Malasadas Recipe Reviews - Allrecipes.com (Pg. 1)
Reviewed: Oct. 17, 2014
This is directed to pieman (most critical helpful review). I have not made this recipe, but I have often made malasadas in Hawaii and the recipe was comparable. You said that yours were "oil-soaked". There is no oil as an ingredient. My conclusion therefore is that you did not pay attention to the temperature of your oil. If it is not hot enough it will not produce the crisp crust that will keep the oil out. It has nothing to do with paddles or blades. The instructions are just fine. You were told the texture you were looking for: "soft smooth dough". You were also told the temperature of the oil: 375 degrees F or 190 degrees C. Perhaps you did not have a candy thermometer and decided to "wing it". That doesn't work. Get a thermometer and try it again. Then you can make a judgment which will be helpful to someone else.
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Reviewed: Sep. 26, 2014
I love malasadas, and I'm Portuguese, we all grow up with this elephant ears ??
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Photo by Elizabeth Bennet
Reviewed: Jul. 3, 2014
I just tried to make this recipe today,the batter was very sticky, after fried it tasted fluffy. This is a good recipe. But, I am not good at fried things, so my doughnut contain many oil,what a pity, I should use higher temperature to fry them next time. I will try again, because I like the fluffy malasadas.
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Reviewed: Mar. 7, 2014
The taste was good. I just made this recipe and here's what I'll do next time: 1) half the recipe--way too much for me and my braddah's family. 2) 375 was way too hot-maybe 325 next time--the first batch was all "koge" (burnt). 3) my dough didn't rise so I placed the bowl in another bowl filled with warm water--next time I'll let it rise, punch it down and let it rise again.
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Reviewed: Jan. 24, 2014
I have made these once before with my mom when I was sixteen and they were a great hit with my friends and teachers. I decided to look up the recipe again so I could make then again for my friends in college. I am hoping now that I am older and know how to cook more I will be able to make these by myself this time with not as much trouble as I had the first time.
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Reviewed: Dec. 26, 2013
It's ok
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Reviewed: Apr. 25, 2013
OMG!! This is just what I've been looking for. After surfing, coming in off the water, there's nothing like a bunch of hot malasadas!!!!! Truly Portugese/Hawaiian brings back fond memories of the islands!!
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Reviewed: Mar. 21, 2013
so simple and delicious
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Reviewed: Sep. 30, 2012
the best donut ever you must try it
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Cooking Level: Expert

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Reviewed: Sep. 26, 2012
Malasadas are made traditionally in madeira (many portuguese decendents in hawaii are from madeira) with moonshine as a flavoring agent. Sugar is minimal in order to make a more fried-bread rather than sweet confection. Bread is then eaten alone, cinnamon sugar, or sugar cane syrup. This recipe wasn't what I grew up with but very tasty. I did enjoy it and all of you who try it will likely enjoy it too. A nice tweek is to add a bit of nutmeg or/and orange rind. yummy!
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Displaying results 1-10 (of 53) reviews

 
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