recipe for a healthier yet delicious whole-wheat multi-grain bread which uses the same method.
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Photo by J-9

Cooking Level: Intermediate

Living In: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

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Photo by gipper
Reviewed: Jul. 23, 2010
I use 1/2 tsp instant yeast. Mix all ingredients, cover the bowl & set it aside for 12 hours. Flour a surface, scrape the dough out, stretch it out, sprinkle with flour, fold it over itself one way & then the other, put a sheet of parchment paper in a bowl, spray with cooking oil spray & sprinkle with corn meal, place dough into the bowl for the 2nd rise (1-2 hours), & cover with a cotton towel. 1/2 hour before ready to bake, put the pot in the oven and preheat to to 500 degrees. When ready to bake, if you want sesame seeds/grains on the top, spray top with cooking oil and add your seeds/grains & pat down lightly, take the pot out of the oven and remove the lid. (I use several old towels just to protect surfaces when handling extra hot pots, also; you might want to use a pair of long sleeved pot mitts with silicone palms. Lift the parchment paper & dough out of the bowl and place it into the hot pot. Take a scissors and cut the excess parchment paper from around the top of the pot. Put the lid back on the pot and place it into the oven. After the first 5 minutes, lower the oven to 475 degrees & continue to bake for 25 minutes more. After 30 minutes, take out the pot, remove the lid & check the internal temperature. If it reads 200 degrees, & the end of the thermometer is not sticky or gooey, put the uncovered pot back in for 10-15 minutes until browned. Remove pot, use a turner to lift the bread & paper out & place bread on cooling rack. Remove paper when cooled.
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Cooking Level: Intermediate

Home Town: Kearny, New Jersey, USA
Living In: Mesa, Arizona, USA

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Photo by freewill2112
Reviewed: Jan. 19, 2011
I also have used this recipe for a couple years with great success. The only diff is I use 1/2 tsp. instant yeast, 1 tsp salt, 1 1/2 cups water. This is more in line with the Sullivan St. bakery recipe. I've included a pic of my version of cranberry walnut bread using this recipe. Simply add cran. and walnuts to flour mixture, then add water. Follow directions as given. I've had luck with a shorter proofing time also....12-15 hrs depending on the season. To make the baguette pictured, I placed the dough on a hot pizza stone and covered it with a loaf pan. Shorter baking time, that's all.
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Cooking Level: Intermediate

Home Town: Waterville, Maine, USA

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Reviewed: Mar. 23, 2011
I have been making no-knead bread 3 times a week for over a year - love it! I always thought that getting the dough from a towel into the pot a really clunky process, so I started using baking parchment and got myself a La Cloche. I rip off a piece of parchment a bit bigger than the bottom of the La Cloche, sprinkle it with flour or semolina and place the formed dough on it. Cover with a tea towel and allow it to rise while the La Cloche is preheating. What is great about this is that when the dough is ready to bake you can just lift the parchment and set it into the bottom of the La Cloche and put the lid on it. The parchment will stick out, but it does not affect the baking process at all. Sometimes the risen dough is so slack that I have to slide a pizza peel under the parchment to lift and transfer the loaf to the pot, but it works great, beautiful, high loaves of bread, no flipping or mess.
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Reviewed: Aug. 24, 2011
excellent bread. I love the crust. Tastes like great grams farm bread. I make it in the same bowls she used. I doubled the recipe this time the last time the loaf was gone before I could blink! if you feel the dough is to watery add more flour, too dry more water. Part of making bread is using your sight and the feel of the dough. sticky like a marshmallow you break apart in your hands. dry is like leather so you add a bit more water. I have been making bread for over 4 decades now if it doesn't work its not the recipe. The weather also plays big in making bread and the altitude at which you live.
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Photo by Julia

Cooking Level: Expert

Home Town: Alpine, New York, USA
Living In: Constantia, New York, USA
Reviewed: Nov. 17, 2010
I Use this recipe all the time. Usually 2 1/2 cups APF 1/2 c wheat flour. 1 1/4 c water. I let mine sit for 12 hours then 2. Ive made about 30 of these loaves over the last 3 months. Jalapeño cheese, rosemary garlic, Hearty (with germ, bran, flax and nuts). Awesome bread with no work. Comes out looking and tasting better than any artisan bought bread out there!
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Reviewed: Jul. 5, 2010
This is a great way to make bread. The recipe here is exactly like the one I have used in the past but mine used 1 teaspoon of instant yeast. I so not know if the difference is important, but measurements of instant yeast are smaller than active dry yeast. Annie0214
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Photo by sueb
Reviewed: Jul. 6, 2010
I made this bread with whole wheat instead of all-purpose flour. The herbs make it special! Instead of putting a towel under and another one over the bread, I used parchment paper on the bottom. That made it easy to stick in my Dutch oven! I'm sure I'll be making this again!
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Cooking Level: Expert

Living In: Prattville, Alabama, USA

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Reviewed: Nov. 5, 2010
gooey and just did not rise at all. stuck to the dutch oven. takes overnight with unsatisfying results. sorry.
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Photo by margaret

Cooking Level: Intermediate

Living In: Bangor, Pennsylvania, USA

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