Divine Hard-Boiled Eggs Recipe Reviews - Allrecipes.com (Pg. 2)
Reviewed: Aug. 11, 2013
This is a great method, IF you don't live in a high altitude area. Here in our area of NM, this would give you a pile of runny egg!
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Reviewed: Aug. 10, 2013
I have cooked eggs this way for years, and it's by far the easiest and most foolproof. If you forget them nothing much happens because the water is steadily cooling off. If your shells stick it is not because of the cooking method but is the result of cooking eggs that are too fresh. They lose moisture as they age and will come out of the shells more easily if you wait to cook them at about a week or less before the date on the box. Also, as others have mentioned, I leave them in the pan with plenty of ice water and they will be cold about twenty minutes after cooking.
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Reviewed: Aug. 10, 2013
I think the sitting time after reaching the boil point, depends on what size the eggs are. There is a big difference in cooking time, between small eggs and extra large eggs.
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Reviewed: Aug. 10, 2013
I basically do my eggs this way all the time. I never have the green line. If you let the eggs sit in hot water for 15 minutes and then in cold water and keep cold, the eggs shells will slide right off if you gently tap all around shells to crack.
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Cooking Level: Intermediate

Home Town: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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Reviewed: Aug. 10, 2013
The correct way to hard boil eggs--you can find it in older cookbooks. For those who have trouble peeling the eggs, the key there is not how you boil the eggs but the age of the eggs. The fresher the egg, the harder they are to peel. If you can anticipate your need for hard boiled eggs, buy the eggs and let them 'age'.
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Cooking Level: Intermediate

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Reviewed: Aug. 10, 2013
I'm giving this four stars because the process makes you take more steps than you need to. Follow the instructions to the point of letting the eggs sit for 15 minutes. Take the pot and place it under cold, running water. (I do this until the pot itself is cool.) Leave cold water over the eggs. Check the water temperature every few minutes. When it starts getting warm, cool it off again. And, from my experience, the eggs are much easier to peel when you're done cooling them than they are after they've been in the refrigerator for two hours. In fact, when I take a hard-boiled egg out of the refrigerator, I put it in a glass with warm water in it for 2-3 minutes. I roll the shell on a hard surface so it breaks up a lot then start peeling at the bigger end. The key is to pick up that membrane at the top. The shell will almost roll off. Warming the shell of the egg makes that membrane much easier to get a hold of and peel off easily.
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Cooking Level: Expert

Home Town: San Diego, California, USA
Living In: Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

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Reviewed: Aug. 10, 2013
I have been doing this for years...works perfect every time! I don't wait to peel them, just crack them under cold water and peel away.
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Reviewed: Aug. 10, 2013
Yes, it DOES work too!!! :)
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Cooking Level: Professional

Home Town: Atlantic, Pennsylvania, USA
Reviewed: Aug. 10, 2013
I was always told that putting salt or vinegar in the water is so that if an egg cracks, it will keep the white from seeping out into the water. But I've recently read a tip that adding a little baking soda will make them easier to peel. I've tried it, and it works! I no longer bother with vinegar or salt. For all those who have trouble peeling the eggs.....I always put the cooked eggs IMMEDIATELY into a bowl of ice water, even if I'm not using them right away. The ice water shocks them and stops the cooking immediately.
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Reviewed: Aug. 10, 2013
Great instructions. Works!
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Cooking Level: Expert

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