Wild About Mushrooms Article - Allrecipes.com
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Wild About Mushrooms

Explore the wild--and the cultivated--world of mushrooms.

Springing up like magic, mushrooms come in so many varieties and can be prepared in countless ways.




A Shortlist of Mushrooms

Chanterelle


This trumpet-shaped wild mushroom has a delicate flavor and ranges in color from yellow to orange. Its meaty texture toughens up when overcooked. Peak season: summer and winter.

wild mushroom

Enoki


Thin, brittle, and sweet, these are the delicate ballerinas of the mushroom world. Use raw in salads or briefly cooked in Asian dishes.

wild mushroom

Morel


This cousin to the truffle sports honeycombed caps and has a rich, smoky flavor. Morels are can be found fresh in specialty markets from mid to late spring, but are more readily available dried.

wild spring mushroom

Oyster


Fan-shaped clusters of wild oyster mushrooms can be found on rotting tree trunks. Young oysters are preferred; their peppery flavor mellows when cooked. Look for them fresh or canned in Asian and specialty markets.

wild mushroom fungi

Porcini


Rarely found fresh in United States markets, this earthy Italian beauty is even more potent when dried.


Portobello


These huge, flat, deeply flavored mushrooms are a natural substitute for steaks and burgers on the grill. Widely available throughout the year.

portobella

Shiitake


Native to Japan and Korea, and cultivated in the United States. Their woodsy flavor intensifies when dried. Available fresh in spring and autumn.

wild mushroom

Straw


Tiny in stature with musty overtones. Available fresh in specialty and Asian markets, but most commonly found canned.

wild mushroom

Truffle


One of the world's most prized and costly foods. Comes in basic black or white. Specially trained pigs and dogs sniff out these aromatic treasures in regions of France, Italy, and--believe it or not--Oregon. You might find fresh truffles in specialty markets from late autumn to midwinter. Truffle-infused oil is available and more affordable.

wild black truffle
Comments
Aug. 25, 2009 6:12 am
You should also state that some of the most sort after truffles are now produced in Western Australia
 
cyndi b. 
Oct. 21, 2009 2:26 pm
We live in upstate NY and have found truffle looking fungi around the bases of our oak trees. Any thoughts about us trying them or where we could bring them to find out what they are?
 
Graham 
Nov. 19, 2009 7:47 pm
Also in Australia a Dr Percy Wong from the University of Sydney has and is growing a variety of mushrooms that look like paddle pops and come from the Northern territory. He has also helped with a few other types.
 
angelmarkart 
Nov. 27, 2009 10:33 pm
I love truffles, especially the white - I am so glad that they are now produced in WA as so I dont have to bring them back every time Im in Italy...
 
silkpjs 
Jun. 10, 2010 5:38 am
cyndi b. That is most likely an entoloma abortivus, edible and delicious. If it looks all bumpy and weird, not a nice regular egg-like shape, that's a sure sign that it's not a poisonous amanita. If you're new to wild mushrooms, get a good book and read up on how to approach an unknown fungus.
 
Jun. 10, 2010 6:35 am
I would love to forge for wild mushrooms! Can anyone recommend a book that helps determine which ones are edible in the "Southern Ontario" area-Toronto? My Nona (now 91 yrs young) use to show us one variety up north of lake Superior. We picked only the ones with the skirt around the stalk. Hated them as a kid but will eat the whole bowl NOW! ... if I didn't have to share. lol There truly isn't anything comparable to a wild mushroom ... other than perhaps a truffle, which I've yet to treat my palette to. Thanx fungi fans!
 
Oct. 5, 2010 1:00 pm
In the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, we find a wild mushroom which my mother-in-law used to call "stump mushroom". It's found on the stumps of downed trees in the fall, looks very much like a shiitake, but lighter in color, with a ring between the stem and cap. It has a very earthy smell and taste and is absolutely delicious.
 
kaydee 
Nov. 6, 2010 2:40 pm
My husband and I were in the Upper Peninsula this summer. How I wish I had been on the site then. We will be going back next year and I will be sure to get some info on the mushrooms in the area. Thanks Hotchie.
 
Nov. 17, 2010 6:49 pm
I used to visit my aunt's farm many years ago in Souther Iowa and in the early summer she would go out in the pastures and return with Morel mushrooms that she fried up for us. One of my all-time favorite culinary memoies.
 
Jan. 31, 2011 3:10 pm
I live in northeastern Oklahoma and every Spring the big treat is to go out and find morel mushrooms growing wild. Wonderful!! We also are big gatherers of wild green onions! I freeze the onions to use all year long...but, there are NEVER enough mushrooms to save!
 
lisamaria 
Sep. 10, 2011 4:23 am
I live in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Every year we are overwhelmed with Boletes mushrooms. Because there are not many bugs here and plenty of moisture, they grow to huge sizes and are not shot full of worms like other places I have lived. I freeze them for use during the winter, but am running out of ways to cook them. Any ideas out there for me?
 
Mike 
Sep. 15, 2011 1:49 pm
I live in Wisconsin,and pick what I call button mushrooms.They are picked in the fall and can be found on tree stumps, logs and also around trees.They are picked after a freeze,and lite rain. Best picked before the caps fully opened.Some prefer the open caps, but the buttons or closed capped ones make excellent deep fried mushrooms.
 
DAVE999 
Oct. 13, 2011 2:27 pm
ARE ALL PUFF BALLS EDIBLE?
 
Barbara 
Dec. 13, 2011 7:49 pm
mushrooms are the number one lets have more. printable ones too.
 
wbicepuppy 
Jul. 30, 2012 4:51 pm
My grandfather would bring us to his wild mushroom hunts when we were kids, and turn the fruit of our labor into this delicious creamy mushroom soup. He passed away a couple years ago, and I miss him a lot... but his wild mushroom soup recipe, and his passion for mushroom-hunting, has been passed on to his children and grandchildren.
 
Sep. 17, 2012 8:56 pm
I have recently begun my journey in mushroom hunting & picking & a couple books that my brother turned me on to & have proven invaluble are: All That The Rain Promises and More: A Hip Pocket Field Guide & Mushrooms Demystified both by David Aurora Happy Hunting all :)
 
 
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