Caramel Sauce Recipe Reviews - Allrecipes.com (Pg. 4)
Reviewed: Nov. 5, 2010
I've made caramel this way for many years. It is delicious! A couple of hints: Don't use sweetened condensed milk with a pull tab top, think old school. The lids on these cans are already weak for easy opening. Use a BIG kettle of water. Fold an old dishrag and place under the can while boiling, or something else to lift the can off the bottom of the pot. You don't have to use a rolling boil, a simmer or a little bigger than that will do. 3 hours is a minimum for a spoonable caramel, longer makes a thicker, darker caramel. I'd guess that the reviewer that got the butterscotch flavor needed to leave it to boil a while longer. But hey, I like butterscotch, too. Allow the can to cool in the pot with the water. I wouldn't handle it until it is cool. Plus, who wants to handle a gallon of boiling water and a hot can of lava! This is WAY better than the dip you can buy for apples! My grandmother's name was Marie. She cooked for 8 kids. If she gave me a recipe, I knew it was tried and true!
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Cooking Level: Expert

Home Town: Dover, Tennessee, USA

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Reviewed: Oct. 25, 2010
I love it! Tastes great and so easy to do.
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Reviewed: Jul. 31, 2010
I like to use this technique in a lot of my recipes but i boil about 6 cans at a time and if i want to make another desert i don't have to wait 3 hours keep lids sealed never exploded on me ... the actual term in this is called Dolce Leche which means sweet milk it is used all the time in spanish deserts I discovered this on my trip to Ushuaia Argentina, happy baking!!
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Cooking Level: Expert

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Reviewed: Jul. 8, 2010
People, People, People. My greatgrandmother, grandmother, mother and now myself have been boiling Eagle Brand Condensed milk for a century and half. Some reviews said that the cans were exploding, easy resolution. 1. Do NOT open the can or puncture holes in it.in any way 2. Get a large pot of water boiling. 3. Once water is boiling, take off milk labels and put cans into water (I do 4 at a time as it will keep on the shelf for a few months) 4. Turn temperature down to simmering & allow to cook for 2 to 3 hours (the longer you cook it the darker/thicker it will be) No one in my family has ever turned he cans. 5. after cooking for alloted time, turn off heat and remove pan from the stove to allow to cool, & then just walk away, do NOT attempt to drain the water or remove the can or open the can at all. 6. You MUST allow the cans & water to cool, before opening the can up. This will prevent the exploding can dilemma for some of the reviewers! The milk can also be done on a campfire (which I have done at least a dozen times or more-allow it to cool in your cast iron dutch oven the same way you do in a pan on your stove top). It is an amazing treat at camp (the boyscouts love it). This comes out thick enough to spread & we have been eating on sliced apples for as long as I can remember-delish. Add a scoop to a pan with a little heavy cream & heat for an amazing caramel sauce...As far as the babysitting comments go...watching your food usually goes hand in hand with cooking :)
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Cooking Level: Intermediate

Living In: Altoona, Pennsylvania, USA

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Reviewed: Jun. 2, 2010
This is more like dulce de leche than caramel sauce. A word of warning, as I don't think this recipe states it clearly enough, you must ensure that there is always water covering the can. The water will boil off within time, so you'll need to keep adding water so that the entire can is always submerged. If you let it boil without being submerged, it causes the pressure in the can to increase and it will explode.
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Reviewed: Feb. 11, 2010
My grandma, mom, and now myself, have been doing this for a very long time. If you keep the boiling water above the level of the can, and do not cover with a lid, you will not have a can explode. We only do it for 2 hours or so and it turns out wonderful.
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Reviewed: Feb. 3, 2010
This was great. I didnt even bother turning the can. When I opened the can, the sauce was super thick and rich. I mixed with some milk and rum extract to make a "sauce" for breadpudding.
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Reviewed: Jan. 25, 2010
After reading alot of the reviews, I was quite apprehivise of trying this out. But truly, it was a great recipe!
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Reviewed: Dec. 9, 2009
This turns out amazing! Make sure to use Eagle Brand sweetened condensed milk for a smooth & thick consistency. When I used Carnation Brand, the texture was a little grany, like half melted sugar. Also, I boiled an extra hour (total of 4 hours) to make sure it was really thick & camelized. I use this on apple slices, poured over a hot apple pie, or over icecream. Also makes a great addition to gift baskets.
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Cooking Level: Expert

Living In: Valley Springs, California, USA
Reviewed: Sep. 19, 2009
This is NOT a true caramel sauce, my thought is that this is a simplified version of dulce de leche. The method couldn't be any easier. Some reviews indicated trouble w/ cans exploding, well that issue is easily solved. 1. Do NOT open the can or puncture it in any way. 2. Set a large pot of water to boiling. 3. Once water is boiling, insert cans (making sure to remove the outer label) 4. Turn temperature to where it's gently simmering and allow to simmer for 2-3 hours (the longer you cook it the darker/thicker it will be) 5. Once time has elapsed, turn off heat and remove pan to allow to cool, and walk away, do NOT attempt to drain the water or remove the can or open the can at all. 6. You MUST allow the cans & water to cool, before opening the can up. Hopefully this will prevent the exploding can episodes for some of the reviewers!
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Cooking Level: Expert

Home Town: Jacksonville, Florida, USA

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