Aebleskiver Recipe Reviews - Allrecipes.com (Pg. 7)
Reviewed: Jan. 11, 2008
This is a good recipe for a dish that we've been making for years. I would suggest that you don't use a fork to do the turning, as it rips the Aebleskiver. A skewer or knitting needle has done the job for years for the Danes, so why change? Once you get the hang of it, you'll be flipping these over in record time. Also, butter gives these a much better taste and texture than oil....oil is too greasy for something this delicate and sweet.
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Reviewed: Dec. 30, 2007
Turned out well. Easy to flip. Next time I'll experiment with fillings...including maybe some red bean paste for a Korean flair. Recipe is not sweet as is, so a sweet-type filling would be good.
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Cooking Level: Intermediate

Living In: Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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Reviewed: Dec. 25, 2007
so tender and light. not quite a donut, not quite a pancake, not quite a muffin. we ate ours with powder sugar, strawberries and whipped cream. the little balls are so cute and the batter is so easy to make.
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Cooking Level: Intermediate

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Reviewed: Dec. 21, 2007
A boyfriends mom introduced these to me first by making breakfast for us one day. I talked about them so much that my mom bought a pan for me on a trip to Solvang in Calfifornia. Since then (about 8 years or so), I made them every time we had company, and now I make them at least once a month for my boyfriend and I. If you don't have buttermilk, the boxed buttermilk pancake mix works well to. I use a long wooden skewer for turning, forks never worked out right for me. It's try adding a piece of sliced fruit in the center before turning. Break them open when still hot and your favorite toppings melt into yummy gooiness. My favorite toppings are butter, peanut butter or Nutella, my boyfriend loves cream cheese in his.
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Cooking Level: Intermediate

Living In: Sacramento, California, USA

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Reviewed: Dec. 7, 2007
Never use oil, only butter in the pan. The name in danish is Æbleskiver which means Appleslices (I know they're not slices, but that's the name). So if you want to make them like we do in Denmark, and always have done, you need to put a piece of apple in every one of them. When they're done cooking on one side put a small piece of skinless apple in to the middle, turn them around with a knitting needle to finish cooking them on the other side. You can also use applesauce instead. Time to eat them, dip them in your favorite jam (we use jam from nordic berries like strawberry, my favorite), then dip them in icing sugar, eat and enjoy. We're not only eating them at Christmas but at any occasion. More traditional Christmas cookies are ``Klejner (don't know what to call them in english)´´ and ``Pebernødder (peppernuts)´´. I'll post recipes later.
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Reviewed: Nov. 29, 2007
Outstanding recipe!! I tried this with some twists you may like. I left the basic recipe intact as it's perfect. I put about a teaspoon of oil in each well of the pan instead of a tablespoon. I then caramelized some apples in a saute pan. I added the diced apple chunks to the batter after I poured it into the monk pan (abelskiver pan). I also made some with ham and cheddar, havarti, chocolate chips. Simply add whatever additional ingredients you like after you pour the batter in the wells of the pan (sprinkle them on top of the wet batter). Then let them cook per the recipe and flip and cook the other side. This is by far the best recipe I have tried for these treats!!
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Cooking Level: Professional

Home Town: Detroit, Michigan, USA
Living In: Durham, North Carolina, USA

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Reviewed: Nov. 16, 2007
I've had very good results using this recipe. I think beating the egg whites and folding them in is what makes the difference. My daughter loves making these and does a better job turning the 'skivers than I do!
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Cooking Level: Expert

Home Town: Salem, Oregon, USA
Living In: Albany, Oregon, USA

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Reviewed: Aug. 23, 2007
My husband had an aebleskiver pan when we were married and I've been hooked ever since. We eat them with syrup, jam, pudding, or just about anything.
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Living In: Blackfoot, Idaho, USA

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Reviewed: Aug. 19, 2007
I was looking for an aebleskiver recipe with buttermilk and this fit the bill. I substituted applesauce for the butter and then used butter instead of oil in the pan. Worked great. I also filled mine with a bit of jam. Not sure about using two tablespoons of batter for each one. I used one tablespoon for each and they were the perfect size.
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Cooking Level: Intermediate

Home Town: Detroit, Michigan, USA
Living In: Emsdetten, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany

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Reviewed: Aug. 1, 2007
Found an aebleskiver pan at a local thrift shop...I was the only one who knew what it was since I grew up near Solvang, CA, home of Arnie's Famous Aebleskivers. So the first time I made this was a total flop, because the cast iron pan was not seasoned yet. I have found that for this recipe to work for me, the pan has to preheat for 20 min or so (Put the pan on, then mix up the ingredients) - also, I have to put oil in the cups each time I start a new batch of 7 balls. The knitting needle approach works best for me. I wait for the edges to look a little dry, then turn the doughball 1/4 turn, allowing the next bit of batter to spill out and cook. They aren't perfectly round like experts make, but they're getting there, the more often I make these. This has become our special Saturday morning breakfast. I need two pans now, to make it go faster!
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Cooking Level: Expert

Home Town: Santa Maria, California, USA
Living In: Puyallup, Washington, USA

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Displaying results 61-70 (of 83) reviews

 
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